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Monique

Monique

bounceswoosh
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Sorry, this is totally off track......meant to be funny.

There is a lady in our school district that rinses her mouth with hydrogen peroxide for teeth whitening......her teeth are so friggin white....they are like glowing.....She claims this home remedy as her secret to her unbelievably white teeth.

So if peroxide is frowned upon because it kills tissue.......this lady is screwed....lol
I think it's specifically for wound care.

https://www.webmd.com/first-aid/ss/slideshow-wound-care-dos-and-donts

Using hydrogen peroxide or rubbing alcohol to clean an injury can actually harm the tissue and delay healing. The best way to clean a minor wound is with cool running water and mild soap. Rinse the wound for at least five minutes to remove dirt, debris, and bacteria. Wounds that are large, deep, or bleeding nonstop should be treated by a professional.
(Obviously that last part may not be possible in the backcountry.)
 
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Monique

Monique

bounceswoosh
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Sorry seemed like a good post at 4:30am, obviously not. Have to rephrase it when I’m coherent after at long road trip.
I'm definitely interested!
 

Fishbowl

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I'm not sure if this has been covered, but it sometimes helps to consider exactly what you are prepared to do in case of emergency. Taking a "Course" usually suggests that you want to do more than Neosporin and bandaids, but how much more. If you are taking vitals do you have a stethoscope and BP cuff. Would you do CPR on a stranger, do you even have a face mask in your kit. Could you deal with an open fracture, an uncontrollable bleed, an amputation or avultion. Could you unblock an airway. Could you keep yourself or a victim dry and warm overnight, in the desert, in a snow storm. Will you be able to splint fractures, or dress massive wounds. Perhaps you may need to self rescue yourself and your victim. It's worth considering exactly what you are prepared, or likely, to deal with and then decide what you will need to deal with it.

The one thing I would have to have in my back pack is a roll of duct tape.
 

DanoT

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The proper use of peroxide would be for cleansing around a wound, careful not to get any in the wound thus avoiding damaging any tissue.
 

martyg

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Join the USAF. Tell your recruiter that you want to be a PJ. If you make it through the pipeline to the med school you will have all that you need.

 

Andy Mink

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I don't usually have a 1st aid kit with me skiing but while hunting or riding my side by side I carry a pretty well stocked trauma kit. We're often in the middle of nowhere Nevada and it can be a long time out for emergency evacuations. Two SAM splints (found out the hard way one isn't enough with a broken arm and ankle), QuikClot pads, tourniquets (the "new" ones are quite good), kerlex, eye wash, burn gel, band aids, peroxide, high sugar bars, scissors, tweezers, blades, etc. All in a super convenient pack in the utv. I also have a smaller, more personal size one for the hunt pack.
 
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Andy Mink

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I am likely going to pick up one or two of these. They look better than the traditional butterfly bandage. I know first aid is just that, first, but as I mentioned above it may be quite some time before we can actually get to 2nd aid.
 

SSSdave

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A bit more. An example of how duct tape and nylon cord can be used, lets say one slips on some grainy granite rock and skins an elbow making an immediate bloody mess. Remember your crash as a kid riding a bike on street pavement? If one also has ready say a Kleenix tissue, one can slap that against a section of the tape and then quickly wrap that around one's elbow with more pressure than any larger size bandage will that is key to stopping bleeding quickly so blood can coagulate. Add some cord around one's neck taped to an elbow and now one has a sling to keep it all still. Of course much more with joint and bone injuries. I will suggest about 50 feet of nylon cord since the weight and bulk is trivial. Also very useful in other ways like hanging wet gear on a line between trees to sun dry off.

Another key item not many bring is a first aid pocket guide book to actually carry for field use. Thus NOT one of the many books of large dimension with many pages that go into subjects deeply. Just enough info to deal with basic medical issues one might need to deal with. Search amazon with "mountaineering medicine pocket field guide". The one I have weighs just 3.5 ounces. Not many of us are regularly familiar with the way to deal with injuries and emergencies as say medical professionals even though one may have taken say a CPR training session 3 years ago. Being in a medical emergency has a way of affecting recall, especially if you are solo.

Also a small bottle of alcohol based hand sanitizer that are very popular and cheap these days. Another way it is useful in mountains is it readily disolves pine sap that may get on clothing and gear.
 

oldschoolskier

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It’s funny how those with rapid response Emergency services near by (never venture outside modern cities) view First Aid (ie do nothing more than a simple bandage) vs those that do venture outside those modern city limits (by choice or not) and view first aid treatment as whatever is required to survive long enough to get medical treatment.

Personally (I’m the latter) I’d rather hang out with those that are of the latter group as my chances are better.
 

oldschoolskier

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Your best Firstaid kit, is not a ready made bunch of tools and aids (even though they greatly assist and make life easier) but your brain and how you use it to solve the problem at hand give the tools and resources you have (or more importantly haven’t) to provide the level of Firstaid required.

Be inventive, doesn’t need to be pretty, just needs to work until proper medical attention can be provided.
 

Carolinacub

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Your best Firstaid kit, is not a ready made bunch of tools and aids (even though they greatly assist and make life easier) but your brain and how you use it to solve the problem at hand give the tools and resources you have (or more importantly haven’t) to provide the level of Firstaid required.

Be inventive, doesn’t need to be pretty, just needs to work until proper medical attention can be provided.
This is one of the first lessons I was taught in OEC. Granted it didn't come straight from the book but as a hard earned life lesson from the instructor.
 
Thread Starter
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Monique

Monique

bounceswoosh
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My brain is my favorite organ, but it's greatly augmented when I have access to a few carefully selected tools.
 

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