Did you know? (Random things in life)

Discussion in 'Chez Ziggy' started by Tricia, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. Thread Starter
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    Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    Did you know dogs? .jpg
     
  2. MarkP

    MarkP Out on the slopes Skier

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    There are no natural lakes in Maryland

    Q1: Is it true that Maryland does not have any natural lakes?

    A1: Yes, there are no natural lakes in Maryland. All of Maryland’s lakes are manmade by damming rivers. Some have been named lakes (e.g., Lake Habeeb in Allegany County and Deep Creek Lake in Garrett County), but most have been named reservoirs (e.g., Loch Raven Reservoir in Baltimore County).

    Q2: Did Maryland ever have any natural lakes in the past?
    A2: Yes. We know of at least one, and there could be more. The one clearly documented case is Buckel’s Bog, which was a 160-acre, shallow periglacial lake (actually a glade) that occupied the headwater region of the North Branch of the Casselman River in Garrett County during the late Pleistocene (19,000-14,000 years ago). [Reference: Maxwell, J.A. and Davis, M. B., 1972, Pollen evidence of Pleistocene and Holocene vegetation of the Allegheny Plateau, Maryland: Quaternary Research, 2(4): 506-530.]

    Q3: Why are there no natural lakes in Maryland?
    A3: There are about a dozen major types of lakes, meaning there are about a dozen ways lakes form. None of those is found in Maryland. Some 74% of all lakes are glacial in origin, but glaciers never entered Maryland during the last Great Ice Age. Glacial lakes may form in bedrock depressions gouged out by glaciers or in areas where detached blocks of stagnant or retreating ice sheets are surrounded by other glacial deposits, such as sand and gravel outwash. When the blocks of ice melt away, the remaining depression, known as a kettle, may fill with water to form a “kettle lake.” Other major types of natural lakes include those that result from faulting, volcanic activity, and landslides blocking a river.

    http://www.mgs.md.gov/geology/maryland_lakes_and_reservoirs.html
     
  3. LiquidFeet

    LiquidFeet Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    This is a great thread.
     
  4. geepers

    geepers Out on the slopes Skier

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  5. dbostedo

    dbostedo Asst. Gathermeister-- Jackson Hole 2020 Moderator

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  6. Jilly

    Jilly Lead Cougar Skier

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    There is a point on the US/Quebec border where there is a bar. The line on the floor in the border. So you can go the bar on the Quebec side and drink till 3am. The bar on the NY side closes earlier. The building is between the 2 crossing posts.

    Outside you can drink on the border post!!
     
  7. David Chaus

    David Chaus If I am skiing the world is a perfect place. Skier

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    Oxytocin (bonding and attachment neurotransmitter) is created in dog’s brains when they look into their human companion’s eyes, which is also what happens in human brains.
     
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  8. VickiK

    VickiK Getting off the lift Skier

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    The sea squirt eats its own brain for nourishment once it cements itself into its permanent location once it matures.

    This TED talk has nothing to do with sea squirts, but it does posit that our brains are built for moving. Hmmmm!
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2019
  9. geepers

    geepers Out on the slopes Skier

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    Where is that? Google didn't find it but did find this Stanstead/Beebe Plain house which straddles the border.

    1. It's a bargain (or was) - $109K for a almost 7,000-square-foot house (some TLC required).
    2. Some security/boarder issues brought on by the 9/11. The house has entrances from the United States and Canada. Border agents have come to know the people who live in the house and allow them to move back and forth freely as long as they stay in the house or the tiny front or backyard.
     
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  10. VickieH

    VickieH Out on the slopes Skier

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    Strangely familiar ... like some people once they cement themselves into their beliefs. Whodathunk.
     
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  11. KevinF

    KevinF Gathermeister-Stowe Team Gathermeister

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    The closest living relative of a Tyrannosaurus Rex is a chicken.

    Think about the number of T-rex great...great...great...great... etc. grand-children you're killing as you make scrambled eggs in the morning.
     
  12. Jilly

    Jilly Lead Cougar Skier

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    From the Quebec side it's Dundee. We always went by boat from Cornwall or Lancaster Ontario. DH grew up in that area. Been a few too many years. The place has probably been closed down after 911 or burnt to the ground!!
     
  13. ADKmel

    ADKmel Turning Skier

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    [​IMG]
     
  14. surfsnowgirl

    surfsnowgirl Instructor Skier

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    A stingray’s tail is located with a barb that can be serrated and sharp. This venom can be dangerous to humans and was used as an anesthetic in ancient Greece.

    I've been stung by a sting ray twice and that is pain like I've never felt before...…The scalding hot water the lifeguards put your foot is actually incredible relief.
     
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  15. Jim McDonald

    Jim McDonald Out on the slopes Skier

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    Crickey!
     
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  16. SkiMore

    SkiMore Booting up Skier

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    The words for the animals that are kept on the farm are often Germanic in origin
    - Cow->Kuh
    - Pig/swine -> Schwein
    - Calf -> Kalb
    - chicken/hen -> Huhn

    But the words for food that is prepared from those animals is often French in origin
    beef ->boeuf
    poultry -> poulet
    veal -> veau
    pork -> porc
     
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  17. Jim McDonald

    Jim McDonald Out on the slopes Skier

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    That's because the Normans made serfs of the Anglo-Saxons when they took over in 1066. A-Ss handled the livestock, Ns ate the meals.
     
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  18. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

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    Aside from history, The French know how to cook. :duck:
     
  19. Bad Bob

    Bad Bob old n' slow Skier

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    The Basque are considered to be a 35,000 year old culture +/-. Their language (not part of any other known language group), much of their music, and many foods have no known sources from a previous cultures. In the US you can be adopted into the Basque culture if you learn the language.

    Wonder where a lot of French cooking originally came from?

    If you have the chance go to a basque restaurant, very interesting meals. There is a good one in Winnemucca, NV if you are passing through. Winnemucca in the Shoshone language supposedly translates to "one moccasin" (now that is a worthless tidbit).
     
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  20. Thread Starter
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    Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    I didn't realize Canada was a different country until I was about 10 years old because we regularly went on Sunday drives and went across the International Bridge "The Sault" to sight see. I just thought it was another "state" because it was just our neighboring town/locale.

    One day in school our teacher asked if any one had been to a foreign country and I didn't raise my hand. My cousin told me Canada was a foreign country and I called her a liar :D
     

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