xcountry

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I have cross-country skied at Kings Canyon National Park 30 years ago and again a decade ago at Frisco Nordic Center. While swooshing along on the two tracks, someone whizzed by on the groomed trail, which looked like it would be much more fun. I stepped onto that trail and could not emulate what I found later to be referred to as skate-skiing. Later, when I returned my skis, I was told that I needed special skis. I had finally decided to make the two hour drive to Frisco this season, rent and see if I like the "exhausting" workout of skate skiing but the resorts are now closed.
Recently, I pulled skis out of a dumpster and one of the bindings was broken. I did some research and found the 3-pin to be an outdated style and I found replacement bindings on Ebay for $4 so I clicked purchase and installed.

What style of used bindings or boots shall I purchase to use with my "new" skis? Folks here in Northern Colorado tend to use the local golf course after a snow. The Poudre Canyon is also a short drive.

Skis-Rossignol acrylite 49
old bindings-dovre
new old bindings-rottefella
 

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Thread Starter
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xcountry

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I failed to mention that I have not been downhill skiing for about 15 years and back then I was skiing blues.
6' tall
180lbs
 

Wilhelmson

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If you look around you can find some boots for those 3 pins. I have broken wooden skis jumping off rocks before the binding broke.

Do the skis have a kick zone? You need that for propulsion or you have to get xc wax.

Since we are bored, i once saw an ex Olympian (tall dude light hair) skiing an icy blue alpine trail on skate skis very easily. I could barely make it down the same trail on xc in ok snow. Another time i hiked a ways up mittersil after midnight in a blizzard and skied down it was uphill all the way. Fun times and you dont need skate skis but you do need gripwax.
 
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cantunamunch

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The 50mm three pins are dead in the water - finding usable 50 year old race boots is not going to happen, certainly not on the cheap.

There are still boots available that will fit the 75 mm three pin bindings, but you have to be careful about lug thickness. Most of the modern three pin lug boots have lugs ~20mm or thicker and those old Dovres will have problems closing on lugs that thick.


Your other option is to change to NNN compatible - should be doable for $50 a pair maybe less. Boots will be a lot easier to source.
 

jt10000

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On groomed flat terrain, with the right equipment and moderate skill, skate skiing is easy. My partner is not particularly athletic, but used to zoom around on skate skis after taking lessons and drilling quite a bit.

Those skis you have are not very good for anything unless you are into vintage stuff. I would strongly recommend not spending money to be able to use them. They are 40+ years old. There have been big advances in skis, boots, and bindings since then.

Get some newer stuff. But renting next season is the way to go to get a better sense on what you want.

And take a lesson. If you think you have good technique for diagonal striding, maybe you can skip that, but if you want to skate right take a lesson.

PS: Stuff from, say, 20 years ago can be very good if you know what you're looking for. One of my best skis is about that old, using binding system that is still great today and modern boots. But not the 1970s except for low-level shuffling along.
 

Wendy

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On groomed flat terrain, with the right equipment and moderate skill, skate skiing is easy. My partner is not particularly athletic, but used to zoom around on skate skis after taking lessons and drilling quite a bit.

Those skis you have are not very good for anything unless you are into vintage stuff. I would strongly recommend not spending money to be able to use them. They are 40+ years old. There have been big advances in skis, boots, and bindings since then.

Get some newer stuff. But renting next season is the way to go to get a better sense on what you want.

And take a lesson. If you think you have good technique for diagonal striding, maybe you can skip that, but if you want to skate right take a lesson.

PS: Stuff from, say, 20 years ago can be very good if you know what you're looking for. One of my best skis is about that old, using binding system that is still great today and modern boots. But not the 1970s except for low-level shuffling along.
Agree, I have a pair of Atomic skate skis from around 2000 that are still very good...,binding system is in use today (Salomon Pilot) and new boots still compatible with those bindings. The Atomics don’t feel much different from a much newer pair of Salomon skate skis I have.

If you’re planning to skate, you’ll need to have some glide wax and an iron. You also need poles that are the correct height....much higher (about up to your nose, I think) than poles for classic XC, unless you want to skate without poles for a better balance workout.
 
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Tony S

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Recently, I pulled skis out of a dumpster
There's a reason they were in the dumpster.

It's possible to find useable gear this way if you are determined and patient and lucky if you know what you're looking for. But you don't.

If you want to try skate skiing, you should drive up to Frisco next winter and spend the $75 or whatever it is to rent the gear and take a lesson. Then at least you will have a jumping off place in terms of the state of xc in the 21st century.

Meanwhile do some Googling on the topic.
 
