Advanced technique videos

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by razie, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. razie

    razie Sir Shiftsalot Skier

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    This is the latest instalment from Projected Productions, highly recommended. Good skiing, good video production and varied points of view on advanced skiing topics !!!



    I have the first two as well and they are great!



    and my favourite:



    A lot of nuggets of wisdom and ideas from the top of the ski instruction world, pushing the sport forward! Totally recommended. These guys totally deserve the support and you get extreme value !!
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  2. Deadslow

    Deadslow Booting up Skier

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    Exceptional videos! Also have all 3.
     
  3. karlo

    karlo Out on the slopes Skier

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    Very nice @razie. Thank you. I went to find reviews. Not much. So I went to Vimeo on-Demand and looked them up. The videos' descriptions, as published at Vimeo OnDemand, by order of release are:

    Project Kitz (Project Kitzsteinhorn), July 2015, 1 hr 5 min, $20
    Project Kitz brings together 3 of the worlds best Technical Skiers that are individually recognised for their expertise in the ski industry: JF Beaulieu (Canada), Paul Lorenz (Australia) and Reilly McGlashan (Australia). In this film each of these prolific skiers discuss their thoughts and objectives when performing short and long turns. They also include exercises that assist with their movement patterns. Project Kitz offers 12 exercises to improve the advanced skier's short and long turns with some cutting edge skiing concepts and a lot of great skiing imagery!

    Project Hintertux, October 2016, 1 hr 27 min, $25
    Project Hintertux showcases 3 of the worlds best skiers and coaches from around the globe! Interski team member's, Andreas Spettel (Austria), JF Beaulieu (Canada) and Nadine Grünenfelder (Switzerland), share with you their objectives, insights and development in a range of turn types from shorts and longs, to off piste skiing. Each athlete is interviewed and gives a detailed descriptions of their thought processes and exercises that they have used to become the world's best. These exercises are interesting, fun and most importantly can be practiced by anyone! After the bar was set in May 2015 with ProjectKitz, ProjectHintertux has raised the bar to new heights in quality, entertainment and instruction!

    the Zillertal Project, April 2017, 1 hr 27 min, $25
    Some of the biggest names in the ski instructing world! Each a member of a national Interski Team, each a top level examiner and each looked up to by thousands of ski instructors, technical skiers and high level skiers around the world. The Zillertal Project is your chance to listen to these top athletes and coaches share their personal ideas and objectives in skiing and watch them demonstrate these concepts. They also offer some great exercises and progressions that have helped them get to where they are and are sure to progress your skiing.
    Jon Ahlsén: BASI Examiner, NZSIA L3, NZSIA Demo Team, Swiss Patente. Currently works as a coach for New Generation Ski School’s level 4 training program in Verbier, Switzerland. Also worked several seasons at Treble Cone, NZ.
    Jonathan Ballou: PSIA Alpine Demo Team, PSIA L3 Examiner, PSIA Alpine Committee Chair, PSIA Children’s, Examiner, NZSIA L3 Examiner, NZSIA Ski Division Committee (Education Coordinator). Current Director of Operations for the Aspen Mountains Ski and Snowboard School. Trainer at the Rookie Academy in Treblecone, NZ.
    Alex Taugwalder: Member of Swiss Snow Demo Team, Member of Swiss Snow Education Pool, Swiss Fulll cert examiner, former FIS Racer with Europa Cup starts, ISIA GS World Champion Pamporovo 2013, 3x Swiss Ski Instructor Champion GS, 2x Swiss Ski Instructor Champion Ski Cross, Vice Champion GS at Interski 2015. Coach and founder of Race Academy Ybrig.


    Anything you can add would be great!
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017
  4. hbear

    hbear Getting off the lift Skier

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    Without wanting to go need a PSIA vs. Race debate.

    Honest question, how do you find the technical discussion and techniques as they relate to the race side of things. In particular to how they relate to getting an athlete down a course set in the quickest possible time.
     
  5. razie

    razie Sir Shiftsalot Skier

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    That's a great question.

    It all feeds back: from top racers, through these guys and back to me as a coach and back to making some racers fast. As you see a couple explaining, they watch and learn from top racers, which they consider to have the cleanest and best technique, for good reason. Then they learn and talk about what they're working on, in their own words and there's always something to pickup, reinforce, different points of view or wording of the same concept etc.

    In the racer's world, there are three big dimensions of greatness and being super-fast: technique, athleticism and tactics. You can get ahead with reasonable technique and make up with great athleticism and tactics etc. Rarely, some will have all three and completely dominate the field and MS and MH are good examples.

