53’s Journey

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by Started at 53, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. Started at 53

    Started at 53 You can call me Jay Skier

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    In other sports forums I frequent have “Diaries” so you can log/catalog your progress. It is a cool way to keep track of my progress and get input from others who might be able to give tips or just exchange ideas

    So this is mine.

    Today was my first day on the slope, I won’t call it snow because I drove down to Miami to ride the magic carpet so to speak. Certainly not the real thing, but I thought why not, try out my new boots and get in a bit of practice in edging.

    You do 10 minutes on, 10 off and so on for an hour. The girl, and I say girl as she was only 18, did not really have a good idea of what I was trying to accomplish so there was a bit of trial and error, mostly error. She wanted to put the controllable pitch very steep and that just did not work out well. Essentially with the steep pitch I would just slide down to the bottom. There has to be a balance between speed and degree of pitch. But, she had the pitch too steep so unless I had the wedge/pizza going I would go straight to the bottom. I am new to this whole concept, skiing that is :huh: but especially indoor carpet skiing. It is a bit weird to say the least. The video below was actually AFTER I lessened the pitch a fair amount. The speed was “17 mph”. I feel for what I want to practice I need it with less pitch and a bit more speed so I can ski with a bit more parallel to my skis. Ideally you would stay in the same position on the “hill” and just carve from side to side. Ok, learning experience and I will get it dialed in next time. But here is my first day on the “snow” for the season.

    Goal was to pressure my shin on the boot and try to get the skis parallel (I explained the parallel bit above). I never felt like my calf was against the back of my boot, but often I felt it in the middle, so I would then push my shin against the front cuff. Hands are way too close to my body and not far enough in front which should help with the forward shin issue. I hate the wedging thing in these videos, but without it I would be at the bottom against the bar right away (see above).

    Go Pro was acting up, so this is phone video

    Part 1


    Part 2


    Edited to add: the boots felt great!
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
    Tricia, Snowfan, CrystalRose and 9 others like this.
  2. Philpug

    Philpug Enjoying being back on two wheels. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    It's a workout isn't it ;). This will be a fun exercise for you. @cbk learned on a ramp like this and I think it is a great start for you. I will not talk MA but keep it up.
     
    Started at 53 likes this.
  3. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

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    Wow. I've never been to a set up like that before. I think I would be unable to deal with having the bottom be so close!
     
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  4. Started at 53

    Started at 53 You can call me Jay Skier

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    It’s VERY weird to say the least. Forget about using poles on turns as that carpet is hauling a$$ and nearly jerks it out of your hand
     
  5. Uncle Louie

    Uncle Louie The Original Gathermeister Skier Team Gathermeister

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    For your first time on a carpet.....YOU are kicking butt dude !

    Skiing on a deck is a lot different than being out on the hill. The concept of using your edges (minimal steering) to turn is the same. The bigest problem on a deck is that things have a tendency to happen in slow motion. You set the edge.....wait a second then drift to the side with mininal rotation of your feet. It does take awhile to get used to.

    I have a few suggestions for you. Trying to stay forward (pushing shin against the front of the boot) isn't productive on a ski deck. It works, but it has you somewhat frozen in a slight crouch. Try to get pressure at the 10 O'Clock (rt foot) and 2 O'Clock position (left foot) when you want to turn. Otherwise stand pretty much neutral. Try standing a little taller than you are now and move your hands apart about 4-6" more or so. Rotate your feet less and try edging a little more. See how that goes.

    As soon as things get a little more comfortable try increasing the amount of pressure difference from foot to foot when you make a turn. A little at a time (or it results in a big surprise as you quickly sail up to the top of the deck)

    Very nice work !

    Did you experience any vertigo ?
     
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  6. Started at 53

    Started at 53 You can call me Jay Skier

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    @Uncle Louie

    No vertigo! So I guess that was good.

    Thanks for the suggestions. I need all the help I can get :)
     
    Philpug likes this.
  7. Uncle Louie

    Uncle Louie The Original Gathermeister Skier Team Gathermeister

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    No vertigo is very good. I'll bet that was a result of the 10 on 10min off schedule.

    You did well, they are tough to ski on.
     
  8. surfsnowgirl

    surfsnowgirl Instructor, Jeep Wrangler driver and winter lover Skier

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  9. green26

    green26 Putting on skis Skier

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    If you don't mind my asking, why did you want to start? I always think it's kind of brave to begin as an adult, and on the mountain I silently applaud folks that are new skiers. But I see just now that you have like 650 posts!
     
  10. Started at 53

    Started at 53 You can call me Jay Skier

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    Why did I start?

