Prosper

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I'm considering getting the VMT82 in 165cm to replace my 12+ year old and very much loved Fischer Progressor 8+ 165cm and to relegate my meh 4 year old Nordica NRGy 80s 169cm to rock ski status. I've read just about everything on Pugski and the interwebby about the VMT82 and it sounds like it would be a good fit for me. This will be the narrow ski of my 2 ski quiver. My wide ski, Icelantic Nomad 115s 171cm are typically pulled out for 6+ inches of fresh, deeper crud and next day leftovers. I'm 5'6" 150lbs, 48yo, mid level 8 to level 9 (on a really good day), ski all terrain at moderate to fast speeds with modern technique. I'm an EpicLocal pass holder and ski 20-30 days a season. My preference is rapid fire SL type turns but do like to open it up at times with big, swooping, high speed railroad arcs. I spend a fair amount of time skiing with my 9yo and 10yo boys through the trees and bumps at slower speeds. How does the VMT82 handle at slower speeds and in the bumps? Does it have to be driven all the time or can it casually cruise and be forgiving? The Progressor 8+ is 72mm under foot, very responsive and solid feeling, lightning quick from edge to edge, a ton of carving fun and great in the bumps. It sounds like I'm going to be giving up some of that quickness for more off piste versatility. Does the VMT82 sound like the right ski for my quiver? Thanks!
 

Paul Lutes

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If you're replacing your 72 mm Progressors (that you seem to like very much), why not go with the V76s instead of the 82s? Especially if you lean towards tighter, SL turns - the 15 R of the V76 will bring a bigger smile than the 82s. Both skis are very, very good - it just sounds like the 76 is closer to your style.
 

coskigirl

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I just got a pair of the V82s in a 165 and really debated between the V76 and the V82. My final decision was based on the fact that it's rare that I don't get into something that hasn't been groomed and the 82 would be a bit more versatile for Colorado. I based this on talking to a few people on the PugSki test team that I know well and who know my skiing well. I too love short turns and these are definitely turny although I've only had them out for a couple of hours so far. I always have some big wide arcing turns in my day and they did fine there. I wasn't feeling up to a lot of bumps that day but in the soft push mounds as Eldora warmed up they were fun.
 
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Prosper

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If you're replacing your 72 mm Progressors (that you seem to like very much), why not go with the V76s instead of the 82s? Especially if you lean towards tighter, SL turns - the 15 R of the V76 will bring a bigger smile than the 82s. Both skis are very, very good - it just sounds like the 76 is closer to your style.
Since a 3rd ski for the quiver isn’t an option (unless I want to cause significant matrimonial disharmony) I thought the jump from a 76mm to 115mm ski would be pretty significant. I think most would probably recommend a low 90mm ski for a western 2 ski quiver given my powder ski. I’d probably be willing to give up a little quickness for a little more versatility. I’m guessing the 82 is significantly better than the 76 in up to 6 inches of new snow and crud. Any comments on off-piste of the 76 vs 82? @Philpug, @Ron any thoughts?
 

James

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If you only have two skis, one being an enormous 115 , the question is what fo you want to ski on all the time?
Probably you should move the 115 out. Rent when it's that deep. You loved the 72mm. See where this is going? Spirit of '76.
 
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Prosper

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If you only have two skis, one being an enormous 115 , the question is what fo you want to ski on all the time?
Probably you should move the 115 out. Rent when it's that deep. You loved the 72mm. See where this is going? Spirit of '76.
My Icelantic Nomad 115s are much more versatile than the width suggests. The ski is awesomely fun in 6+ inches of fresh and the deeper the better, very good in the crud and chopped at any speed I ski and can rail medium to long radius turns in all soft conditions. They’re nimble, super stable and really easy. I just got them at the beginning of last season and, even though I’ve only skied them 8 days so far, every one one of those days has been really remarkable. I really love these skis and definitely don’t want to give them up.

I think I could ski a low 80mm ski as my daily driver and with my kids. I was hoping the NRGy would be the one but it was just OK. It kinda felt vanilla in just about every way. It’s not a bad ski but just lacks character, oomph and the fun factor. If I was just skiing with my kids it’d probably fine. It seems like the VMT82 in 165cm could be a good compromise of high end carving, off piste lite, bumps, trees, easy going when with kids and quickness. I know I’m asking for a lot out of a ski but sounds like this is a pretty exceptional ski. The Laser AX sounds like it’d fit the bill but it’s way out of my budget. I also like the idea of supporting a smaller, local CO ski manufacturer.
 

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I have used the VMT 82 in. a 179cm as my 90% of the time Patrol/ Freeski. Honestly, its one of the best skis I've been on. It's smooth, predictable, easy but with enough guts to handle firm snow and beat up night skiing just fine. And, I've loved it in 6-12 inches of east coast late day crud (after/ during snow storms). You need to keep it on edge in thicker, soft snow (running it too flat can get grabby with the wide tip).

