What keeps you from taking ski lessons?

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by mister moose, Jan 10, 2019.

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  1. Ron

    Ron rebuilding myself one part at a time Pugski Ski Tester

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    ahh, the more you know means there's less to learn? :roflmao:

    Once you reach an advanced level of skiing, the improvements come from refinement. It may sound odd but the amount that you will need to refine is far more than what you needed to learn to reach that point, and in some ways, it can be more difficult.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
  2. Ken_R

    Ken_R Living the Dream Skier

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    That is still a a lot of $.
     
  3. headybrew

    headybrew surrender to the flow Skier

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    Threads like this are great there are several people showing signs of mental illness through their posts. I can only say this cause it takes one to know one!
     
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  4. Ron

    Ron rebuilding myself one part at a time Pugski Ski Tester

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    a lot cheaper than another pair of ski's. Again, what I am asking is "what's more important to you?"
     
  5. LKLA

    LKLA Out on the slopes Skier

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    Unfortunately there is a finite amount of money for most of us.

    I get what you mean but I think what a lot of people are saying is that their mortgage/rent, car loan, student loans, credit card loans, food, gas, home utilities, kids' tuition...maybe savings :eek:...are more important, make that necessary. And, that if they happen to have $900 "left over", that they see more "value" in something like taking the family skiing for the weekend than in spending the $900 on a one day private ski lesson.

    Btw, I am not sure buying skis is more expensive. A three hour private can run you $600. I think you can buy skis for $600, certainly if you buy used skis or old models. And, you might be able to sell them and recover some of your money.
     
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  6. Ron

    Ron rebuilding myself one part at a time Pugski Ski Tester

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    Value is relative. I am playing devils advocate. A pair of ski's regardless of cost will eventually need to be replaced. Mastery of skiing wont (until you need to be replaced :) ) And, yes lessons are not cheap. Again, 10-3pm for a small group lesson for $200 is a very good deal considering the overall cost of skiing in general. I would also suggest that 1/2 day lessons are a better way to go.
     
  7. Smear

    Smear Putting on skis Skier

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    To me it it cost. I would love to take more private lessons if cost was not an issue. Yes, skiing is an expensive sport and but I try to make it as cheap as I can and get as much enjoyment as I can of the money spent.

    Have taken 2 lessons in the past 13 years. The first one was included in a housing deal. The second one was an expensive 2 hour private last year. In absolutely horrendous conditions. Tracked deep slush that got frozen before the late evening private. But we did get surprisingly much out of it anyway despite of the conditions.

    My cost effective solution is race training for adults (masters). For the same price as a 5 h private I get access to 60 x 2 hour sessions (but going more than 1-2 times a week is ot realistic for me) . Not sure it's working. Training this week was a feast of ice and ruts and trying to get 185 cm, 25 m radius skis to turn without any success. Only first few and 4 last turns actually felt any good. The rest was sliding sideways on rutted ice. Didn't do much for improvement but it keep me dissatisfied with my ski technique, my fitness and my mental toughness and to me that dissatisfaction actually helps to keep sliding down groomers interesting....

    Will probably try with private lessons again at some point. If I can find an instructor that understands the cause and effects of my flaws, comesup with an progression to smooth them out and give me instant feedback on what I'm doing then I have high hopes that a lot of progress can be made in a couple of hours. That would be worth it to me even if very expensive pr hour.
     
  8. martyg

    martyg Getting off the lift Industry Insider

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    Smear - and others.... Hit a hill mid-week, non-holiday week. Sign up for a more advanced group lesson. You'll likely be the only one in the class.
     
  9. Seldomski

    Seldomski Paralysis by analysis Skier

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    One other thing I have noticed in advanced lessons is a bit of instructor sorcery... the instructor has you do a few drills to start that really wake up your feet and tune your balance. I often don't know why exactly I am skiing better during the lesson.
    1) Is it the balance drills and increased increased mindfulness (I am paying $$ to really pay attention to what I am doing)?
    3) Instructor aura (subconscious imitation of better skier)?

    So I have trouble teasing out if I am actually learning stuff that will carry over to tomorrow. If I can't carry forward better skiing because it only happens in the lesson atmosphere, the value of the lesson seems minimal to me.