    Great question. I have always loved watching skiing in movies and I am an outdoorsman. I have worked outdoors my whole life, but in my younger years could not take a chance getting injured, plus I was a serious adrenaline junkie which upped the odds of injury. So I am older and less of a junkie, still love the outdoors and while an injury would not be good with regards to my job, I could work it out with my boss if it happens. BTW, @Mrs. 53 told me if I broke my leg today she was still going to Deer Valley in December :nono: At least I know where I stand. But, back to why I started... I like doing things with my wife, she goes/tags along with me on fly fishing trips to The Keys, we do some competitive pistol shooting together, but she does those activities to be with me... She has been a skier since she was young, but has taken some breaks through life.... I wanted to learn to ski to do things with Betsy. But what’s not to like, it is a beautiful sport, very spiritual and I am BIG into spiritual things (fly fishing, Archery, golf) and skiing fits in well with that type of thing. So here I am, 55 years old and super excited to be learning something new. Ahhh, learning something new... I love to have goals, I will tirelessly work to achieve a goal. I live for working towards said goal... It is a character flaw :roflmao:

    So there you go, that is why I am becoming a skier.

    I have a grand total of 6 days on snow and now 1 day on the carpet, so I am a newbie :yahoo:
     
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  11. surfsnowgirl

    surfsnowgirl Instructor, Jeep Wrangler driver and winter lover Skier

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    @Started at 53 i think you have the most awesome attitude. I started skiing on ski blades when I was about 38 and transitioned to longer skis almost 5 years ago.

    Cheers to learning as an adult

    :beercheer:
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
  12. john petersen

    john petersen working through minutia to find the big picture! Moderator Instructor

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    I think that looks like fun!...I like the fact that you shared that with us as clearly there is a learning curve to the machine, the surface, the short "hill", ect...

    I could see some good long leg short leg happening....a few other movements I saw were probably due to the situation and carpeting....so Ill keep those to myself until I hear more about your experiences.

    I think as you begin to relax and get used to everything, the hands and stance will become more natural.

    The fun part looked to be engaging the edges of your skis "just a bit more" and being brought back up the carpet......

    I did notice a bit of upper body lean (towards the outside ski) on your right turns preceded by a quick transition.....might show up in your regular skiing?...not sure....

    if its possible on that carpet, see if you can move both feet simultaneously to start the turn....which may help facilitate a christie.....

    curious as can be over here.....very intriguing machine!

    JP
     
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  13. cbk

    cbk AKA Carl ... Ski with great élan! Skier

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    Yes, in fact, I did get started on a ski deck (ramp, magic carpet, whatever you want to call it...) As Phil observed, it is indeed a workout - intuitive when you stop to think about the time you spend riding lifts vs. actually skiing.

    What it's really good for:
    • Learning, refining, and practicing basics
    • Working out muscles that otherwise don't get exercised like they do when you're skiing
    • Watch yourself in the mirror for visual feedback
    • It's harder (more difficult) to ski on the carpet vs snow due to differing physical attributes of the two surfaces, plus gravity won't really make you go any faster
    • Exercises like one-ski, falling leaf, thousand steps, and others - these are especially good for mid- to upper-level skiers
    • Speaking of which, try one of my (masochistical) favorites: balance your hands lightly on the bar for balance, lift one ski in the air and point it straight down the fall line, and make turns with the other ski back and forth; inside edge, outside edge. Try 10 in each direction. When you're comfortable doing it, change from a technical challenge (developing the skills and balance to pull it off) to a fitness challenge - now try 50 in each direction.
    What it's maybe not so good for is developing terrain challenge skills (dropping vertical, bumps, air, etc...)

    Best of all for me, living in San Diego, was ... er ... IS the fact that I can go about 10 minutes to the deck and grab some turns rain or shine!

    :thumb:
     
  14. Marker

    Marker XLTL Skier

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    Way to go 53! I started latter in life myself at age 50 in 2009. It's been a fun, but sometimes painful learning experience. I can be fairly stubborn and will doggedly work at mastering new skills from my lessons, but need that "Aha" moment to breakthrough to a new level. I now ski blacks routinely in the Poconos and often in NE, but still classify myself as an intermediate since I don't ski bumps well at all. I wouldn't say I'm a lesson junkie, but you can't beat a great instructor in my view.

    I have to say that carpet doesn't appeal to me at all, but good luck to you!
     
    va_deb likes this.
  15. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

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    Yeah, but you need a solid basis on groomers before you can develop these - and as I've learned, you can always learn more by going back to smooth slopes.
     
    cbk likes this.
  16. green26

    green26 Putting on skis Skier

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    Ruminating to myself, don't bother paying attention!:margarita:(I just now figured out the emojis - uh oh...) It's interesting - this reminds me of when I was in high school playing lacrosse. I would practice for hours with my stick against a cement wall, but once I got into a game, all of that went by the wayside. The cement wall was fun but was almost a different sport altogether. What's that saying about training vs. war? I have no agenda or point here, just thinking out loud.
     