For such a carvy ski, they pivot easily. The tail design is stellar, they grip and support well but release smoothly.
They're not my first choice for tight New England trees (or my second choice), but with a little bit of room to turn, they handle quite a wide range of conditions.

Oh, I'm 5'10". 185lbs. I wouldn't ski them a millimeter shorter. You might want to look at the 172cm especially if you want to expand the off-piste envelope (or decide on the VMT 76ers).

I'm seriously thinking of pairing these with the Evolve 100 sight unseen based on how much I enjoy them.
 

Philpug

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I like both the 76 and 82, especially the quickness of the 76. Really neither is a bad choice but considering the gap between what this ski is to be expected of and what your bigger ski is..I would lean to the 82..unless you are to add a 90ish ski..like say the Evolv 90? ;)
 

Ron

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Since a 3rd ski for the quiver isn’t an option (unless I want to cause significant matrimonial disharmony) I thought the jump from a 76mm to 115mm ski would be pretty significant. I think most would probably recommend a low 90mm ski for a western 2 ski quiver given my powder ski. I’d probably be willing to give up a little quickness for a little more versatility. I’m guessing the 82 is significantly better than the 76 in up to 6 inches of new snow and crud. Any comments on off-piste of the 76 vs 82? @Philpug, @Ron any thoughts?
Read the post above from @Superbman and buy the V82 if only because you seem to want to venture a bit more off piste or ski more crud/leftovers. . You really aren't giving up any meaningful quickness and yes, you are going a bit more versatility. The reality is you could buy either and with a little adjustment, you would be equally happy. I have skied my Laser AX's in 6" and have had a blast but the 82 will provide a bit more float but honestly, either one will be great

@Superbman I skied the Evol 100 and its befitting of your name :). Its a superb ski in that its designed to be a charger in the class of the Bonafide, M5 and others but what I liked about the Evol 100 is that it's less burly in the tip, shovel and tail allowing the ski to be worked more easily. Under foot and immediately in front and behind the binding is quite still providing excellent stability and power but the extreme ends of the tips/tails have just a bit more softness. I skied it on 3" fresh and then piled skied off snow that transitioned from firm scratchy stuff to pushed cream cheese. I loved this ski and will be adding it to my fleet.
 

James

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The 82 it is!
Very nice flex on that ski.
I will say that the ski new should probably get a base grind. I would pretty much count on it.
Thanks to all for helping me split hairs.
 
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Prosper

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I like both the 76 and 82, especially the quickness of the 76. Really neither is a bad choice but considering the gap between what this ski is to be expected of and what your bigger ski is..I would lean to the 82..unless you are to add a 90ish ski..like say the Evolv 90? ;)
Thanks to all for helping me split hairs. This is one of the main reasons the 82 seems more appealing. The increased versatility seems like a bigger plus than the slight decrease in quickness and it bridges the gap better. If the 3 ski quiver was an option no doubt it’d a 70mm+, 90mm+ and current 115mm skis. But after divorce and loss of assets there’d be no resources for a 3SQ. Now to bindings...(which will be much easier).
 
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Prosper

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I will say that the ski new should probably get a base grind. I would pretty much count on it.
I get bases and edges checked on every new ski. My v92 was actually pretty close on the bases.
I've always just waxed and skied the factory tune. If it doesn't feel right, then get the bases and edges checked. The reviews have touted the factory structure and finish of the these skis from Liberty. @Ron sounds like you were happy with the 92s out of the wrapper. Next decision: to Phantom or not?
 

coskigirl

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I've always just waxed and skied the factory tune. If it doesn't feel right, then get the bases and edges checked. The reviews have touted the factory structure and finish of the these skis from Liberty. @Ron sounds like you were happy with the 92s out of the wrapper. Next decision: to Phantom or not?
I did Phantom on mine but mainly because I don't intend them to be my daily driver but also don't have the aforethought to get them waxed before deciding to pull them out for a day.
 
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Prosper

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I have a big family and about 7 pairs of skis that, apart from structure and grinds, maintain myself. I typically wax after 4-6 days of skiing depending on conditions so that's a lot of time in the basement for me. Not waxing my daily drivers should save me a considerable amount of time.
 

James

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I can tell you the factory grind on the V82 I skied was pretty bad. Thank goodness the day was sugar and loose granular. Full hard snow I would have switched skis. The dealer shop I got it from said it's par for the course right now from Liberty.
One can always hope.
 

Noodler

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I know the 3SQ is currently out of the question, but that would normally be my recommendation. Personally I find very little.difference between a high 70's skis and a low 80's ski. I just don't see much difference in more versatility, but rather more of a.drop off in tighter carving performance moving to most skis in the low 80's. Note that I have not.skied either of the skis in question.

Be honest with yourself about what kind of conditions and terrain you're mostly going to get this ski into. A low 80's ski isn't really an all-mountain ski in the West if you're venturing into softer snow areas.
 
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