geepers

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Serious question. Some of those people are just getting worse trying to ski that line.
Well, there you go. After various comments I've posted re WC zipperline I thought you were trying to wind me up.:rolleyes:

Yes, those skiers are certainly out of their comfort zone. (With the exception of the 1st, smaller student it's a textbook example of over-terraining.)

However the point of the post was that a direct line does not have to be highly athletic.

Two clarifying points (in case anyone thinks I've totally gone WC zipper):
  • It will become more athletic the straighter/faster it is skied.
  • Pitch and bump shape may mean that ANY direct line will need athleticism.
 

James

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Well, there you go. After various comments I've posted re WC zipperline I thought you were trying to wind me up.:rolleyes:

Yes, those skiers are certainly out of their comfort zone. (With the exception of the 1st, smaller student it's a textbook example of over-terraining.)

However the point of the post was that a direct line does not have to be highly athletic.

Two clarifying points (in case anyone thinks I've totally gone WC zipper):
  • It will become more athletic the straighter/faster it is skied.
  • Pitch and bump shape may mean that ANY direct line will need athleticism.
Well my point is that teaching most of those people to ski that line just makes them more defensive. Bad habits become worse, they don't improve, except at failing. And for what? Thus, pointless.
Not to mention that direct line is so well set up you can get away skiing it non direct. But they still can't.
 

geepers

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Well my point is that teaching most of those people to ski that line just makes them more defensive. Bad habits become worse, they don't improve, except at failing. And for what? Thus, pointless.
Not to mention that direct line is so well set up you can get away skiing it non direct. But they still can't.
Well, think of it this way. When some-one says they ski direct line I used to automatically think WC moguls and ouch, my hips hurt. Now I have a range of mental images.
 

Josh Matta

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I would argue those people in that last video are actually being very athletic to do that hacktastic skiing.
 

4ster

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Wow, it's basically a free book on skiing bumps!
:ogcool:

FWIW, there are many in the PSIA world that didn't learn their skills there, and PSIA doesn't really care. If one already has skills, they're more than welcome. Deb Armstrong certainly comes to mind.
Along with Daron Rahlves, AJ Kitt & many, many more USSA coaches, former & current competitors. Heck for better or worse even HH was a member of PSIA at one time.
Why wouldn't any serious coach or teacher seek out every & any avenue/opportunity to hone their craft :huh: ?
 
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jack97

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I asked @locknload about this clinic a couple years ago.
Before this thread goes off the rails........ It seems to me that this clinic was on your mind for a while.The reply from @locknload resembles pms I had from campers in years past. A couple of things to keep in mind, if your really want to improve your skiing in moguls, you really have to own the short turns, doing the drills in the flat is when these movements go into muscle memory. The techniques such as the knee tuck, getting forward and loading that tip to bite has to be instinctive when the bums are coming at you fast. The common theme I hear from theses camps are they build up the techniques to make a mogul turn. Attach are two vids, one I already posted in the other thread but I think its important so I'll re-post this again. Its Smart talking about turns at 6:29, and you can see that knee tuck.



Second vid by Fearing. He coached the Canadian team, his techniques resembles that of Smart and the Canadian team during that era. Vid is full of other drills but IMO, the turn section is key.

 

jack97

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And yeah, books. If you're the type that likes to read.

DiPriro's book is a classic and was quite a sensation back at Epic. Its a great intro book and DiPiro purposely kept it simple because he felt newbies to the bumps had to process so much information. It was more important to just point out the basics so that they can become comfortable with them.
Everything-Instructors-Never-About-Skiing

A new book by Mead. More details and up to date info on competitive mogul skiing. It brings to light why the competitors are skiing the way they are right now. But more importantly it provides more details than what DiPiro covered.
Invincible-Mogul-Skier-Highly-Detailed-Advancement
 

Noodler

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Before this thread goes off the rails........ It seems to me that this clinic was on your mind for a while.The reply from @locknload resembles pms I had from campers in years past. A couple of things to keep in mind, if your really want to improve your skiing in moguls, you really have to own the short turns, doing the drills in the flat is when these movements go into muscle memory. The techniques such as the knee tuck, getting forward and loading that tip to bite has to be instinctive when the bums are coming at you fast. The common theme I hear from theses camps are they build up the techniques to make a mogul turn. Attach are two vids, one I already posted in the other thread but I think its important so I'll re-post this again. Its Smart talking about turns at 6:29, and you can see that knee tuck.



Second vid by Fearing. He coached the Canadian team, his techniques resembles that of Smart and the Canadian team during that era. Vid is full of other drills but IMO, the turn section is key.

The knee tucking is at 7:22 in the first posted video. (I'm still watching it and enjoying it - classic old school moguls).
 

jack97

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The knee tuck is still relevant, Mead calls it the "knee pocket" and coaches his athlete with this technique. For me, it a great way to get all that weight onto the new outside ski and load that tip. Equally important and mentioned previously is to make sure that inside leg doesn't diverge to far especially if there is soft snow on the backside of the bump.
 

James

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Have we ever discovered a full English version of Fearing's dvd's?
 

CS2-6

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A new book by Mead
The Mead book has come up in this thread, as well as in other places. Have you read it yet Jack97? It looks interesting but might be a little too technical for a TX-based mogul skier.

But speaking of books, do you have any reading summer recommendations? I've certainly read Dipiro's classic, and Elling's All-Mountain Skier, as well as Killy's Situation Skiing (but that was just because it was on my Dad's shelf), but those make up the entirety of my skiing studies.
 

jack97

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The Mead book has come up in this thread, as well as in other places. Have you read it yet Jack97? It looks interesting but might be a little too technical for a TX-based mogul skier.

But speaking of books, do you have any reading summer recommendations? I've certainly read Dipiro's classic, and Elling's All-Mountain Skier, as well as Killy's Situation Skiing (but that was just because it was on my Dad's shelf), but those make up the entirety of my skiing studies.
I have read Mead's book, it more technical than Dipiro's. IMO, The latter is invaluable since it breaks a lot of the misconception of skiing a direct line in the bumps. Mead breaks down some of the stuff from Dipiro and explains why it works. In addition, Mead goes into depth about hip movement, more so than Dipiro.

In general, Mead is more of an advance book and I have appreciated his insight. The main reason is I feel this way is because I can use the front of the ski to control my turns and more importantly control my speed. For example, Dipiro always mentions to pressure the front of the ski, however once you can do this and feel how much control you have, you will appreciate Mead. As I said before Dipiro purposely did not go into depth about techniques, he felt it was more important to keep it simple given he was writing this for newbies and dispelling the misinformation about skiing that direct line.
 

CS2-6

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Mead is more of an advance book
Excellent breakdown, I appreciate the review.

Do you think Mead's book would be a good one to read after Dipiro's, or is there another book you think would be better to graduate to first?
 

jack97

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Do you think Mead's book would be a good one to read after Dipiro's, or is there another book you think would be better to graduate to first?
The former, Mead's basic technique is the same as Dipiro's except more advance topics. The important item is to focus on what Dipiro and Mead outlined, forget about other books on (bump) technique, it will clutter the mind.
 

CS2-6

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The former, Mead's basic technique is the same as Dipiro's except more advance topics. The important item is to focus on what Dipiro and Mead outlined, forget about other books on (bump) technique, it will clutter the mind.
Thanks, man. I'd rather re-read quality texts than delve into new reading material of contradictory instruction and questionably quality.

I'll give Mead's book a try this summer, and then go back through Dipiro before ski season.

Thanks again.
 

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