2019 Head

Discussion in '2019 Reviews by Brand' started by Pugski Test Team, Feb 17, 2018.

  1. Pugski Test Team

    Pugski Test Team Testing skis so you don't have to. Pugski Ski Tester

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    19 iMagnum.png
    Head Supershape iMagnum
    Dimensions: 131-72-110
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 149, 156, 163, 170, 177
    Size tested: 170
    Design: Carryover/NGT

    Philpug: The Supershape i.Magnum unfortunately suffers from middle-child syndrome. When there was just the Supershape i.Speed, it had a following. Then Head introduced the “wide” Supershape i.Magnum. Wide? Yes 71 mindblowing millimeters underfoot. Then came the Titan and the Rally, and the Magnum became, let's say, less popular. Yes, this is a shame because the i.Magnum is just as good as it ever was.
    • Who is it for? Technical skiers who don’t always want to use their A-game.
    • Who is it not for? “Me too” skiers; no worries, just get the i.Rally
    • Insider tip: Most shops are stocking the Rally and Titan, so it still takes some work to find these on the racks.

    19 iRally TC.png
    Head Supershape iRally
    Dimensions: 136-77-115
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 156, 163, 170, 177
    Size tested: 177
    Design: Carryover/NGT

    Andy Mink: There’s a reason the Supershape iRally is so popular: it flat out rips on groomers, from soft and chalky through recycled hard pack. Unchanged for 2019, the Rally boasts width underfoot between 74 and 77 mm depending on length. All lengths have a turn radius less than 15 m. What does this mean for the intermediate to advanced skier? You can lay track for Union Pacific! The wide shovel pulls you into the turn. The farther you lay the ski over, the more the tip engages.

    While the Rally doesn’t demand that you ski hard, it prefers that you do. It will tolerate intermediate-level mistakes, but not big ones. This is a ski at the edge of advanced/expert level. If you desire to ski hard and fast with lots of turning on the groomers, this is definitely a ski to consider.
    • Who is it for? The skier willing to go at least 8/10 all day.
    • Who is it not for? The cruiser who likes to grab a few trenches now and then but is happy just being on the hill.
    • Intermediate tip: If you want to save some money and aren’t planning on skiing hard all the time, take a look at the Head V8 or V10.

    Philpug (from last year): Head took the very successful iSpeed and iRally and gave them more direction, more purpose. The addition of Graphene, a new profile, and a new tip shape has resulted in a more technical feel for these Supershapes.
    • Who are they for? Technical skiers. If you measure your fun with each turn, these are your sticks.
    • Who are they not for? Those who like making figure 11s.
    • Insider tip: Instructors, these make most any turn shape at any speed. Great teaching skis.

    Drahtguy Kevin (from last year): More sidecut and the addition of Graphene kick this venerable offering up a notch. Multiple turn shapes, varying speeds, and versatility make the Rally a Head turner.
    • Who is it for? Technical skiers and those looking for a more piste-biased ride.
    • Who is it not for? People who don't enjoy turning.
    • Insider tip: A wonderful ski to help increase skills and confidence.

    FairToMiddlin (from last year): I owned a 2016 177 Rally, and it is a fine "easy SL" ski. The new Rally is altered sufficiently to be called new, but has enough of its predecessor that a blindfolded test would be a challenge. (Note: pugski.com does NOT recommend that you ski blindfolded. But if you do, please video it for our entertainment.)

    Its difference lies in feel. Perhaps it is the Graphene, I am not ready to get on that bandwagon, but it is a quieter, less vibrate-y Rally, not that the last one was bad at all. Apart from that, it has the same "sub-cheater GS" sidecut, which is why I call it an easy SL. The tip looks different from this year, but still initiates very well; tip the ski and it engages, and a smile appears on your face with the response. It has a hint of rise that resists tip dive off piste, a versatile mid-70s ski. I would place its off-piste skills above the 174cm Renoun Z-90 that I skied a few days after the SIA test.
    • Who is it for? A World Cup SL owner who wants an all-mountain alternative, something a bit more forgiving, a little less "Jane, stop this crazy thing!" than your SLs that want to arc endlessly down the fall line, but aggressive enough to lay the trenches you're used to.
    • Who is it not for? If you aren't comfortable being on edge, a lot, this might not be for you. A more sedate alternative, incredibly, would be the outgoing Kästle MX78 (I own that, too), which is also very “quiet" and damp.
    • Insider tip: The 177cm is the reference length; 184 is probably reserved for 11/10th skiers, and the 170cm gives up some of the forgiveness, brings it back toward the SL ski (the 170 has a 13m radius) that you probably already have.