    This explains why one needs to pick the models carefully and why technical purists will be able to find issues even with most WC skiers. However, even so, most racers, say at FIS and up will have good technique - usually far above recreational levels, because they intently and constantly worked on it for tens and hundreds of days a season, for many seasons. As a racer you rarely "just ski" - even free skiing is technical free skiing, with a purpose and drills and if you compound the effort of a driven individual to improve over tens of thousands of hours at one thing, you'll get a very good skier. You will not be fast with poor technique and often, even at the WC level, many of the differences are obvious differences in setup and "default" technique. Sometimes tactics.

    Anyways, the way I see it: in terms of technique, it is simple and all higher level coaches agree - as I've worked my way up and started working with and learning from higher and higher level coaches, including several experienced on the WC and similar, I have not met a higher level coach that does not agree on the fundamentals and it simply is (big secret of high level racing revealed... not, I think) around carving as cleanly as possible and especially at the top of the turn. And you will hear I think Ballou saying he's working on exactly that, to get a clean round arc.

    If you do a lot of reading and thinking to understand biomechanics, anatomy and physics as they relate to skiing etc, you can work it back from that simple single concept of carving the top of the turn and, using simple biomechanics, you'll discover all the elements of great technique - it's very much like Newtonian physics.

    And then you see these great skiers, doing pretty much that and using those top racers as models, figuring it out and learning and explaining in their own words things they work on and it's the same elements, like staying lower etc and it all feeds back into "clean" technique and then eventually back into making other racers faster.

    Not everything they say is applicable on a race course, for sure.

    But often, the freedom they have of being outside of a course makes their technique elements more visible and that makes them better models (good or bad) - if that makes sense. If you are to watch a racer, always choose to watch their free skiing or training at well below race speeds.

    The other thing I find relevant and this would be most important for many pros is... uhh... not sure how to put it without stepping on some taboos... high level technique elements are not in most coaching or instruction manuals I've had access to. Sure, the basics are and can explain everything - I'm sure you hear that on and on, but if someone doesn't tell you to do X, you'd never likely discover it on your own, and there's many Xs that need learned and reinforced as you work your way through them. There's also many cues and directions that lead you to X. Even if someone tells you to do X, you would not understand the range of motion required for great skiing and how coming short slightly on X destroys Y and without Y you can't carry speed through that gate combination etc! All manuals I've seen get fuzzy beyond the basics. Many reasons for that, including the fact that it pays pretty well to know these and be hired at this or that academy or national team... so then why would you put them in a 20$ book ... but these guys, in their talks, do touch on some of these elements - that you won't find in a manual.

    Also, because of that, most coaches and instructors that know these elements, do not have a standardized language or framework to communicate them: they were learned over decades of experience, during which the manuals and words have changed tens of times and it stands to reason that the more you learn from, the better your mental models become, including not just the technique, but how to teach it.

    So... like I said: it all feeds back, either if you're lucky, from some WC coach that teaches X or from these guys that watch and figure it out and then explain it in other words. And then you, the coach, improve some racer's technique and make them faster.

    The bonus, for me, is that then they take it and apply it to for instance all shapes and sizes of turns, like "korean turns" for lack of a better word. And that gives me a different perspective. And model: these guys don't do the standard "race turns", they do all shapes and sizes and it's awesome to watch, too.

    And when you think you've seen it all, you see Andreas killing it off piste with the 30m WC sticks :eek:
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017
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  6. karlo

    karlo Out on the slopes Skier

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    From having watched the full Project Kitz this evening, these videos are not about racing at all. They are full-on instructional videos for advanced recreational skiing. Here is my take on Project Kitz.

    Spoiler alert. When filmed, Paul Lorenz was 29, Reilly McGlashan was 28, JF Beaulieu doesn't say :)

    This 1 hour and 5 minute video has plenty of exciting high energy technical skiing that makes it worth watching for only that. But, it is first and foremost, an instructional video. The first half is about short turns, the second about long turns, with a segment on boot fitting by a master boot fitter. If you do not have the service of a boot fitter par excellence, skip over this segment so that you don't regret your regrets.

    JF Beaulieu speaks of both short and long turns in almost musical terms, the "quality of impulse", the "flowing of the skis" and how he achieves that through the timing of movement and pressure. He shares cues that he uses to accomplish these things. Lorenz and McGlashan do a switch, one talking about what he feels and one about what he does in short turns, then vice versa for long turns. For me, Beaulieu's musicality, and Lorenz's and McGlashan's feelings when they ski are what makes this video from an instructional point of view. The turn is like jumping on a "trampoline". We've all had instructions as to what to do. It's really hard to feel what the instructor feels, and hard for the instructor to convey that.

