Forward Pressure Adjustment on 1970's Rotomat's

morevert

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Hi,
this version doesn't have any forward pressure reference marks on the Heel, that I can see.
The Marker Toe used has the two ridges where it interfaces with the Boot Sole. I can't remember if you need to put "Notches" in the Boot Sole Toe or they just created themselves with use. Looks like I will be hiking to finally try these skis this season
Does anyone have advice?
 

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Sethmasia

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The boots need to be notched with a file. But you're crazy to ski with this toe. It has no elasticity -' either in or out. Marker called "punctual release." To adjust forward pressure flip up the cover that the boot heel rests on. Then move the cable fore and aft. You'll know it's sort of correct when you can get the release index on the ends of the spring adjusters approximately in the middle of their tiny scribed indexes. This was one of the dumbest binding designs ever mass produced.
 

Uncle-A

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You are supposed to notch the toe in order to center the boot sole. The older plastic boots sometimes had line that looked like a seem and that had to be in between the notches. As far as the heel I can not be any help because I have not worked on that type of heel since the 70's and the shop I worked was not a Marker dealer.
 

Doug Briggs

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I agree with Seth about the bindings, however I also do use old bindings on occasion. Mostly Look N17 and Nevada toes. I calibrate and test them as I work in a shop. The binding you have, though, will never be seen on my feet. They are a bear to set up and were never a reliable system, primarily due to toe piece having no elasticity.

Gross adjustments to length/forward pressure are done by lifting the plate on the ski and moving the cable in the slots. Forward pressure micro adjustment is done by screwing the springs in or out on the cable. There are indicators on the binding to show proper pressure. On this binding, the amount of forward pressure was calibrated to the release setting you were using.

Setting these bindings up was difficult at best in the day and not worth trying today.
 

Wolfski

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But they were great at preventing a pre-release, sorry any consistent release. Release at the toe? Don't remember one. Release at the heel? I remember one explosion with my explodamats, had a hell of a time getting it back together as I was young but I know there's a lot of fond memories of "The Pinch"
At least the Rotomats released, what about those Telemats lol.
 

Bill Talbot

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The boots need to be notched with a file. But you're crazy to ski with this toe. It has no elasticity -' either in or out. Marker called "punctual release." To adjust forward pressure flip up the cover that the boot heel rests on. Then move the cable fore and aft. You'll know it's sort of correct when you can get the release index on the ends of the spring adjusters approximately in the middle of their tiny scribed indexes. This was one of the dumbest binding designs ever mass produced.
Seth is of course correct. If you really want to ski the Rotomat heel do yourself a BIG favor and find a pair of Marker M-4 toe pieces. These are light years better than the Simplex toe, have some actual anti-shock travel, require no boot notches and best of all mount on the very same holes as the Simplex toe! No change at all required.

I skied this combo for a couple years in the 70's. Then switched to LOOK and never looked back!

Marker M4 Toe pieces.jpg
 

Bill Talbot

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But they were great at preventing a pre-release, sorry any consistent release. Release at the toe? Don't remember one. Release at the heel? I remember one explosion with my explodamats, had a hell of a time getting it back together as I was young but I know there's a lot of fond memories of "The Pinch"
At least the Rotomats released, what about those Telemats lol.
Ah the Marker Telemat. They did 'release' in theory. It was all based on leverage ratio.
I would not opt to ski a pair however! It's 1967 again!

Marker Telemat 1967.jpg


Marker Telmat info 4.jpg
 

markojp

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As always, an amazing repository of antiquated gear knowledge! Very cool!

( I almost typed 'suppository'. :) )
 

Bill Talbot

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The boots need to be notched with a file. But you're crazy to ski with this toe. It has no elasticity -' either in or out. Marker called "punctual release." To adjust forward pressure flip up the cover that the boot heel rests on. Then move the cable fore and aft. You'll know it's sort of correct when you can get the release index on the ends of the spring adjusters approximately in the middle of their tiny scribed indexes. This was one of the dumbest binding designs ever mass produced.

Seth, speaking of the Simplex DL toe (and Rotomat heel), I still vividly recall a full 'Competition' prep of this binding system in SKIING magazine in the later 70's.

First they placed a proper AFD under the ball of the foot. This of course raised the toe piece a substantial amount. The toe piece height adjustment is made by removing the small screw pin in the front and rotating the toe up or down to get the correct height, then replacing the pin. If unscrewed (raised) much the leverage would cause flex. So the would place a plastic shim under the base to get the elevation needed without the flex.
Then they would shape the outer wings of the toe piece where they would touch the shell of the boot when there was movement. By opening up this clearance a small amount to re centering was perhaps possible. This is a double pivot toe so this slightly changed the time it took for the ball to pop and open the toe piece.

In back, the Rotomat was set up with the BLACK springs (then available from LOOK) and
the heel was mounted to keep the angle as steep as possible. This would maximize heel
hold down creating a solid ski/boot interface and also lesson the forward pressure to the toe piece which helped with minor re centering.

Also in play in those days was the mix and match of different brand heels and toes. Very popular were the Rotomat FD (turntable base) with the LOOK Nevada toe. I also remember seeing some with the Salomon 502 toes. Until LOOK came out with the RED Comp Grand Prix heels with the heavier spring many couldn't stay in them for racing. Washers were even used to add spring preload to try to stop popping out leaving the start house!

Marker Simplex DL 02.JPG


Marker Rotamat FD 1.jpg


Look N17 NIB.jpg
 

Doug Briggs

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Seth is of course correct. If you really want to ski the Rotomat heel do yourself a BIG favor and find a pair of Marker M-4 toe pieces. These are light years better than the Simplex toe, have some actual anti-shock travel, require no boot notches and best of all mount on the very same holes as the Simplex toe! No change at all required.

I skied this combo for a couple years in the 70's. Then switched to LOOK and never looked back!

View attachment 97332
I didn't know that about the whole pattern. Thanks
 

Wolfski

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[Q Until LOOK came out with the RED Comp Grand Prix heels with the heavier spring many couldn't stay in them for racing. Washers were even used to add spring preload to try to stop popping out leaving the start house!

View attachment 97344

View attachment 97345

View attachment 97346
[/QUOTE]
Loved the Red Grand Prix set up but we didn't use washers to preload, we used pipe. No more pre-release, lol
 

Bad Bob

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Anybody else remember using the original Simplex toe pieces? No ball bearing, no double release. It released with a metal clip in the front of the toe piece. Bend it toward the boot, it was tighter. bend it toward the tip it was looser. Loose the screw that held the clip, you were screwed (lost one in deep snow in the bowl at Alyeska that was a tough walk out)!
 

Doug Briggs

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Anybody else remember using the original Simplex toe pieces? No ball bearing, no double release. It released with a metal clip in the front of the toe piece. Bend it toward the boot, it was tighter. bend it toward the tip it was looser. Loose the screw that held the clip, you were screwed (lost one in deep snow in the bowl at Alyeska that was a tough walk out)!
I remember seeing them and thinking What the Heck! I never skied a Simplex of any ilk.
 

Royal

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I have skied a simplex toe in the last couple of years; with leather boots too. I had no issues. they released when needed and held when they should. the skis were quite fun too. the scariest toes pieces I've ever used were millers with forward throw cables for the heels.
IMAG0439.jpg
 
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