    19 iTitan.png
    Head Supershape iTitan
    Dimensions: 138-81-118
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 156, 163, 170, 177
    Size tested: 177
    Design: Carryover

    Philpug: In its third year on the market, the i.Titan has become the darling of the Supershape collection. The wide-body ski does everything and is suited for skiers who want to ski a multitude of conditions with a technically biased ski. This is the reference ski in this category, and for good reason.
    • Who is it for? Like the Magnum above, technical skiers who want to relax from time to time.
    • Who is it not for? At 80 mm underfoot, you give up some quickness.
    • Insider tip: When in doubt, go with the smaller of two sizes.

    FairToMiddlin (from last year): I picked this as my reference ski, a ski I knew from last year and could use to get a feel for the snow conditions, then use as a benchmark for everything else to follow. It is a hard act to follow; it is a great ski on sale this year, and Head was wise enough to leave it alone for next year. At 81 mm underfoot and a 15m sidecut, it boasts fantastic hard-snow chops; it initiates the new turn with just a whiff of tipping onto edge, then pulls across the hill with power and enthusiasm. The fun continues off piste, as it excels with maneuverability and composure that is beyond its mission statement. If I had not tracked down and purchased the Blossom White Out in the off season, this would be my top pick for the narrow end of a two-ski travel quiver, no question.
    • Who is it for? Skilled pilots wanting versatility out of a carver, and improving skiers who need immediate feedback as they try new techniques.
    • Who is it not for? Lazy skiers. This is a highly trained Vizsla, not a lap dog.
    • Insider tip: This ski can be skied a size longer, and still feel nimble; I thought I was on the 170, until I looked at the tail and saw the 177. Yet, far from being skittish, it was merely quick (while being very confidence inspiring).

    Ron (from last year): The iTitan was my first ski on snow for the testing -- and I'm glad I had that third cup of coffee. Still a class-leading ski for those who want to tip and rip, it demands a skilled pilot to bring out its fighter-jet abilities. I love its supreme feel: stable and precise with virtually no speed limit. The Titan has a trick up its sleeve, though: you can take it into soft, broken snow, too! Even with a squared-off tail, it can be skied on edge and released when needed.
    • Who is it for? Skilled carve-aholics who venture off the groomed.
    • Who is it not for? If you can't leave two parallel rails when you ski, no need to apply.
    • Insider tip: Don’t be afraid to go to the 177.

    19 V8 TC.png
    Head V-Shape V8
    Dimensions: 130-75-112
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 149, 156, 163, 170, 177
    Size tested: 170
    Design: All New

    Andy Mink: The all-new Head V8 should be a force in the intermediate to advanced market. With a shape similar to the very successful Supershape series, the V8 is a carving machine; at the same time, it is not as demanding as its iBrethren. It is one of those skis capable of giving more when pressed, but it doesn’t need to be skied hard to perform well. It easily makes tight or wide turns and, with a little tail and tip rise, can be pushed around as the snow softens. The rounded tail will not beat you up in the bumps.

    Filling the next-to-top spot in the V-Shape series (V2 through V10), the V8 will appeal to those advancing skiers who stay mainly on the groomers but may venture a little onto the shoulders of the runs. Like the omnipotent V8 engine, this V8 can be used to cruise or rip, your choice.
    • Who is it for? Intermediate to advanced skiers looking for near-iPerformance at a friendlier price point.
    • Who is it not for? The skier who spends most of the day in the bumps, trees, or pow.
    • Intermediate tip: The V8 is a great ski for those who want to hone their carving skills but don't want to carve all the time.

    Doug Briggs: This 75mm-waisted ski is a solid performer. It has good grip and is pretty turny. The V8 is very playful but it does have its limits.
    • Who is it for? Folks who like to make a lot of small turns.
    • Who is it not for? People who like to rip big turns on the groomers.
    • Insider tip: This is an iRally for the intermediate to advanced skier.

    Philpug: The V8 was the SST (Surprise Ski of the Test) for me. At 76 mm underfoot in the reference 170 size, it could be the perfect instructor's ski. Narrow enough to be quick edge to edge. Soft enough to allow the skier to ease into a turn at a slow speed. Stable enough to let 'er run when needed. So, if you are looking at a Supershape but feel like you just don’t need all that power, the V8 could be the one.
    • Who is it for? Wannabe instructors that want but don’t need nth-degree precision.
    • Who is it not for? Bigger or stronger skiers who want to charge. No worries, there is the i.Titan.
    • Insider tip: Err on the short side.