    The three also share some of their favorite drills for each type of turn. They aren't just let's-practice-skiing drills. There are drills that help the skier find the right angulation; to feel what it's like in a turn when the turn hasn't been mastered yet; to feel full range of motions that are needed, possibly even discover a range of motion one did not know one has. They highlight what one should seek to feel and/or cues for performance, so the learner doesn't do a drill just for the sake of going through the motions. Reilly McGlashan, if he were not a skier, would probably be a crewing on one of those super fast America's Cup catamarans. He loves the outrigger drill.

    This video is really worth watching if you want to get a glimpse in the minds of three top pros, not about what they think when they teach, not about what they think we should do, but about what they think and feel when they are developing their own skills. And, while watching we can learn a thing or two, or three...
     
  7. PTskier

    PTskier Been goin' downhill for years.... Pass Pulled

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    Beaulieu is a beautiful skier. English isn't his first language...and what he says is just word salad. (bash deleted)



    The good racers use the fundamentals of how the skis are made to function and how the body functions. This has been written about and taught at all levels from 1st day to expert by Harald Harb.
    Edit: remove commercial link
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2017
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  8. oldschoolskier

    oldschoolskier Out on the slopes Skier

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    @razie you are on the right track as to what makes the top skiers.

    It comes down to an instinctual response to an input. Here’s the rub, most instinctual responses are wrong and actual need to be learned correctly (this is learned muscle memory). This is what makes the difference between good and great.

    A good skier knows what’s right, but must think their way down to use the right actions and responses and may even do all of them but they are not the fastest because they lag because it not instinctual. Get these 1000’s maybe more action to not require thought is what puts one into the great level.

    Don’t think! Just DO!

    The easiest example of this is when I was training fencing (epee). I trained with a Polish Master Coach for a while. I was already an ok fencer and I spent 3 months learning one basic move (among others). Fast forward 31 years, haven’t really touched a blade in last 20 or so, however when I do, these moves are instinctive, there is no thought they just happen and happen correctly (muscle tone and speed is lacking but that can be recovered). I had maybe a 100 like that, the best had well over a 1000.

    As with skiing it is more than a 100 correctly patterned responses more like a thousands even 10’s of thousands and at the very end, a little luck.

    Don’t think! Just DO!
     
  9. Read Blinn

    Read Blinn lakespapa Inactive

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    That may be, but he has regrettable taste in music.
     
  10. razie

    razie Sir Shiftsalot Skier

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    ;)

    sometimes he nails it...
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  11. Mike King

    Mike King AKA Habacomike Instructor

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    @PTskier may not find JF to have much to offer, but I find his skiing to be exemplary and I've found a lot of truth in his "word salad." He has his own 3 part instructional video Project 2016 that I found to be very inspirational and valuable.

    https://jfbeaulieu.vhx.tv

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  12. markojp

    markojp mtn rep for the gear on my feet Industry Insider Instructor

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    As someone who is an extremely visually oriented learner, I take exception, great exception, to your notion that JF has nothing to offer. 'Listening' adds a other dimension. Kool aid is fine, but my palette prefers many wells.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2017
  13. 1chris5

    1chris5 Getting on the lift Skier

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    I love JFs explanation of "Dimensional Skiing" and interpretation of the carved turn in terms of three dimensions. He brings to life the concept of the "virtual bump" that Ron Lemaster explains in his book, "Ultimate Skiing." JFs video is how I further interpret @Bob Barnes infinity move with his awesom GIFs like the trampoline example.

    At first, I watched JFs video and I was appalled; I was thinking what is this kook talking about but now I get it and it's good. Dimensional skiing is a way for me to better understand the angles, balance and physics needed for me to go where I need to go and do what I need to do. As for Kool Aid - for inter-dimensional skiing one needs Electric Kool Aid to really take that next step with the infinity move. I'm waiting for that instructional video next. Maybe by Cheech and Chong. Cheers.
     
  14. karlo

    karlo Out on the slopes Skier

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    I've seen that JF video before here at Pugski. I think I get the bowl analogy now. The bowl is not spherical. It is like a salad bowl. The waist or pelvis stays even with the plane of the bowl's lip. The legs go side to side, flexing as the feet are at the center of the bowl, outside leg extending as the feet rise up the side of the bowl, which is the turn on a bank. I think.

    BTW, I think the problem isn't his English. The problem is my French. I get the sense that I am missing much.
     
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  15. karlo

    karlo Out on the slopes Skier

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    Last night, I downloaded Project Kitz from Vimeo OnDemand and watched it. I was going to watch the next installment, Project Hintertux tonight. But, after @PTskier posted the page, which has since been edited out, where videos and books can be purchased, I decided I should check out at least one of those videos. I did and this is my review of it. I want to preface this by saying that I have recently, through PM, been given some background; there has been quite a lot, at least in other forums, very heated and unhealthy arguments over teaching systems. I hope that this post does not trigger negative discourse. The objective here is not to judge any teaching system, it is only to review one instructional video. I selected a video entitled Anyone Can Be An Expert Skier 2. I chose it because the Kitz-Hintertux-Zillertal series is about advanced skiing, so I figure I should stay in that same vein.

