Erik Timmerman

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A lot of these drills sound like skiing to me. Just going off of the OP's question, I'm picturing stuff you can do on the flats or green trails that let you know you can just go for it.

So I'm thinking - skating, whirly birds, javelins
 
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A lot of these drills sound like skiing to me. Just going off of the OP's question, I'm picturing stuff you can do on the flats or green trails that let you know you can just go for it.

So I'm thinking - skating, whirly birds, javelins
Yes, I was trying to identify the 3 best individual drills - even though each drill is really a compilation of specific things. The idea is that an experienced observer could still look at the drill being done and say "yeah, they did that correctly". Maybe it takes more than 3 drills to cover everything an advanced / expert skier should be proficient at.
 

slowrider

Making fresh tracks
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5. Short radius turns down a steep icy groomer. Brushed or carved turns?
 

oldschoolskier

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In a serious reply to see ability, any set of drills that shows balance and edge control first and foremost.

360 spins (and variations there of). The reason is simple, the better they are here the easier it is to teach any other skill because it is just teaching the skill and not the balance that goes with it.

IMHO most skiers can learn skills, however balance and edge feel is trained and practiced by few, which leads into the “ice just proves it” comment.

Aside from decent edges, poor balance and edge feel issues are quickly highlighted on ice regardless how good skills may appear.
 

Pasha

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360 spins just started to happen for me without me knowing how they happen. I mean, I practiced a bunch semi-successfully last season per youtube and other instruction but without a lot of success or confidence. This season, they just kind of happen at ease... most of the time... does it mean my balance now is due to muscle memory rather than effort?
 

KevinF

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A lot of these drills sound like skiing to me. Just going off of the OP's question, I'm picturing stuff you can do on the flats or green trails that let you know you can just go for it.

So I'm thinking - skating, whirly birds, javelins
What is a whirly bird? Flat spin 360?
 

LiquidFeet

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A lot of these drills sound like skiing to me. Just going off of the OP's question, I'm picturing stuff you can do on the flats or green trails that let you know you can just go for it.

So I'm thinking - skating, whirly birds, javelins
If we are sticking to maneuvers on the bunny slope or very low pitch green trails, then flat 360º spins definitely should be on the list. They require finely tuned fore-aft balance, edge control, total body control on a minute scale, outside ski to outside ski transfer, and sensitive proprioception of the ski-snow interaction.

Here's a list of bunny slope options mentioned so far in this thread. I may have missed a few.
It should be noted that all of these are harder to perform at very slow speeds without the help of momentum, so actually doing them on the bunny slope makes them more revealing of skill level and versatility.

--skating
--railroad tracks
--outside ski turns (carved)
--pivot slips
--flat 360ºs
--ultra slow parallel (thanks @Bad Bob for that one)
 
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I took the day off to rest my feet and recharge my ambitions, today will be a morning drill day with this thread in mind. Thanks everybody!

There was some mention but not a lot of support for dolphin turns to help one manage the humps and bumps of moguls and tree skiing. Are there other drills that focus on those skills? That would be a key element in my progress I believe, that and just working my way slowly into appropriate terrain.
 

KevinF

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I'm no Easterner, but I'll quote @Bob Barnes: "There is no such thing as bad snow. There's good snow, and snow that is good for you..."
Easterners may have a lock on "ice", but I've encountered some pretty atrocious "snow" in all parts of the country. I was skiing with Bob once in Copper in the springtime. He dropped into some bumps and I immediately heard the "coral reef" sound. I had a :eek: expression; to my relief even Bob pulled to a stop after two turns. I figured that even HE was going to side-step out of this mess.

Instead Bob looks back at me and exclaims "THIS IS GONNA BE SO UNBELIEVABLY GOOD FOR YOU!" and skied down. :nono: Yes, I followed with substantially poorer form that he exhibited.

I'd agree with Bob's statement, but add this: "the snow that is good for you is not really good fun".
I have to agree, but the "good for you" conditions do tend to lead to good stories though.
 

mdf

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"coral reef" sound. I had a :eek: expression; to my relief even Bob pulled to a stop after two turns. I figured that even HE was going to side-step out of this mess.

Instead Bob looks back at me and exclaims "THIS IS GONNA BE SO UNBELIEVABLY GOOD FOR YOU!" and skied down. :nono:
A couple years ago the Ministry had a lot of fun in the coral reef field where you swing wide to skier's left as you enter Zuma at A-Basin. "Think it's softened up yet?" "Dunno, let's go see." "Nope, still horrible."
Loose knees help suck up the chatter. Extra wide arms with the poles held wide add stability (that practicing-for-level-3 look).
 

Kneale Brownson

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We have a bit of list inflation going on here but I like the answers. The white pass turn is the only one I don't have in my toolbox. I've heard all the explanations as to why I should learn them but I still don't have an intuitive grasp as to why they are so important to a sport that focuses on the big toe edge of the outside ski. Maybe if I spent a week mastering them I would come to a better understanding.
Do you know what tracer turns are? They're turns in each direction on the same ski with the other one just touching the snow throughout. They'll get you on your way to doing WP turns.
 
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