    Ron: At 76 mm underfoot, the V8 is a bit softer and more user-friendly than the Rally but still provides a huge bandwidth of performance. Head seems to have created a ski that does what few other skis can do; it super easy to ski but has a high level of performance and exactness. If you are a lighter skier or just don't want the ponies that are found in the Supershape series, put this ski as No. 1 on your demo list (next to the V10). Easy turn entry but still precise, the tail won't punish you but can hold a turn at speed. The V8 still packs tons o' fun and plenty of performance. I really liked how much fun this ski was while still able to dish out a high level of performance with plenty of stability.
    • Who is it for? Lighter skiers or those who don't want a demanding ski but still want a something that is precise and skis like a much more serious ski.
    • Who is it not for? Probably not the best choice for Clydesdales, hard chargers, or those who don't like to have their skis on edge.
    • Insider tip: The V-Shape delivers a surprising level of performance with considerable ease.
    Tricia: Every once in a while I get to ski a ski that surprises me. The V8 is one of those skis. Head has been known to make strong carving skis for the aggressive corduroy junkie, so you may not think that they need to add more tools to their carving toolbox, until you click into their V8. For someone who's a light weight like me, this was soft enough to bend, while not wimpy, and narrow enough to carve precise turns without demeaning that I make every turn precise. This is one of those skis that is an easy choice for the skier who wants a great corduroy carver without committing to the more aggressive carvers that tend to fill this part of the ski wall. In fact, if I were an instructor, I think this would be a great pick for the job.

    • Who is it for? A finesse skier looking for a compliant carving ski
    • Who is it not for? An aggressive, heavy or hard charging skier
    • Insider tip: Don't overthink it

    19 V10 TC.png
    Head V-Shape V10
    Dimensions: 139-85-121
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 163, 170, 177, 184
    Size tested: 170
    Design: All New

    Doug Briggs: I hadn’t skied Heads lately, and after skiing this one I kind of regret it. I really enjoyed these skis. They are turny and stable at speed. You can ride them fast and furious, and they will just say, "That’s all you got?" I didn’t get to ski them in softer snow, but I suspect that with their 85mm waist, they do quite nicely in crud and off piste, too.
    • Who is it for? Hard-charging skiers who want a high-performance ski.
    • Who is it not for? Wimps. These skis want to go!
    • Insider tip: Fun, stable, and boy do they want to turn.

    Drahtguy Kevin: The V10 is billed as a “Titan Light,” and it is. A big shovel makes it easy to carve precise turns, and it isn’t overly demanding to pilot. Advancing intermediates will like this ski’s forgiving nature and ability to make a variety of turn shapes.
    • Who is it for? Those looking to improve their technical skiing.
    • Who is it not for? This ski doesn’t have the strength needed by larger chargers.
    • Insider tip: The V10 would make an excellent instructor ski.

    Philpug: The V10 is the flagship of an all-new collection that splits the difference between Supershapes and Monsters. The V10’s reference size is 85mm underfoot, making it the most all-mountain of the top levels. The softer-than-Monster flex and wider-than-Supershape tip make the V10 a very easy ski to engage into a turn and fun at slower and all-but-the-highest speeds. Head nailed this new shape that is nothing like the other offerings in this class.
    • Who is it for? Those who like to turn … a lot.
    • Who is it not for? Bigger and stronger skier; fret not, Head makes the Monster 83/88 for you.
    • Insider tip: If you cannot afford a Renoun Z-90, here is your new bargain alternative.

    Ron: At 85 underfoot, the V10 is much easier than the Titan. I draw the comparison to the Titan only as a reference point for the width and some general commonalities. Like the V8, the V10 is super easy to ski but has a high level of performance and exactness. Compared to the Titan, it is much less demanding. It likes to turn even more and is much more playful but still provides a huge range of performance. If you are a lighter skier or just don't want the ponies that are found in the Supershape series, put this ski as No. 1 on your demo list (maybe along side the V8?). Easy turn entry but still precise, the tail won't punish you but can hold a turn at speed. It can be drifted, too! The V10 still packs tons-o-fun and plenty of performance. I really liked how much fun this ski was while still able to dish out a high level of performance with plenty of stability. The V10 has a bit more all-mountain ability but not nearly as much as the new Monster 83 (see review). Of the two V-Series skis, I preferred this one.
    • Who is it for? Lighter skiers or those who don't want a demanding ski but still want a something that is precise and skis like a much more serious ski.
    • Who is it not for? Probably not the best choice for Clydesdales, hard chargers, or those who don't like to have their skis on edge.
    • Insider tip: The V10 delivers a surprising level of performance with considerable ease.

