Tuck position/silly human trick

Discussion in 'General Skiing' started by Pequenita, Feb 2, 2019.

  1. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    That looks like a hybrid tuck. It's a combo of the toilet bowl and the porcupine tucks.
     
  2. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

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    That guy is in the midst of trolling for alien with his new and improved antenna configuration. Part of the SETI program.
     
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  3. headybrew

    headybrew surrender to the flow Skier

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    I find it way easier to put my hands and poles behind me when in a tucked position, it burns like hell but I can stay tucked the full length of Corona way at WP from Pano lift to Challenger lift. Feels so good to stand up at the end.
     
  4. LouD-Truckee

    LouD-Truckee Getting off the lift Skier

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    Sputnik.....
     
  5. François Pugh

    François Pugh Out on the slopes Skier

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    If it's not too bumpy and your boots have enough forward lean, you can rest your chest on your knees; if it is too bumpy you can get kneed in the chest.
     


  6. mister moose

    mister moose Instigator Skier

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    Killington has a few upwind schleps, the most common being Bittersweet run out under the quad around the lodge to K1. Worse yet is Highlander. With the prevailing westerlies blowing mid 20's and more, being in a tuck will let you just move forward at 12 mph, vs a standstill. On days like this, there's immediate feedback on drag reduction. The difference between torso upright and torso level(ish) is the biggest, hand position feels minor but noticeable. What's really noticeable on hand position is heat loss, at below zero wind chill, hands in back is way warmer.

    For me, the neck stretch to see ahead is the hardest part.
     
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  7. mdf

    mdf entering the Big Couloir Skier

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    The thing is, even a very bad tuck helps some. It is about all I can manage, and I can feel the differnce in resistance on a flat run out and see the difference compared to the other people on the runout.
     
  8. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

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    We can try the various configuration on the return trail next couple of days.
     
  9. geepers

    geepers Getting off the lift Skier

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    The longest, shallowest, most grueling run-out I know is the Vallee Blanche at Chamonix. Miles and miles of a slope so gradual that if you are not tucked or not sitting on the back of the skis or skating or poling then you will stop. The scenery on the top part of the run is spectacular. Skiing through the crevasse was (n our case) truly exhilarating. The trail back to town is a PITA.
     
  10. Crank

    Crank Out on the slopes Skier

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    I think he may have been having some fun with you?

    Back in the day, Jay Peak used to hold the George Syrovatka Citizen's Downhill Race every year. We were often skiing there a week or so beforehand and I remember lots of tucking going on as folks were practicing. The last reference I can find for it is 2011.
     
  11. Mothertucker

    Mothertucker Sweep Dodger Skier

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    "Everybody's Tucking But Me"- Eartha Kitt
     
  12. Don in Morrison

    Don in Morrison I Ski Better on Retro Day Skier

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    Ah, the infamous "Texas Tuck".
     
  13. hbear

    hbear Out on the slopes Skier

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    It's actually a rounded "cat back" that is preferable in the tuck.
    Hips level or above shoulders and forward pressure on the shins.....hips should be over the boots and not back.
     
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  14. LiquidFeet

    LiquidFeet Out on the slopes Instructor

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    beginner-tuck.JPG
    Where do people get the idea that this is the way to do a tuck?
    Is there a legitimate story that explains this thing that so many people do?
     
  15. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    How is that possible if one is low?
    IMG_5822.PNG
    AL Svindal, Are 2006

    IMG_5823.PNG
    Photos by Ron Lemaster
     
  16. Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    I think we should all post pics of our best tuck :D
    When in doubt, tuck it out @Tim Flanagan

    Screen Shot 2019-02-05 at 4.45.05 PM.png
     
  17. hbear

    hbear Out on the slopes Skier

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    While it's easy to fall back when "getting low" the objective is still hips over boots. Has to do with shin pressure, trying to keep a longer/higher femur which allows one to better flex the ankle. Not only helps turning but also pressure on the ski (as the ski will wobble under speed when the pressure is not there).

    Shoulders should be below hips...airflow overback provides downward pressure.

    For the extreme, check out the speed skiers....not downhill....actual speed skiers. Body morphology can make it difficult but your greatest weight is in the hips/glutes....to get CM forward, that body mass needs to move forward as well.

    Here's one of our Canadians (Manny) in the tunnel....note hips vs. referencing the back of the glutes.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2019
  18. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    IMG_5824.jpg
    Still not seeing it. His boots would need like 30 deg of forward lean to get his hips over his heels. Depends a lot on tibia and femur lengths.

    Here's the speed skier. Maybe he achieves hips over heels with 29deg of forward lean. Though I'm not sure how it's measured.

    IMG_5825.jpg
    https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/the-aerodynamics-of-speed-skiing
     
  19. Thread Starter
    TS
    Pequenita

    Pequenita Out on the slopes Skier

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    If someone’s never raced before, it’s pretty easy to think that a tuck consists mostly of bringing the torso towards the knees and curling the arms so that the poles point behind. I don’t think most recreational skiers really pay that close attention to a racer’s tuck position, and this *feels* close enough.
     
  20. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    Yep. You can demo it in front of them and they'll still do the porcupine position by default.
     

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