    There's also the 'lunch effect.' Often in a lesson, my skiing reverts to garbage after lunch. I'd pay a big tip for a lesson that kept me skiing well after lunch...

    Edit to add: So this is why I generally feel that I need multiple days in a row with the same instructor to actually realize an improvement. That's a lot of time and $$ to dedicate...
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
  10. LKLA

    LKLA Out on the slopes Skier

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    The main reason why folks don't take lessons is cost. That is clear. Not that there was a need for a thread to confirm that, but this thread certainly has further cemented that fact (90%+ of reasons posted stated cost).

    Your point is a very valid one. Value is indeed relative - I completely agree. But value is not relative in isolation - it is beholden to what others in your sphere/world see as value as well. My decisions, including how I spend my time and my money, impact others, mostly my spouse and children. I am pretty sure how my family would feel if I took a $350 lesson instead of going skiing that day or that I signed up for a $900 private all day lesson and now the ski vacation had to be shortened by a couple of days.

    Of course if you don't have a spouse and kids you have more "freedom" to decide what value is and in that case I agree with you even more. But there again the cost is the cost is the cost and other reasons like lack of quality instructors, time commitments, socializing aspects of skiing, etc often come into play.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
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  11. LKLA

    LKLA Out on the slopes Skier

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    Something called work tends to get in the way of mid-week lessons:(
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
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  12. Chris V.

    Chris V. Getting on the lift Skier

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    The thing about lessons is, bet you can't have just one!
     
  13. Crank

    Crank Out on the slopes Skier

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    You just described the Taos Ski Week. It is a good product and is very reasonably priced.
     
  14. headybrew

    headybrew surrender to the flow Skier

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    One thing that has stopped me from taking lessons is I can not find what I am looking for at a reasonable price OR location. Where would a 40 YO man take park lessons? Seems like a private day at Woodward Copper is about the only option. I'd rather pay someone to teach me a progression of skills that would have me hitting medium park jumps by the end of a day (I've done it before and know I can do it) than one footed turning drills.
     
  15. François Pugh

    François Pugh Out on the slopes Skier

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    Quit drinking beer and spend the beer money on lessons? That's just crazy talk.:nono:
     
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  16. newfydog

    newfydog Out on the slopes Skier

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    I saw a survey back in the day before ski academies---no one on the entire US Ski Team had ever had a "lesson" learning to ski. I went the same route, never had a lesson until as a teen, I had my first race coach.
     
  17. Ken_R

    Ken_R Living the Dream Skier

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    Lets say I have spent about $4k in ski gear over the past 3 seasons (its probably less :crossfingers:). At 40-50 days of skiing per season thats about $25-$35 per ski day give or take... Add the passes and still at or under $50 per day with all new ski gear every few years...

    Honestly ski resorts should give away a good bit of lessons for free and pay the instructors a living wage at least. Its in their best interest to keep people safe and happy on the slopes...
     
  18. Stacks

    Stacks Stacks Skier

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    I surf and ski. Surfing is much harder. No one (virtually) has lessons to learn to surf. Time in the water, time around better surfers, time spent in more challenging waves. If you have the motivation and desire to get better you will. The old adage of the best surfer in the water is the one who is having the most fun also applies to skiing.
     
  19. mdf

    mdf entering the Big Couloir Skier

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    Don't eat lunch.
     
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  20. geepers

    geepers Out on the slopes Skier

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    Keep reading these posts about lessons that cost hundreds of dollars. Not sure about other mountains but where I ski in BC the walk-up price for a 2 hour group lesson is $75 (plus taxes) and a 5 day package is $334. And can typically get around 50% discount with a pre-season purchase.

    Not sure if they still have it but at Big White a 1.5 hour first track privates (start 8:30am which is hardly demanding) for $125. You can typically get the instructor of your choice up to and including CSIA L3s. (Don't expect CSIA L4s for that price.)

    I know places like Whistler and Vail are more expensive....but hundreds of dollars? Surely that's for the extended private lessons with premium instructors.

    My tip for those looking for great lessons at good prices is to find the instructors who are seeking the next level of accreditation and have a good show of getting it. Takes a bit of asking around and maybe doing a lesson or two to find the good ones. Then ask them when they are next on and which group they will be taking - and book that one.
     
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