    19 Monster 83 TC.png
    Head Monster 83
    Dimensions: 131-83-110
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 149, 156, 163, 170, 177
    Size tested: 177
    Design: New Construction

    Drahtguy Kevin
    : I heard much buzz about this ski from other Pug testers so I wanted to see what it was about. A new tip shape, build, and flex pattern are in store for 2019, and Head got it right. Snow feel is spectacular. The new tip and flex make the ski easy to maneuver at a variety of speeds and supply the bang I so enjoy at the end of the turn. Seems year after year that Head is leading the pack, and the Monster 83 will keep that streak alive.
    • Who is it for? People wanting a versatile ski that is at home anywhere on the mountain.
    • Who is it not for? Skiers seeking a specific tool. This is the Leatherman of skis.
    • Insider tip: Skis true to size.

    Philpug: Head is not a company to rest on its laurels. The Monster 83, although not the most globally popular model in the Monster collection, has been a darling of Pugski readers. For 2019, Head revamped the 83 with a new shape, a revised balanced flex, and a tighter sidecut.

    On the snow, it feels even more supple and smoother than the outgoing model -- which was already supple and smooth. The tighter turn radius makes the Monster even quicker than before, and tip engagement is even more responsive. Where the old model’s stability was its cornerstone, the new model doesn’t sacrifice that but is much better at lower speeds.
    • Who is it for? Those who appreciate refinement.
    • Who is it not for? Still the meek; the V10 is for you.
    • Insider tip: As good as the last generation was, this one is indeed worth the price difference.

    Ron: For 2019, Head revised the entire line of Monsters. I wish Head would rename the line as "Monster" really isn't accurate. A few iterations back, the Monsters were quite a bit more monster-ish, but now they are more refined and easier across the line. Some may say Head neutered the line, but I think they have been a work in progress (as seen by three revisions to the venerable 88 in four years). I think they got it right this time with tweaks to the shape and overall feel of the skis.

    The new 83 is a fantastic ski, maybe my favorite ski of SIA. It always was a really good ski but now its a fantastic ski that should be a big hit. The 83 has a very nice even and smooth flex that engages very well. It performs so well that you might want to consider this ski when looking at wider carvers. It engages and pulls you into the turn taking skier input along the way. At the same time, it cranks out short- and medium-radius turns with aplomb and can be drifted very well. Its also quite stable and has a nice blend of dampness with enough energy and pop for fun (not as much pop as the Rossignol 84). The 83 is slightly more frontside oriented so it could be a superb East Coast all-mountain ski. I could own this for western skiing as well. Nice job Head!
    • Who is it for? East Coast all-mountain skiers; Western skiers looking for a high-performing frontside-oriented ski that can still take on a few inches of fresh and bumps.
    • Who is it not for? Not for the large or hard-charging skiers.
    • Insider tip: Include this ski if you are looking for a wider carver. While not a true carving ski, many will find it to do the job with some added versatility.
    Tricia: (163) The Head Monster 83 is a ski that has never been on my radar to review, if for no other reason than it's a unisex ski that has had a lot of coverage from other Pugski testers, and I've always had a big list of women's-specific skis to get through. This year I made a point to get on a few unisex skis, starting with the Monster 83; it proved to be fun, quick turning, and stable in a variety of conditions, from the refrozen conditions at the top of Mammoth to the softening conditions near the base. I have a new appreciation for the Monster 83 for men and women alike.
    • Who is it for? Someone looking for a quick-turning ski that is stable in a variety of conditions.
    • Who is it not for? Someone looking for a nimble cruiser.
    • Insider tip: Ladies, don't be afraid to give it a try if you're looking for a strong, stable, all-mountain ski.

    19 Monster 88 TC.png
    Head Monster 88
    Dimensions: 133-88-114
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 163, 170, 177, 184
    Size tested: 177
    Design: New Construction

    Philpug: The Monster 88 has become my reference ski in the 88-90mm category. What does that mean? That it's the best ski or the one that all others are compared against? Not really; it is the ski that I test the testing environment with. So, my first run of the day is on the Monster 88 because for me, it is one of the most predictable skis not only in the class but on the market.

    Predictability. Is there really anything more you can ask from a ski? No one likes unnecessary surprises. We don’t like driving down the road and having a wheel fly off of a car and be told, “Surprise, I loosened your lug nuts." No, I want a ski that when I take it out I know exactly what it will do. Occasionally I give one of our members a hard time because he always recommends the Monster 88, no matter what. Most of the time he is correct, and that is for the reason I stated: it is just a damn good ski that is usually a safe bet.