    The opening statement sets the bar. The purpose of the video is to instruct skiers "to become expert skiers". (I personally hate the way "expert" is used, though it is used throughout the sport and I just have to accept it.) The focus is the development of the short turn using a "clear and thorough approach"; it is both clear and thorough. The areas addressed are balance transfer to the outside ski (referred to as the stance ski), upper & lower body coordination, maintaining skis at the same angles, and inside foot (referred to as free foot) management. Exercises to work on these elements are given with detailed instructions supported by video demonstration. Quite a number of them are the same or equivalent to those viewed in Project Kitz, for example hip rotation and angulation, except that Harb does it leaning against a wall, McGlashan does it sitting at the edge of a chair.

    One had better be ready and focused to watch this video. I made my first try late this afternoon, at a coffee shop, before dinner. I could not stay awake. I gave it another try after dinner. Much better. Project Kitz was about what the pros think and feel when they ski and drill. Expert Skier 2 is all about detailed instructions for one to follow. Almost like following a recipe, like watching a Martha Stewart video; no detail will be overlooked. At the end, the video sums up by describing the turn, to quote,

    1. Begin by tipping the free (inside) foot to an edge.
    2. Use the counter-acting movements of the hip and upper body to prepare your balance.
    3. Let the tipping of the free foot drop your body and hips into the turn - make sure your free foot stays light.
    4. Increase the flex of the inside leg so the ski can clear out of the way (of the body).
    5. When the turn comes close to completion, flex the outside leg quickly and aggressively.
    6. As the skis come flat to the snow...

    I don't want to let out the spoiler :), you'll have to watch the video. Before that summation, every exercise and movement is described in fine detail, along with reasons of the exercise and what to focus on; and, there's a lot to focus on. If one follows every instruction and masters every element, one will be a very good skier. But, one has to be the type of learner that can consume and digest instruction given in this way. I would hazard to say, most folks are not that type; I know I am not. However, having gotten to where I am as a skier, my way, watching this video I am nodding my head - 'yeah, I do that, I get this'.

    The video is not expensive, $8. But, it is 45 minutes long. Should you watch it? Yes, if you can absorb and benefit from highly detailed instructions and demonstrations. Hoping to get to Project Hintertux tomorrow
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  16. karlo

    karlo Out on the slopes Skier

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    lovely rhythm and skiing

     
  17. john petersen

    john petersen working through minutia to find the big picture! Moderator Instructor

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    thats a great response, Razie... very spot on.....what you said here caught my eye as I just read through a great PP presentation that talks about this quite a bit.

    Check out the dude that combined Newton's laws with human kinetics...Euler....it expands the knowledge even more....

    great stuff...

    JP
     
  18. razie

    razie Sir Shiftsalot Skier

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    cool - although it gets into some pretty complex differential equations there... and applying that to the kinetic chain - holy moly :eek: I wouldn't want to break this down per each individual joint etc. But certainly interesting.

    ...and yeah, vis-a-vis Newton, it's quite common to see the general 7 biomechanical principles used in sports (this is a nice presentation of the 7 https://prezi.com/sewhgcqyehfp/seven-principles-of-biomechanical-analysis/) adapted to skiing... however, I find that these are sometimes mis-used when applied to skiing. Specifically, even as it relates to Euler's models, skiing is a little different from most other sports because of gravity and the way we use it. So for instance, while in most of the sports I need to push against the ground to change direction, get impulse, swing the club etc and the harder I push, the faster I go... while in skiing, I just need to use the ski to create deflection. And the more I try and fuss and spend energy, the slower I go - in fact, we go fastest when doing nothing :D (kind'a explains why I like this sport, heh).

    :beercheer:

    do you have a model of Euler's applied to the kinetic chain with a skiing focus? that'd be interesting to look at -where's-that-nerd-emoji?
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
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  19. Pete in Idaho

    Pete in Idaho Out on the slopes Skier

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    Hi Folks. Sorry to get off the main point here but does anyone know where I can get some instructional video on the Pedal Turn? Appreciate your posts and knowledgeofx skiing. Sorry for the interruption and I would join in the conversation but am just a 75 yr old skier who is trying to stay Advanced. Thanks Petel
     
  20. Rod9301

    Rod9301 Getting on the lift Skier

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    Search YouTube for Remy and ski pente raide

    It's in French though
     

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