cantunamunch

Meh
Skier
Joined
Nov 17, 2015
Posts
9,034
I greatly appreciate all of the suggestions and information provided! I apologize if my initial post was not clear. I should have began with one topic.
Gotcha. I had assumed all you wanted to do at first was puttering about on the golf course. Meaning diagonal stride shuffling and breaking trail, not skate.

Since I initially skied in Frisco and saw the skate-skiers, that has been what I had wanted to participate in, or at least try. Since there are no local groomed trails, renting would be the way to go.
Strictly speaking, once you have the technique fairly down, you don't actually need groomed trails. Hard crust - refrozen part melt- works amazingly well, so long as it's not completely broken. Since we see snow so rarely down here, there's a group (read: OK, fewer than 10) of us crazies who like to skate crusted snowplow throw, especially along median strips (read: fewer pedestrians postholing).

I will re-read all of the posts and decide how much I want to spend to finally get into this activity.
Since you mention Frisco, I will point to https://recyclesportsfrisco.com/ - you might be able to find booties to work with the Dovres and you will see boots that worked with the Splitkeins back in the day.
 

Wilhelmson

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
May 2, 2017
Posts
1,925
There is hope at woodenskis.com. idk where my 10.5 are otherwise you would be all set.
 

jt10000

Putting on skis
Skier
Joined
Apr 21, 2019
Posts
42
Location
New York City
Strictly speaking, once you have the technique fairly down, you don't actually need groomed trails. Hard crust - refrozen part melt- works amazingly well, so long as it's not completely broken. Since we see snow so rarely down here, there's a group (read: OK, fewer than 10) of us crazies who like to skate crusted snowplow throw, especially along median strips (read: fewer pedestrians postholing).
Yup - and when really desperate I've "groomed" a short loop of 100m by skiing over it again and again and again, to compact the snow. (I'm done with that nowadays).

Some years ago there was a massive sleet overnight where I live (Manhattan) that tightened up overnight and was super for skate skiing in our Central Park. But that was a once in a decade thing there - good snow to skate before most people got up and walked on it. I had such a blast.
 

tch

What do I know; I'm just some guy on the internet.
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
630
Location
New England
While we're on this topic: frozen lakes with windpack. I have a north/south lake (dammed river) that is 1.5 miles long. Some of my best skates have been there.
 

Ski&ride

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Mar 15, 2018
Posts
1,064
XCountry skiers tend to be gear geeks. At least when I started asking questions. It went well over my head really quick!

So here’s what I did and it had served me well:

1) start with boots! “Combi” boots!!!

Why? “Combi”is a term for boots that are stiff enough to skate yet soft enough to stride (“classic”). Further, it’s semi-high cuff is good enough even for “light” back country duty!

2) Most Combi boots have NNN binding. So that’s what you look for in skis.

3) These days, more and more skis comes with bindings. So keep that in mind when pricing skis.
--a) make site it’s got NNN binding (probably 90% of skis anyway),
—b) NNN is mow the de facto standard for both classic and skate skis.
—c) you can put (regular) NNN binding on back country skis.

4) Skis are sized by weight. You need to get the right length for your weight. Don’t get too obsessed with performance for your first purchase. Just get the right length first.

Again, get the boot that fits. You can keep buying skis as you interest expands.
 
Top