Did you know? (Random things in life)

James

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Yeah, nah.

Oxygen. Kind of needed for our version of life. But too much also kills us. Our blood has evolved to capture the oxygen we breathe in and bind it safely to the haemoglobin transport molecule.If we breathe air with a much higher than normal O2 concentration, the oxygen in the lungs overwhelms the blood’s ability to carry it away. The result is that the excess oxygen binds to the surface proteins of the lungs - essentially they rust/burn. As, apparently, do the eyes and nervous system.

Not surprising really given oxygen is a highly reactive element.

Seems there's a case to be made that oxygen is poisonous but takes 3 score and ten (or somewhere there abouts) to do us in.

Also.....
Trace metals. Iron, lithium, zinc, copper, chromium, nickel, cobalt, vanadium, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Very necessary for the correct functioning of our cells. Too much is toxic.

Probably a load more stuff like this.
Ok, it looks like the definitions of poison take into account the dosage and the organism.
Like chocolate is poisonous to dogs.

On the oxygen thing, might take a while. Apollo used 100% oxygen once in space. After the Apollo 1 fire during a test on the pad that killed 3 astronauts, they switched from 100% oxygen at 16psi to 60/40 Oxygen/Nitrogen at 16psi. But only on earth.
This changed after launch over 30 hours time to 100% Oxygen at 5 psi and remained that for the flight. So that's 7-12 days depending on the flight.
https://history.nasa.gov/SP-368/s2ch5.htm#131

Skylab was 74% oxygen 26 nitrogen at 5 psi.
https://history.nasa.gov/SP-400/ch2.htm

I think that Mir and the Space Shuttle used what the ISS uses. Very much like earth.

The International Space Station is 78%Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen. 14.7 psi Basically like earth sea level.
http://www.e-missions.net/ssa/CH4-breathingonthespacestation.htm
 

geepers

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Ok, it looks like the definitions of poison take into account the dosage and the organism.
Like chocolate is poisonous to dogs.

On the oxygen thing, might take a while. Apollo used 100% oxygen once in space. After the Apollo 1 fire during a test on the pad that killed 3 astronauts, they switched from 100% oxygen at 16psi to 60/40 Oxygen/Nitrogen at 16psi. But only on earth.
This changed after launch over 30 hours time to 100% Oxygen at 5 psi and remained that for the flight. So that's 7-12 days depending on the flight.
https://history.nasa.gov/SP-368/s2ch5.htm#131

Skylab was 74% oxygen 26 nitrogen at 5 psi.
https://history.nasa.gov/SP-400/ch2.htm

I think that Mir and the Space Shuttle used what the ISS uses. Very much like earth.

The International Space Station is 78%Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen. 14.7 psi Basically like earth sea level.
http://www.e-missions.net/ssa/CH4-breathingonthespacestation.htm
Something something partial pressure.

So less of a problem where the O2 partial pressure is not too far off Earth standard. (20% of 14.7 psi?)

The bigger problem is activities where the pressures are multiples of that. Like diving under water and hyperbaric medicine. Oxygen toxicity is a catastrophic hazard in diving, because a seizure results in near certain death by drowning. The seizure may occur suddenly and with no warning symptoms. The times to stay within are relatively short: 45 minutes at 1.6 bar (160 kPa), 120 minutes at 1.5 bar (150 kPa), 150 minutes at 1.4 bar (140 kPa), 180 minutes at 1.3 bar (130 kPa) and 210 minutes at 1.2 bar (120 kPa), but it is impossible to predict with any reliability whether or when toxicity symptoms will occur.

Those who like to dive deeply know about effects of other gases including nitrogen (narcosis and decompression sickness). And various gas mixtures are used like nitrox (reduced nitogen) and heliox (replace some or all of the nitrogen with helium) to work around some of the issues.

Or you can do what I do and don't venture below 60ft. (Yep, did in the past, when all this stuff was less understood than these days. No bone necrosis so far, phew...)
 

VickiK

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If you use an Instant Pot to make hard-boiled eggs (eggs, 1 C. water, 4-5 min., partial natural release), they will peel like a dream.
 

Josh Matta

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Did you know the only animal on earth to make up stories are humans?
 
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Tricia

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Philpug

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There are just three days of the year where there are no scheduled major sports games (Baseball, Football, Basketball & Hockey), the day before, during and after the MLB *All Star game.

*this can be considered an exhibition game
 
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Tricia

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Did you know..
giraffe's spots are unique, just like a person's fingerprints are unique.
 

David Chaus

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A slug has approximately 27,000 teeth – that's more teeth than a shark. Like sharks, slugs routinely lose and replace their teeth.
 

James

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There are just three days of the year where there are no scheduled major sports games (Baseball, Football, Basketball & Hockey), the day before, during and after the MLB *All Star game.

*this can be considered an exhibition game
Lol. Mlb wouldn't like you calling the All Star Game not a major sports game.
What about Christmas?

There's also Wimbledon, at least 6 MLS games Wed, one Wnba game Tue and 4 Wed, tons of Nba Summer League games both Tues/Wed.
 

Philpug

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Lol. Mlb wouldn't like you calling the All Star Game not a major sports game.
What about Christmas?

There's also Wimbledon, at least 6 MLS games Wed, one Wnba game Tue and 4 Wed, tons of Nba Summer League games both Tues/Wed.
There are always basketball games on Christmas.
 

Uncle-A

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Did you know..
giraffe's spots are unique, just like a person's fingerprints are unique.
I don't know about giraffes spots, but I do know the spots on the whales tail AKA the Fluke are unique. The scientific people that study the whales use the spots to identify them.
 

CalG

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I think this is my favorite of this thread.
In training a pup, feigning hurt to your person when the play gets too rough is an effect tool. The pup/dog will recognize the situation and learn that too much is too much. Dogs don't feel pain at the levels we do. How else are they to learn the limits?
 

Posaune

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I don't know about giraffes spots, but I do know the spots on the whales tail AKA the Fluke are unique. The scientific people that study the whales use the spots to identify them.
On orcas there are not tail spots, but the "saddle patch" by their dorsal fins is unique. I used an online photo collection of local orca pod members to identify an animal that swam under the bow of our sailboat on the Salish Sea (that's the inland waters, including Puget Sound, of coastal WA and B.C.) a few years ago. His nickname was "Cappuccino."
 
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