    For 2019 we see a change in the Monster: it has a slightly softer and balanced flex and a new tip shape. On the snow, its feel is just what you would expect: predictable.
    • Who is it for? Those who appreciate refinement.
    • Who is it not for? Where in the past you needed your A game, a good solid B+ game will suffice here.
    • Insider tip: Like the Monster 83, as good as the last generation was, this one is worth the price difference.

    19 Kore 93 TC.png
    Head Kore 93
    Dimensions: 133-93-115
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 153, 162, 171, 180, 189
    Size tested: 180
    Design: Carryover/NGT

    Drahtguy Kevin (from last year): Super light both afoot and in hand, the Kore 93 is nimble yet stable and dependable in steep, bumped-out terrain. The tip made getting into turns easy no matter the snow type. The Kore’s even flex masks the stiffness and torsional rigidity that keep the ski from deflecting in dicey conditions. With a 16.4m radius, the Kore feels much narrower underfoot than it is. I could see this ski as a viable backcountry ride. Head has a winner in the new Kore series.
    • Who is it for? Mountain explorers.
    • Who is it not for? The groomer-only crowd.
    • Insider tip: Don't let the weight fool you, this ski can be pushed.

    FairToMiddlin (from last year): The Kore series is the replacement for the Flight series, Head’s lightweight off-piste/touring ski. I admit, for riding the chair up the hill, I don’t get too excited about the manufacturers that are all wound up about adding lightness, and the Kore had me less than stoked, but I heard whispers of "whole ‘nother animal," and gave it a try.

    Wow.

    I got off the Kore 93 and scurried over to the Nordica tent to snatch a pair of 185 Enforcer 93s for a run or two, just to make sure I wasn’t out of my mind.

    Nope, mind intact (well, mostly…). I am a fan of the Enforcer 93/100, have been since it was introduced, but for the things I would want out of a mid-90s ski, I would take the Kore.

    Heresy! Nevertheless, Head has seemingly done what nobody else is truly nailing: a lighter ski that doesn’t sacrifice feel and communication. Its off-piste performance is fun and confident; back on the trail, it has a turn initiation and sidecut shape worthy of the Head name*. The Kore gets the Most Pleasant Surprise of the Year medal, no contest. I would have liked to try the Kore 105, but we didn’t have the soft snow for it. I sure do hope to get on it in the future, however.

    *Weirdly, the really cool looking black topsheet offers no dimensions, and the reps awkwardly admitted they didn’t know the actual sidecut/dims. I’d put it in the realm of 16-18 m.
    • Who is it for? Lightweight schmightweight: it’s for folks looking for a wide 88, or narrow 98, and want solid performance, period.
    • Who is it not for? True 11/10th heavyweights. It is impressive, but it has to start obeying physics at some point, and that probably starts somewhere north of a 200-lb skier.
    • Insider tip: The 180 didn’t ski short; don’t feel like you need to size up as a default.

    Philpug (from last year): Nailed it. Head’s new Kore 93 is such a fun ski. Its lightweight construction and playful nature will make a lot of skiers very happy. There is a crispness here that is not found in many others skis in this class.
    • Who is it for? You like puppies.
    • Who is it not for? Chargers, bigger skiers.
    • Insider tip: Mount 1 cm back.

    Ron (from last year): The new Kore line comprises Head's lighter, more off-piste, touring-friendly skis. I tested it with @Philpug while he was on the Monster 88, which is probably the ski a lot of people will ask about when comparing the two. The Kore does in fact have a lighter, more "fun" feel even while staying well connected to the snow. Despite its prowess in softer snow, the tip engaged well and held an edge on the groomed just fine, and you can still finish a turn. Compared to the Monster 88, it feels less serious -- but that’s not a bad thing. The Kore 93 is a fun, capable, off-piste-oriented ski. It would make a fine AT setup and is a great option for lighter skiers, too.
    • Who is it for? Softer-snow environments; would make a good narrower all-mountain AT ski.
    • Who is it not for? Anyone who is skiing hard groomers 70% of the time.
    • Insider tip: Demo the 88 and the 93 back to back.

    SBrown (from last year): Light and maneuverable yet good, smooth grip on soft groomers. I thought the tip was too soft in steep cruddy bumps, but that’s probably not its strong suit. Should be a popular ski. I worry a little about its lightness in heavy snow but didn’t get to test that.
    • Who is it for? Could easily be a one-ski quiver for in and out of bounds in Colorado.
    • Who is it not for? I’m gonna say big strong skiers in big strong snow, but that is just a guess.
    • Insider tip: Coolest graphics ever.

