Zeiss Lens Technology

AmyPJ

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Another nod to the Prizm. One of my requirements was to be as single lense as possible simply acknowledging permanent drawer space for second lenses, and especially to not get caught up in Anon's game of selling different lenses based on frame color. The M2 is going to be a three lense goggle for a lot of people, and that's three bills on the budget. But at least they have earth magnets :golfclap:.

Anyway, I have fairly sensitive eyes to bright light (always in sunglasses) and I use the Flight Deck rose prizm in all light conditions. It is definitely an excellent low light and broad spectrum contrast lense, and I haven't felt a need to "darken" more. To the extent that's a personal thing, I think providing excellent terrain contrast over a decent spectrum is more important than "low" or "high" light. We don't ski light, we ski terrain contrast (or lack thereof) and I'm not sure that correlates most directly to either optical quality or extra lenses.
This has been my exact experience with the prizm rose. If I know it's going to be sunshine all day, I swap them for the prizm jade, but my eyes are not at all bothered in sunshine by the rose.
 

Monique

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We don't ski light, we ski terrain contrast (or lack thereof)
This really stood out to me. If I can't see the shape of the snow, I'm going to have a rough time.
 

Monique

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How often do you ski runs you're well familiar with and do you visualise them before and as you start?
I don't have the bump shapes memorized.
 

Monique

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A concise and to the point answer *grin* - so it's an issue of _short_-range mismatch between expectation/mental model and external inputs?
Yes. That and my inability to just take bumps as they come. I definitely stare at the tips of my skis too much. So, given that bumps are not my strong suit, being unable to see contour is a real problem. There are several runs I feel fine on till about 3pm midwinter - then the sun is setting and I lose most of my confidence. Actually it's not just on bumps, but on any non groomer terrain.
 

UGASkiDawg

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I demoed goggles at the SIA on snow demo. Mostly low light and flat light conditions. I did not like the Oakley Prizms at all in flat light. The Smith blue sensor was good but the Zeal Sky Blue mirror was head and shoulders above the rest for these old eyes. I'll be getting a pair.
 

Ron

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I demoed goggles at the SIA on snow demo. Mostly low light and flat light conditions. I did not like the Oakley Prizms at all in flat light. The Smith blue sensor was good but the Zeal Sky Blue mirror was head and shoulders above the rest for these old eyes. I'll be getting a pair.
Great to finally meet you! I appreciate the input on these. There was a conversation about those lens and we discussed your impressions. I would like to try a pair. I should have grabbed a demo pair. Have you used the Anon M blue lagoon? It replaced my much loved smith blue sensors. I find that for a low light lens, what is most important is simply being able to discern depth. As. Base point, I had no issues with light with the blue lagoon on Monday (except when it was nuking so hard you couldn't see anything ). I have learned to trust my feet more and not rely so much on vision.
 

UGASkiDawg

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Great to finally meet you! I appreciate the input on these. There was a conversation about those lens and we discussed your impressions. I would like to try a pair. I should have grabbed a demo pair. Have you used the Anon M blue lagoon? It replaced my much loved smith blue sensors. I find that for a low light lens, what is most important is simply being able to discern depth. As. Base point, I had no issues with light with the blue lagoon on Monday (except when it was nuking so hard you couldn't see anything ). I have learned to trust my feet more and not rely so much on vision.
I have not tried the Anon. I know @Philpug had the Zeal Sky Blue's on yesterday afternoon so maybe he has some experience with both that and the Anon.
 

Nobody

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This really stood out to me. If I can't see the shape of the snow, I'm going to have a rough time.
How often do you ski runs you're well familiar with and do you visualise them before and as you start?
A trick I learnt as a kid is to let the ski shovels be my "eyes" in low/poor/no visibility situations. As goggles...ssince a couple of years I am using POC goggles and find them very good even if their cpating is "delicate" and scratches very easily...previously used Oakley an thought well of them as well. For sunny warm spring days, and while resting at huts, an old iridium like lenses sunglasses from Bolle' are still my favourite choiche. The lens is as big and covers the upper face as well as goggles, but face skin can "breath air"...if I'll ever be able to get the expense approved by the family CFO, they might finally find a replacement in the Oakley Jawbreakers...me like those very much.
 

James

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I demoed goggles at the SIA on snow demo. Mostly low light and flat light conditions. I did not like the Oakley Prizms at all in flat light. The Smith blue sensor was good but the Zeal Sky Blue mirror was head and shoulders above the rest for these old eyes. I'll be getting a pair.
The Sky Blue Mirror is listed at 80% VLT.
The Oakley Prizm Rose- around 25%
No light in eyes, no contrast. There's only so much you can do with limited photons into the retina. No matter how much bs Oakley puts out you need light in your eyes.
This is essentially a clear lens with a mirror flash on it to cut glare.
---------------------------
ABOUT SKY BLUE MIRROR

Optimum Clear + Bluebird mirror provides the highest level of light transmission in our goggle line, allowing for safe riding in the worst visibility. This lens is perfect when you need every possible ray of light on those really nasty days and the blue flash mirror helps to keep your eyes comfortable by cutting low level glare off the snow.

 

Lorenzzo

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I demoed goggles at the SIA on snow demo. Mostly low light and flat light conditions. I did not like the Oakley Prizms at all in flat light. The Smith blue sensor was good but the Zeal Sky Blue mirror was head and shoulders above the rest for these old eyes. I'll be getting a pair.
I'm down for the Zeals. Thanks for your thoughts.
 

Uncle-A

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When these were made Bausch & Lomb made the Ray-Ban sun glasses using the same technology.


 

jwaltz

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In my opinion, I think the Oakley Prizm Lenses are fantastic in all conditions, especially in flat light. I own the Prizm Torch Iridium lens, Prizm Sapphire lens, and Prizm Rose lens. My go-to is the Torch iridium lens because they are on the lower end of the light spectrum, so they aren't as good as the Prizm Sapphire on bright days, but they will still do the job effectively (which is keeping my eyes from being blinded by the reflection of the snow). The Torch is also great for low light powder days and I actually prefer the over the Rose lens.Overall, I think Oakley did a great job with the Prizm contrast lens series, and I have no reason to believe that the Zeiss tech is much better because of how satisfied I've been with my Oakleys.
 
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Tricia

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I demoed goggles at the SIA on snow demo. Mostly low light and flat light conditions. I did not like the Oakley Prizms at all in flat light. The Smith blue sensor was good but the Zeal Sky Blue mirror was head and shoulders above the rest for these old eyes. I'll be getting a pair.
I have not tried the Anon. I know @Philpug had the Zeal Sky Blue's on yesterday afternoon so maybe he has some experience with both that and the Anon.
I'm not sure if @Philpug has had the anon in flat light. I know he liked the zeal a lot
 

Tom K.

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Recommendos for a Zeal goggle model for a big-ish guy that likes a wider field of vision?

Smith Vantage helmet.

Thanks!
 

DoryBreaux

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Anything with a blue Z on it should outperform it's competition by a large margin. In cinema lenses (and to an extent, stills lenses) this is the case. There us a reason Zeiss can ask over 90k for a zoom lens. To my eyes, the google lenses touting the Zeiss name do not perform significantly better (I'm not talking about price exclusively). I love my IOX, and i love my Atomics witch Ziess lenses. Do I like one over the other? Well, I haven't used the Atomics since Christmas...
 
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