Featured Understanding Traction Control Regulation in the Mountains

Discussion in 'General Skiing' started by Tricia, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    Tahoe updated some requirements to make it safer and easier to understand on certain highways in both California and Nevada.
    The Tahoe Daily Tribune had this good article about understanding the requirements.
    5 things to know about chain control in Tahoe before you go.


    In a post on FB by @SkiNurse regarding the new Colorado DOT requirements for traction control has some people were asking questions about the ratings of tires.
    Does Colorado now require snow tires specifically or are mud&snow tires acceptable?

    Here are some links that should clarify some things.
    https://www.codot.gov/travel/winter-driving/assets/FactSheetTractionandPassengerVehicleChainLaw.pdf

    Fact Sheet —Traction Law and Passenger Vehicle Chain Law

    Traction Law (Code 15) — Use George’s Head to Check Your Tread

    • If weather conditions require, CDOT will implement a Traction Law.
    • Under a Traction Law, motorists will need to have either snow tires, tires with the

      mud/snow (M+S) designation, or a four-wheel/all-wheel drive vehicle — all tires must have a minimum one-eighth inch tread.


      Passenger Vehicle Chain Law (Code 16) — Chain Up or Stay Off
    • During severe winter storms, CDOT will implement a Passenger Vehicle Chain Law

      — this is the final safety measure before the highway is closed.

    • Under a Passenger Vehicle Chain Law, every vehicle on the roadway is required to

      have chains or an alternative traction device (like AutoSock).

      Fines

    • Motorists driving with inadequate equipment during a Traction Law or Passenger Vehicle Chain Law could be fined more than $130.

    • If a motorist blocks the roadway because they have inadequate equipment during a Traction Law or Passenger Vehicle Chain Law, they could be fined more than $650.

      Test Your Tread
    • Find out if your tires are safe for winter driving by doing the Quarter Test:
    o Insert a quarter upside down into your tire tread, with Washington’s head

    going in first.
    o If the top of the head is covered by tread, you’re good to go.
    o If the top of his head is visible at any point around the tire (test multiple

    points), you can’t drive when a Traction Law is called — you also likely need new tires.

    Traffic Facts

    • At 60 MPH on snowy pavement, winter tires require 310 ft. to stop. All-season tires require more than double that (668 ft.).

    • In 2014, one of the worst traffic delays on the I-70 Mountain Corridor was caused by unprepared motorists. Severe delays were caused by 22 vehicles spinning out and causing crashes — 19 of those vehicles had worn tires.

    • Traffic accidents — not volume — account for as much as 60 percent of all traffic delays.

    • A crash that only takes 10 minutes to clear can delay traffic for an hour.

      Statewide Tire Deals
    • To help motorists prepare for winter driving, CDOT has partnered with tire companies across the state to offer discounts on new tires.

    • T o find a tire company with deals near you, visit winter .codot.gov/tires.
     
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  2. slowrider

    slowrider Making fresh tracks Skier

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    Ppl drive 60 on pack snow?
     
  3. 4ster

    4ster Now with more photos! Instructor

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    Yes but only when no one is around ;)
     
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  4. Thread Starter
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    Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    The SS Pugski got new tires this year.
    This is the same tire we had last time, under a new brand. It was a great M&S tire that held up well
    new tires SS Pugski.JPG
     
  5. Ken_R

    Ken_R Living the Dream Skier

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    How do they do in the snow and ice?
     


  6. Thread Starter
    TS
    Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    Really well.
    The previous version was Hankook.
     
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  7. scott43

    scott43 Making fresh tracks Skier

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    I'll do between 100kmh and 120kmh on snowpack, depending on traction level, traffic and road. It's really not that bad provided the conditions are favourable.
     
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  8. Ken_R

    Ken_R Living the Dream Skier

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    On i70, yes, :eek::eek::eek: and faster. :eek::eek::eek: Hence, chains are useless (unless you want to drive behind a semi at 25mph), you really need severe winter rated tires here, and good ones.
     
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  9. EricG

    EricG Waiting for snow! Skier

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    A lot of days I don't even hit 60 in my 26 mile commute to work (when I actually go to the office).
     
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  10. Ogg

    Ogg Out on the slopes Skier

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    With the right tires and vehicle that doesn't seem particularly fast, IME. You do need to get into the "zen" of driving in winer conditions where a little controlled slippage is just part of the game.
     
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  11. scott43

    scott43 Making fresh tracks Skier

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    And provided it's cold and no salt has been used, that snow texture has remarkable traction. Start salting and making slush and all bets are off. Most roads up north outside of built-up areas are just plowed and sanded. No problem.
     
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  12. slowrider

    slowrider Making fresh tracks Skier

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    That's good to know, cause I didn't want to be that guy in the 53 ton truck doing 60 barefoot on snowpack. Like folks said, there's a time and a place for it. Lockers in & a snow load on the drivers.
     
  13. François Pugh

    François Pugh Making fresh tracks Skier

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    I remember way back in the day driving down Highway 401 at 100 mph on glare ice just west of Cornwall Ontario during an ice (freezing rain for several days) storm feeling quite proud of myself and my knowledge of physics, an object moving in a straight line will continue in a straight line....... That is, until I realized that a sudden gust of wind counted as an external force. Thanks to quick reflexes and over-boosted power steering I was able to recover after going flat sideways down the road. Learned my lesson though.
     
  14. 4ster

    4ster Now with more photos! Instructor

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    Yup, there is good driving snow and then there is good FOR your driving snow :snow: :cool:
     
  15. slowrider

    slowrider Making fresh tracks Skier

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    How did your shorts come out of it?
     
  16. François Pugh

    François Pugh Making fresh tracks Skier

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    Shorts were fine. The thought that I might end up injured never entered my mind; I was too busy steering.
     
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  17. Erik Timmerman

    Erik Timmerman Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    Slow people do. In Vermont anyway.
     
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  18. surfsnowgirl

    surfsnowgirl Instructor Skier

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    I take it slow whenever there's snow/ice on the ground. My Wrangler had great traction control as it was in 2wheel drive unless I engaged the 4x4. Most of the time I just kept it in 2 wheel unless there was lots of stuff on the ground because the traction control would snap on lighting fast which was cool. One time I was taking a corner a little too fast on a windy road in the road (my fault) but traction control snapped on and bam, instant solid ground. Crosstrek is awd all the time and a different vehicle so it's a different ride. When I have the snows on it I take it slower anyway because even if the roads are dry I feel the rubberyness of the tires and I prefer to go slower. I remember similar rules when we'd drive to big bear but heading up those mountain passes I get why they did it. Even though Vermont's very hilly it's nothing like out west but it always surprises me how many people have 2wd cars and non snow tires in the winter. Safety first...………..
     
  19. slowrider

    slowrider Making fresh tracks Skier

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    An tips on descending steep, slick grades. Like your friends driveway from hell.
     
  20. sparty

    sparty Getting on the lift Skier

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    If it's truly steep and truly slick, you're probably not going to be able to actually reduce speed at any point, so don't get going faster than you want to be going at the slowest point on the roadway. Ideally, you can accomplish that with engine braking and keep whatever front-wheel traction you have available for steering.
     
    slowrider likes this.

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