    UGASkiDawg (from last year): The Kore 93 was great fun in a short section of chopped-up crud in Sail Away Glades. It’s light, and the tail was done perfectly: it’s there if you need it to push you into that next turn but doesn’t demand that you do so. I found the front end of the ski very vague, though; I couldn’t figure out how to get any flex out of it. I could push on it but when I did it felt like I just hit a stop. The ski responded by turning but it was disconcerting. I’d like to give this ski a try again.
    • Who is it for? A Head fan looking for an all-mountain ski that is more off-piste-oriented than the Monster.
    • Who is it not for? Like every Head I’ve been on, this is not for the aspiring intermediate; you need to drive it.
    • Insider tip: Try it back to back with the Monster and/or the Enforcer 93 before making up your mind.

    19 Kore 99 TC.png
    Head Kore 99
    Dimensions: 134-99-120
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 162, 171, 180, 189
    Size tested: 180, 189
    Design: All New

    Drahtguy Kevin: A new addition to the Kore family this year, the 99 has a nice wide shovel that keeps it on top of the chop and a stiffer feel that brings the power and stability needed in variable conditions. But this isn’t just a soft-snow whip: the grip on groomers and firm snow is remarkable. Arcing turns on the Kore is not a bore. Plenty of quickness and energy make for a stellar ride.
    • Who is it for? All-mountain skiers will find harmony in the versatility of the Kore 99.
    • Who is it not for? Traditionalists. This ski is different in a good way.
    • Insider tip: Don’t be afraid to size up. This is an easy-going ski that is lightweight.

    Philpug: Head has put together four solid ski collections (note the yellow/green/red/blue theme). Missing from the Kore up to this point was that fourth ski (the red one), so Head filled the gap between the 93 and 105 with the all-new Kore 99.

    Head accomplished what I think it sought out to do, which was to create a ski that has the ease of the 93 yet the float of the 105, a task that sounds simple but is not always easy. There is a softer-snow bias with the new 99, and that is fine; it is easy like the 93, and that is fine, too. The 99 would be a great one-ski quiver for the West or a wider half of a two-ski quiver for the East. Either way, it is a great option in the 98-100mm category.
    • Who is it for? See above: a relaxed 99 for someone looking for versatility.
    • Who is it not for? Those who like a heavy, damp ski.
    • Insider tip: Head scales its sizes so that all skiers will get the same experience. Shop owners, you have the toughest choice. Chances are, you are not going to stock the 93, 99, and 105, so which two? All I will say…choose wisely.
    dean_spirito: Head decided to expand the Kore lineup for 2019 by adding a 99mm option. Although it feels very similar to the Kore 93 while skiing on piste, the additional width of the Kore 99 makes it a lot friendlier when venturing into deeper snow. I was pleasantly surprised by how smooth this ski was, regardless of where I took it. It initiates turns easily and holds an incredible edge while carving, despite its relatively wide shape. With 3 mm of camber underfoot and stiff construction, the Kore 99 is comfortable at any speed. Definitely one of the highlights of the show!
    • Who is it for? Advanced to expert skiers looking for a stiff all-mountain ski with a distinct Head feel.
    • Who is it not for? Intermediates and those looking for a jibby all-mountain ski; the Kore 99 is stiff and demanding.
    • Insider tip: This ski could go head to head (no pun intended) with the Kastle MX99. I found them to have a very similar feel.

    19 Kore 105 TC.png
    Head Kore 105
    Dimensions: 135-105-125
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 171, 180, 189
    Size tested: 180
    Design: Carryover/NGT

    Philpug (from last year): The Head Flight collection was not the most inspiring that Head ever offered, but it has been replaced by a black Kore collection that is simply amazing. And it's not just in comparison to the low-ish bar set by that outgoing series: these skis are really really good. The Kore 105, as the middle of the three-ski line, does not suffer from middle-child syndrome at all. It handled the mank of Snowbasin with authoritative ease, which says a lot; some skis just folded under the pressure of the high-water-content snow. I hope to see a pair of these in a long-term test down the road.
    • Who is it for? Those who like a light-feeling ski, these are very deceptive.
    • Who is it not for? If you are hard on skis, beware: with the lack of a finished topskin, these might not take abuse.
    • Insider tip: Don't wait, they will sell out early.

