Where should I mount my Rustler 11 188s?

Discussion in 'Hardgoods: Skis, Bindings, Poles, and More' started by ToyBox, Feb 19, 2019.

  1. ToyBox

    ToyBox Booting up Skier

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    Rustler 11 188s just came in the mail.

    I have the cochise 185 and the recommended mount on these R11s is significantly forward of that.

    I am trying to decide between -1 and at the line. Have narrowed it down to these 2 choices.

    I have seen a few internet posters who went -1 and thought is was good.

    Anyone mount at the line and subsequently wished they had mounted back?

    I want to get it right the first time if possible, have several sets of skis with an extra set of holes cause I wasnt happy with my first mount[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
  2. Eleeski

    Eleeski Out on the slopes Skier

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    Schizio or demo bindings for sure. Moving the bindings around is always part of dialing in a new ski (or length).

    I always like the forward mount - unless I don't.

    Eric
     
  3. Doug Briggs

    Doug Briggs Skiing the powder Industry Insider Pugski Ski Tester

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    I am of the POV that most skis will ski well mounted on the 'recommended' mark. I feel that people's boot alignment, skiing style and general ability to ski dynamically has more to do with how a ski skis than mounting point; within reason, of course. Mount a ski an inch or two the wrong way and it will ski like crap. Move the binding a cm or two fore or aft of recommended and most, in a blind test, wouldn't notice. The problem is that moving a binding is never blind test and the user will 'prefer' a different mounting position because they 'feel' it is what they are looking for.

    On a related note, because you mention it, similar length skis will have different recommended mount points because of their contact points, rocker, camber and other features of the ski. Back in the old days when shapes were nearly identical on all skis, you'd expect mount points to be similar with similar sizes. Not anymore.

    Extra holes in your (modern) skis are not a problem. Today's construction methods and in many cases wider profiles make skis much more durable and able to withstand multiple mounts. Properly plugged, extra will not be apparent when you ski them. They only problem they introduce is the ability to remount bindings but even then, 2, 3 or ever 4 mounts won't be a problem for most skis.
     
  4. GregK

    GregK Getting off the lift Skier

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    Answered in your Teton post but will answer again here.

    The Rustler series(especially the 188 and 192cm models) have a large binding mount sweet spot like the older twin tip Blizzard big mountain series had. Can go more forward a cm or 2 for a more playful, free ride/style ski that skis shorter like all the FWT skiers do or back a cm or so to make them a more traditional feeling ski that is a touch less playful.

    Rec point is a good compromise between playful and stability but honestly not a huge difference on this ski. That’s why you’ll see lots of +1 or +2 and love it, on the line and love it and -1 and love it. You could always split the difference and go -0.5cm back and I guarantee it will ski great.
     
  5. Tom K.

    Tom K. HRPufnStf Skier

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    If you like the style and feel of the (much more traditional) Cochise, and will be switching back and forth frequently, I'd go -1 on the new boards.

    I'm definitely a "traditional" skier, and have been around the block recently with two pair of skis. On both the Enforcer 100s and Ranger 115s, I liked them quite a bit on the line and loved them at -1.5 (respectfully disagreeing with @Doug Briggs blindfold opinion above).

    As others pointed out, remounting a modern ski is not big deal, and for me at least, VASTLY preferable to demo binders. In fact, with a little math and some chatting with your shop guy, you can mount the heel pieces so that only a toe re-mount will be required, assuming you know whether or not you're likely to go forward or back from the original mount point.
     
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  6. Jtlange

    Jtlange Getting on the lift Skier

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    I really liked them on the line. Not much wrong with that ski at all.
     
  7. François Pugh

    François Pugh Out on the slopes Skier

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    In the garage, if it's heated, in the workshop if you have one or on the kitchen table. :D
    In my experience, the folks who put the line on the skis know what they are doing.
     
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  8. Thread Starter
    TS
    ToyBox

    ToyBox Booting up Skier

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    Thought long and hard and ultimately decided to the mount the line instead of back. They are forward of my other skis but are working out fine.

    The people who mark the line are not always correct in my experience though. I have some head monsters that I had to remount at 2+ and prolly could have gone 2.5 or 3+.

    After 4 days tips had a ton of wear from banging together. Skis are just not durable for folks like myself who bang the skis together. Had the shop jank on some tip protectors.

    Overall pretty happy with what I have got.

    Thanks to those who chimed in!
     

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  9. givethepigeye

    givethepigeye Really, just Rob will do Skier

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    Should have read this. I put mine on the line and could not get off them fast enough. I actually went back to the truck to get my SR95’s on an 18” day at the Bird today. But I didn’t like the Enforcers 100 until I moved them back 1.5. Anyway, maybe they aren’t my cup of tea.. Conflicted on drilling them again back or just moving on.
     
  10. GregK

    GregK Getting off the lift Skier

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    Always file and gummy stone the tips of any ski dull to prevent chipping. About an inch or so down from where those metal tip protectors end is perfect. No reason for tips/tails that are always in the air off the snow to be sharp.

    Maybe the skis are trying to tell you to open your stance more? ogwink
     
  11. Ken_R

    Ken_R Living the Dream Skier

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    I demoed the Rustler 11's in 188cm on the line and they felt fantastic. Some skis really require one to experiment but the Rustlers felt great on the line. As usual YMMV. As I learned yesterday, when in doubt, get demo bindings.
     
