Toe Piece Mount on Tyrolia Attack2 13

Discussion in 'Tuning Techniques and Tool Information' started by Kendall slay, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. Kendall slay

    Kendall slay Booting up Skier

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    Recently had a set of Attack 13's mounted on a ski, after skiing them yesterday and was letting them stand up when I got home for some odd reason I looked at the toe piece and decide to place the boots in each ski, I then noticed the left toe pushed all the way down on the AFD and pretty large gap on the right ski. I was once told that on the Attack 13 you should be able to slide a business card between the toe and AFD, is this correct? I'm assuming a toe adjustment and release check?
     
  2. Wilhelmson

    Wilhelmson Out on the slopes Skier

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    That's what I had to do for my kid on attack 11 demos. No more pre-releases. His had a screw that needed almost a full turn. To expose the full space I had to hold the ski down with one arm and pull back on the cuff of the boot. Otherwise you could be fooled into thinking that the left toe spacing is fine, but it's just as big as the one on the other ski. At least you didn't have to do two supermans to figure it out.
     
  3. Wilhelmson

    Wilhelmson Out on the slopes Skier

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    For anyone looking here are before and after photos. I had to slide in two paper gift cards for a tight fit; not sure if that's still a little loose. These were mounted at a shop so never hurts to check your spacing!


    Before.jpg After.jpg
     
  4. Chris Axebiker

    Chris Axebiker Booting up Skier

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    Looks awfully loose to me. It's not so much about the "space"; it's about the "pressure". You might not really see the space, but a .5mm card should be able to be slid between the surfaces with enough pressure to feel, but not buckle the card.
     
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  5. DanoT

    DanoT RVer-Skier Skier

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    A piece of cardboard about the thickness of a cereal box about 3" by 8" should be about right. You then tighten down the toe piece so there is slight friction when moving the cardboard back and forth.
     


  6. GregK

    GregK Getting off the lift Skier

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    Have seen a lot of Attack binding toes not set properly lately!
    As @Wilhelmson has mentioned, the key to testing for toe height is to lock the boot in, pull back on the rear boot cuff to try and “wheelie” the toe and then check for toe height with “resistance on a business card” being perfect. I place the skis on the carpet with my knee standing on the ski behind the bindings and then it’s easy to pull the boot cuff back with one hand and check for toe height with your other hand.

    Be sure to test with both boots as they might be different
     
  7. DanoT

    DanoT RVer-Skier Skier

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    While a business card is pretty much the correct thickness, it is too short to grasp and then slide back and forth to guage the correct resistance or friction.
     
  8. GregK

    GregK Getting off the lift Skier

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    I’ve got laminated cards that’s the same size as a business card and it comes out the other side of the boot toe and can still grab it without issue. I have used the longer binding factory spacing testers as well but find no difference in ease of adjustment.

    If it’s an issue, simply place the card so it sticks out so you can grab it and then adjust the toe until it’s resisting when trying to pull it out and then test to see if the other side of the boot toe resists the same way. Takes 15 secs this way rather than the 10 secs of having the factory spacer tester. lol
     
  9. Thread Starter
    TS
    Kendall slay

    Kendall slay Booting up Skier

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    That is exactly what I thought that you had to have a light pressure when checking. The sad part behind all of this, I went back to the shop and the manager on duty whom is a snowboarder had me take my skis back into the shop and as I was explaining to the mechanic the issue, the first thing he said was I know you're not trying to say your skis weren't mounted correctly because I'm the 1 who mounted them, really disappointed me because he was angered and I came in with the approach of curiosity but I knew it was way off. He then took a screw driver and started to screw the pressure on the toe piece up and down with no change and then told me that it was up high because there wasn't any forward pressure on the boot and then cranked the Din up. Then I became angry because he thought I didn't know any better or his lack of knowledge and I didn't say anything, I have an excellent relationship with the Manager who wasn't there, but I took my skis elsewhere and it has severed a long time relationship. The gap was really noticeable to the level of shock when I noticed it and to think I was skiing pretty hard on them.
     
  10. GregK

    GregK Getting off the lift Skier

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    Wow, seems like you’re better off dealing with more qualified techs! Hope you eventually got them adjusted properly and got the DIN set at the right level.
     
  11. Wilhelmson

    Wilhelmson Out on the slopes Skier

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    Good eye!

    I purchased an auto feeler gauge and the business card with resistance is in fact the correct measurement for 0.5 mm toe height spacing.

    To summarize (hopefully):

    Set DIN adjustment and forward pressure first.

    Click in boot and pull back on cuff like your life depends on it.

    Adjust toe height so that a business card or 0.5 mm (or specified gap) gauge encounters resistance but can still slide between toe and plate.

    Check even if set by a shop.

    Have bindings tested.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
  12. L&AirC

    L&AirC PSIA Instructor and USSA Coach Skier

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    The only thing I would add is to make sure you first make the correct selection on the AFD for Tour, Alpine Grip Walk or whatever the selections are (going from memory). I believe the way it works is this is a "gross" adjustment and the screw at the front of the toe piece is a "fine" adjustment.

    Ken
     
  13. raytseng

    raytseng Out on the slopes Skier

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    I've posted this before, but to get pedantic, a standard thickness business card is thinner than .5mm.
    Typically it is going to be 14 or 15point cardstock= .014inches thick=.3566mm.
    So you either have super premium business cards, your feeler gauge maybe off or too hard to accurately feel the difference.

    You can check against the common standard of a credit card that is 30mil or .030inches thick=.756mm.
    If 2 business cards are just about or just under 1 creditcard thick then it's actually 14 or 15pt cardstock.

    So assuming your business card is actually .3566mm, and you want to hit .5mm; then 1 business card should still be able to be slid out with almost no resistance, but 2 business cards (or 1 creditcard) should definitely hold and not be able to be pulled out.

    Of course if you're using something like a hotel keycard that's thicker than a business card but still thinner than a credit card, then you're got a tool that probably closer to .5mm.

    As far as my aaattack demos, there's only the 1 screw to do the height adjustment, there isn't a separate switch or toggle to do the coarse change.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2019

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