    Women

    19 Total Joy TC.png
    Head Super Joy
    Dimensions: 128-75-108
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 143, 148, 153, 158, 163, 168
    Size tested: 168
    Design: Carryover

    Tricia (from last year): When Head introduced the Joy line a few years ago, the promise of making a ski that was both lightweight and powerful with Graphene was something new in its skis. While the technology has since been implemented in its men's skis, the Joy line, and the Super Joy in particular, still stands out. It turns intuitively and pushes through crud effortlessly. When it's time to carry it back to the car, you throw it over your shoulder and realize that you just spent the whole day on a ski this lightweight like it was a powerful carver -- which it is!
    • Who is it for? Anyone desiring a lightweight ski with carving chops.
    • Who is it not for? Someone who likes a damp frontside ski.
    • Insider tip: Don’t let the weight fool you.

    19 Wild Joy TC.png
    Head Wild Joy
    Dimensions: 139-90-119
    Radius: [email protected]
    Sizes: 153, 158, 163, 168, 173
    Size tested: 168
    Design: All New

    Tricia (from last year): The Wild Joy is a ski that was missing from Head's lineup: it had the 75mm Super Joy, which you all know I love, and then the 98mm Great Joy, which has been a fan favorite. I got on this ski twice. The first time was at Copper Mountain on hard-packed groomers, and it did exactly what I expected it to do on the hard pack. It turned nicely and held an edge with confidence. The second time was at Snowbasin, at the end of the day, with a lot of bumpy, choppy, yucky snow. The Wild Joy didn’t disappoint. As light as it feels, it didn’t act light when it was time to power through the choppy yucky snow. Head has a winner with this one.
    • Who is it for? Someone looking for a midfat everyday ski that will turn nicely.
    • Who is it not for? Someone who is timid.
    • Insider tip: Don’t think about the weight; this ski is light but powerful.
     
    hrstrat57, DanoT and Mendieta like this.
  2. Davec1

    Davec1 At the base lodge Skier

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2018
    Posts:
    5
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Tricia, I am looking for a new ski for my wife and was considering the Super Joy or Monster 83 and am keen to hear your thoughts.

    It will be used for mostly on piste resort skiing here in Australia. The weather here is highly variable similar to East Coast spring skiing, so we get a lot of days that start with ice then warm up and turn slush as the day progresses. Off piste is usually crud. So sometimes a bit of extra width and float can help. She is just getting back to skiing after several years off. She's a confident intermediate that will get back to advanced comfortably with a few more weeks under her feet.

    Which of these would you see as better suited and are there any other ski's that you consider suitable?

    Many thanks.
     
    no edge and Philpug like this.
  3. no edge

    no edge Booting up Skier

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Posts:
    71
    The highest performing ski sounds like the Titan. I see no mention of metal? Do any have metal and how heavy duty? The Supershape sound like quiet a lineup. At 190# 5'10" It would be nice to ski the 170 but I would think I could over power them. Any thoughts would be helpful.
     
  4. markojp

    markojp mtn rep for the gear on my feet Industry Insider Instructor

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,743
    Location:
    PNW aka SEA
    Titan has two sheets of titanal. At 5'10" 190, it's really your choice between the 170 and 177. If you like more high speed smedium to long radius turns, the 177 will be fine. You can scooch the binding +1 or 1.5 if you think they feel a bit long. If you're all about short to medium and ski mostly on piste, then the 170 should be fine. Don't overlook the new Monster 83 and 88. They're both excellent skis and would be worth your while if you spend time everywhere on the mountain in all pitches and terrain types.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
    firebanex likes this.
  5. firebanex

    firebanex Getting off the lift Skier

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2018
    Posts:
    204
    Location:
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    I'm 6' and 220# and I have a pair of 177 Titans, They work fantastic and I've never felt like I have come anywhere close to overpowering the ski. The more energy I put into them the more that they want to get around the turns and start another turn. I do sometimes wish I had bought the 170 just for a slightly shorter turn radius but otherwise I have been seriously impressed with this ski. Yes they have metal, lots of metal, the Titans are not a lightweight ski and I love them for it.
     
    Philpug likes this.


  6. Jilly

    Jilly Lead Cougar Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,657
    Location:
    Belleville, Ontario,/ Mont Tremblant, Quebec
    Tricia - did you get to see the Epic Joy? Last year it was only available in Canada and not in US. Wondered if it got there this year.
     
  7. no edge

    no edge Booting up Skier

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Posts:
    71
    Thanks for the reply, bfbnx and mark. I want metal. But I also want supple. Shorter turns is where it's at for me. I ski the FX94 in a 177. It's a great ski but it needs some titanium. Maybe 170 would be a good choice in the titan.