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  12. GregK

    GregK Getting off the lift Skier

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    What didn’t you like about them?

    With the tunes of the Rustlers being commonly so off, a base grind and hand tune of the edges would be my first step before moving the bindings or giving up on them. The Rustler 11 is kinda like an even more forgiving Enforcer so it’s rare you get the “I can’t stand them” sort of response about them. Something has to be up there.
     
  13. Jtlange

    Jtlange Getting on the lift Skier

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    I found they were really vague until I sharpened the edges of them and once I did that they turned like I wanted them to. Bases were good for sure but Ive hit enough stuff with them already they might need a fresh tune.
     
  14. givethepigeye

    givethepigeye Really, just Rob will do Skier

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    Weird, I thought I would like them. I bought them to be a more versatile than the 118 width, almost 30m radius Bodacious (the tapered tip one w/o metal). Those I got really cheap , thanks STP, and replaced 186 Gunsmokes. Seemed to have traits I would like. More directionall, some tail rocker but not a TT. Metal underfoot.

    Skied them on an 18” overnigh, 30”storm in UT, so it was deep. First thing was the tips seemed really short, I was tentative to push them as I thought the tips would just submarine, they didn’t though. What I did noticed was the shovels got bounced around in deep chopped up snow, the SR’s go right through. I didn’t think they were very damp. They also felt kind of reminiscent of the Gunsmokes I got rid of. Also, if you got bucked, that tail was not really supportive (I guess with the rocker).

    Perhaps they aren’t my cup of tea, really just felt not too dissimilar to the old Gunsmokes to me.

    I moved my Enforcer mount back 1.5 and liked them, so maybe I’ll do that - frankly though, I’ll probably just sell them.

    Anyone looking? Drilled one time Pivots, @ 316

    I think the tune is off too, felt sketchy on the catwalks back to lift. Maybe do that first.
     
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  15. GregK

    GregK Getting off the lift Skier

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    You have the 188cm length? 192cm version is stiffer and damper but they still aren’t going to be as damp as something like an Cochise or something else with full metal. Moment Commander might be up your alley with the mount moved back a touch. They charge for their weight.

    Tune, especially a stone grind to flatten the bases and reset the edges would help stability and edge grip so I’d definitely recommend trying that to see if that’s enough for you to like them more.
     
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  16. givethepigeye

    givethepigeye Really, just Rob will do Skier

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    @GregK they are the 188’s. I’ll probably get them sorted and give it a whirl one more time - thanks.
     
  17. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    I demoed a Rustler 9 that was so badly messed up it was unskiable. Wasn't a hanging burr. I had to go rent another pair of skis because the shop was now over an hour away round trip. The things were dangerous on the wet compressed snow. Weird. I'm sure a good base grind and edge setting would fix it.
     
  18. ski otter 2

    ski otter 2 Out on the slopes Skier

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    (I was happy with mounting the Rustler 11s (180, 188, 192) on the line. Usually I experiment with mount point, using Schizos on fat skis.)

    It's just a fact o' life that often, we are skiing the tune as much as the ski. At SIA, for instance, the Stockli booth was the only one with multiple burred up tunes, some worse than others. (I had only one other poorly tuned ski in two days of demoing, and that one was only a little off, not like at least two or three of the Stocklis.) With a few of the Lasers, it was a good thing I already knew how well they skied and thus did not hold the tune against them. But with a pair of SR 95s and another of SR 88s, at least, the tunes were badly off, and your description of skiing the Rustler 11s reminded me of that. The SR 88s, in particular, were poorly enough burr-tuned or edge-high tuned to be dangerous.

    FWIW, at an earlier demo this year, I skied on a powder/crud day three lengths of the Rustler 11s one after another, all on the line: 180. 188, 192. I can concur that the 192 was noticeably more stable in chop/crud - more like the Bodacious than the Gunsmoke or Peacemaker. But the other two lengths surprised me with how well they did in at least colder snow chop crud, on the line. At the same time, the 188 to me was not as stable, and it lacked the slow-it-down playfullness of the 180s - definitely not as stable as the best powder/crud skis, to me.

    On the other hand, we've had some really heavy, wet snow deep days this past month here in Colo, and that's forced me to re-evaluate powder/crud skis. Some of my go to powder/crud skis worked much better in that unusually deep/heavy stuff when moved back a bit: 3/4 cm to 1 1/4 cm back. And a few of my shorter "go to" powder skis just got overwhelmed a bit on those days. (While some didn't.)

    So, by the way, I definitely disagree with Doug Briggs on this, though often would defer to him practically on principle: the ability to move powder skis forward and back is a big deal, wonderful and obvious at times - not a bit subtle enough to be subject to the placebo effect. And it depends on the ski whether or not, say, moving 1/2 cm forward or back is an an obvious big deal or not. For some fat skis, it is. Others, not so much.

    Also, the amount of "slip" detectable with a demo or Schizo binding in powder, but also elsewhere - now, that, to me, is subtle enough to be either undetectable or placebo effect material for real, even though I understand that at times there have been demo models that are a problem in this way.

     

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