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  17. cbk

    cbk AKA Carl ... Ski with great élan! Skier

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    One other thing about the deck, the slower you can do an exercise the more difficult it is and the better for your skills it will be. You can hide a lot with speed on the slopes...
     
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  18. PTskier

    PTskier Been goin' downhill for years.... Pass Pulled

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    Hand position...imagine you're walking across the slickest ice ever. Your body will put your hands in a natural balancing position, kind'a up & kind'a spread. That's where you want them for skiing. Hand position does little good but can do a lot of harm for skiing balance.

    Look at your position at about :44 in #2. It sure looks like you're sitting back with your center of mass over your heels or behind them. Other shots show this as well. Forget pressuring your shins on the boots. Instead, balance on the balls of your feet. Stand tall with loose joints, your hands out in that natural balancing position. Hinge forward at your ankles. You want your body center of mass somewhere just a bit forward of your toe bindings. You'll feel like you're headed for a nose dive...but you'll be in balance and in control. (And, we all feel like we're doing more than we're actually accomplishing.) You'll recognize pressure on your shins as an indicator of how well you're getting forward, not as a goal of its own.

    Are you just in the wedge stage? Please do not develop a strong habit of skiing that way. It's OK as a lift line speed control device, but otherwise you want to start skiing parallel right away. Do not learn wedge christie turns where you put one ski out then match it with the other ski. It worked well for Sondre Norheim from Christiana, Norway, (today's Oslo) in 1850 when he used that turn to win a ski race. It was improved in 1910 by Hannes Schneider. I believe you have better equipment and do not need to learn that movement. Never learn anything you'll have to un-learn to progress, and the wedge christie turn is a very limiting movement. I'm not sure the carpet is a plus to learn skiing, although cbk has some good suggestions.

    On very easy real snow, to start parallel turns---in your wedge turns, learn to move your body around. Move to the left so your right ski is very light on the snow. Move to the right so your left ski is very light on the snow. Move your body forward by hinging forward at the ankles. Twist your body to the right, then to the left, and keep your feet side by side, not one pushed ahead. Make a right wedge turn by moving your body to the left so your right ski is light on the snow. Move forward with a bit of a twist so your zipper tab seems like it is over your left ski logo. Your skis will turn you to the right. Even up, then repeat to the other side, left ski light on the snow, zipper tab over the right ski logo, and your skis turn you left. Still on very flat, easy snow, keep your skis parallel. Make the same movements and turn your feet the direction you want to go, skis parallel & side by side, body moving to one side and your feet twisting to the other side. You are making parallel turns. Even better, for a right turn, do all than and tip your light right foot so the big toe edge is a bit up in the air. Easy right turn. Repeat everything the other way...body over the right ski, body twisted a bit right and forward over the right ski logo, tip the light left ski so your left big toe side is in the air, you're making easy left turns. It really is that easy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
  19. Started at 53

    Started at 53 You can call me Jay Skier

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    @PTskier

    I was forced to wedge because the “hill” was set up incorrectly. As @cbk mentioned, I want the hill to have less slope and more speed so I can slowly work on my technique. I marked things on the wall so I know where I want to start the slopes incline next time. I was forced to wedge as the slope/speed combo was such that otherwise I would end up at the base right away.

    Thanks for the tips
     
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  20. HDSkiing

    HDSkiing Getting on the lift Skier

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    Hey 53, love your enthusiasm!

    I have never tried to ski on one of those contraptions So I won't attempt an MA, Lol.

    There are tons of drills and techniques that can always be employed, many mentioned here and it's easy to feel overwhelmed, then as soon as you master one aspect you will discover new things that may in turn feel overwhelming.

    When I go out with a student I always try to concentrate on one or two things, often stepping back and revisiting a fundamental ( in my own skiing as well). It's like eating an elephant, you take one bite at a time.

    Skiing is a life long endeavor and perfection is unattainable but the pursuit of it can be a lot of fun and tremendously rewarding. It's also one of those activities that takes a lot of time on snow (or a moving carpet?).

    Techniques can be explained and demonstrated but often the person may not have yet developed the muscle memory or muscular endurance to perform a given task on a given terrain.

    Keep getting instruction, preferably one on one as nothing will help you progress faster. Keep in mind progressions might take different paths and come slower as you advance.

    Most importantly have fun! Often we can get real technical in the pursuit of this activity and forget to look at the mountains and natures beauty, I've been guilty of that myself. Some of the best advice I got from another instructor was to leave our seriousness down the mountain when we go up it keeping in mind while there is no "right way" to ski there are better ways:).
     
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