    Jiminy Peak is where I ski the most. The hill is ultra groomed everyday... no irregularities allowed. Shorter skis make the mountain bigger.

    Two layers, that's a lot. But the other choices offer no metal.
     
  8. markojp

    markojp mtn rep for the gear on my feet Industry Insider Instructor

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,743
    Location:
    PNW aka SEA
    Depending on the boot you're in and if it's all groomers all the time, you might consider a SL ski. Nothing makes a small hill (or well groomed hill) much more fun if you're in it for the turns.
     
    Tony S and silverback like this.
  9. no edge

    no edge Booting up Skier

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Posts:
    71
    Your comments are helpful. I have been thinking about SL skis. I don't want a recreational pair and the full-on slalom could be limiting. I spend a lot of time at Jiminy but also ski Vermont.

    My lifetime best skiing was done on a pair of 170 Top Fuel - Nordica. Almost too much metal but they were a fantastic ski for me with my high edge angle skiing. I want a little more finesse without giving up the metal. The Titan sounds like a substantial ski but Head knows how to build a high performance ski without overdoing it. My choice would be 170.

    Boots are Salomon Course, softened for forward flex.

    Having said that, is the Titan a choice... a possibility for me?
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2018
  10. Wendy

    Wendy Trying not to face plant Skier

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2016
    Posts:
    771
    Location:
    PA
    Why go that wide (Titan)if you are thinking about SL skis? Why not the iSpeed or iMagnum?

    I ski the Elan SLX and it is a nice combination of speed and stability plus user friendly fun.
     
  11. no edge

    no edge Booting up Skier

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Posts:
    71
    Good point I passed right over the Magnum and that is a time tested ski from Head. I skied it in a demo from Whiteroom years ago at Stowe and I loved them. It was supple!

    First I will look a little closer. But I am also looking at a ski that is a little wider for skiing VT. I fear getting physically crushed by the Titan. I can see taking four runs, cranking hard turns and then needing a nap.

    Will also look at the Elan. I skied with a guy last year that I met on the hill. He was on the SLX... incredible.

    Thanks, Wendy
     
    Wendy likes this.
  12. Daves not here

    Daves not here Getting on the lift Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    247
    Location:
    Coeur d Alene, Idaho
    I am looking to replace my Head Rev 85 Pro this season. Thinking the 83 Monster would be a good fit with my Bonafide. I demo’d the 88 last season but not the 83. Question - do they ski similar?
     
  13. markojp

    markojp mtn rep for the gear on my feet Industry Insider Instructor

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,743
    Location:
    PNW aka SEA
    Just narrower.... there are two 83's... one with metal and one without... I think it's called the 83x... stick with the metal. Always.
     
    Superbman likes this.
  14. Philpug

    Philpug Enjoying being back on two skis. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2015
    Posts:
    18,297
    Location:
    Reno, eNVy
    Not "always", but in many cases yes...including this one.
     
  15. markojp

    markojp mtn rep for the gear on my feet Industry Insider Instructor

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,743
    Location:
    PNW aka SEA
    To clarify, I meant specifically the monster 83.
     
    Philpug likes this.
  16. no edge

    no edge Booting up Skier

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Posts:
    71
    I bought the I Titan in a 170. Got here in two days... how long for the snow?
     
    Tony S and markojp like this.
  17. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    1,617
    Location:
    Reno
    I don't think Brown delivers that.
     
  18. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,554
    Location:
    NYC
    USPS got that one. :D

    Fed Ex vs UPS.jpg
     
    jimmy and DanoT like this.
  19. DanoT

    DanoT RVer-Skier Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    1,589
    Location:
    Sun Peaks B.C. in winter, Victoria B.C. in summer
    I have a pair of Kore 93 on order and it will be the first non metal ski that I have owned in decades. It has graphene which is lighter and stronger than metal. Kore 93 is damp and stiff and has the feel of a metal ski. So never say, "Always".

    @Philpug, in your Insider Tip for the Kore 93 you recommended mounting the bindings 1 cm back. I was wondering what are your reasons for this suggestion?
     
  20. Scotty I.

    Scotty I. Born with two sheets of metal Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2016
    Posts:
    179
    Location:
    Evergreen, Colorado
    I really wish that Head had kept the Monster 98 in the line with changes similar to those they made to the 83 and the 88. Would have been perfect for those of us who enjoy a heavier, damper ski with a touch of forgiveness.
     

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