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xcountry

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I appreciate the quick response and suggestions!
50mm? Thanks for the information as now I know what the "75mm" in the eBay boots adds refers to. There are no 50mm boots available and very few in a male, size 10, 75mm.
Knowing that the skis were old I did not want to spend much to make them usable. Now I must decide if I want to spend $15 to change the bindings to 75mm and another $50 for boots and $20 for poles in order to have something to scoot around the golf coarse with. Then there is the issue of learning how to use wax correctly.
A link to a modern package for sale for $265 after shipping...https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cross-Country-Package-160cm-Whitewood-WAXABLE-Skis-NNN-BC-bindings-Boots-Poles/232489810612?hash=item362178fab4%3Ag%3AY-4AAOSw9GhYlNYK&LH_BIN=1
1585494259576.png


1585494192687.png

I found this site to be quite helpful...
 

tch

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To be honest, I think you are throwing money away trying to make these "free" skis usable. Like investing money into an exhaust system for an old, clapped-out Yugo.
For my money, buy some new waxless skis with NNN bindings and the most supportive boots you can find. You will save money in the end.

One link: https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/119674?page=adults-discovery-positrack-ifp-ski-set-with-x5-boot&bc=29-516714&feat=516714-GN0&csp=f&pos=2
I'm sure you could find other deals: REI, etc.

Re the wooden skis: keep them for beauty/antique reasons.
 

Tony S

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To be honest, I think you are throwing money away trying to make these "free" skis usable. Like investing money into an exhaust system for an old, clapped-out Yugo.
For my money, buy some new waxless skis with NNN bindings and the most supportive boots you can find. You will save money in the end.

One link: https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/119674?page=adults-discovery-positrack-ifp-ski-set-with-x5-boot&bc=29-516714&feat=516714-GN0&csp=f&pos=2
I'm sure you could find other deals: REI, etc.

Re the wooden skis: keep them for beauty/antique reasons.
Yeah, I can't tell if he's actually asking us for anything. Notice that the skis are 215s. Is he big enough for those? Does he care? The used boots in the photo are worth maybe $5.00 tops. Dime a dozen at ski swaps in the fall. Etc.
 

Wendy

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I appreciate the quick response and suggestions!
50mm? Thanks for the information as now I know what the "75mm" in the eBay boots adds refers to. There are no 50mm boots available and very few in a male, size 10, 75mm.
Knowing that the skis were old I did not want to spend much to make them usable. Now I must decide if I want to spend $15 to change the bindings to 75mm and another $50 for boots and $20 for poles in order to have something to scoot around the golf coarse with. Then there is the issue of learning how to use wax correctly.
A link to a modern package for sale for $265 after shipping...https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cross-Country-Package-160cm-Whitewood-WAXABLE-Skis-NNN-BC-bindings-Boots-Poles/232489810612?hash=item362178fab4%3Ag%3AY-4AAOSw9GhYlNYK&LH_BIN=1
View attachment 98200

View attachment 98199
I found this site to be quite helpful...
I’m still not sure from your original post if you plan to skate or classic.
If you plan to skate, those boots pictured above are gonna kill you, unless you’ve got ankles of steel. You need foot/ankle support when skating and a really good fitting boot. Classic, you can get away with a lower, softer boot and slightly looser fit (though I’m picky about fit....my boots need to fit WELL).

Waxing for skating is easier as long as you have a wax sufficient for snow temps, an iron, and a brush. You can’t do it on the snow unless you’re satisfied with just rubbing on some wax and having marginal glide. A universal wax will work but isn’t as fast. Waxing for classic can be a bit trickier as you need to account for both kick and glide.

The skis you have are long and heavy. Not a good feel if you want to start out having fun. Me? If I started on that stuff I’d quit out of frustration.Also, if you aren’t in shape, skating on that old stuff is going to tire you out fast....maybe even if you’re in shape. Skating is one of the most aerobically intense sports out there, and that’s why the equipment matters, not just for performance, but for enjoyment.

If you start with good, appropriate equipment, you’re going to have a better time and then that will increase your motivation to get better. I rented skate equipment when I first started, and then when I got bit by the bug, bought gear on sale that spring. I had just enough experience to know what questions to ask and what to look for.
 
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ScottB

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It looks to me like you have classic wax able skis with 3 pin bindings. You can buy and mount modern bindings and boots if you want. They can be transferred to new skis when you are ready. You mention skating which requires specialized skis, boots, and bindings. Not what you have. Also you need a groomed track to skate, not an ungroomed golf course. What your setup is made for, assuming you get used boots to fit your new bindings, is classic xcountry using gripper wax to get stiction from the middle of the ski. You need several temp dependent gripper waxes applied by hand. This was exactly my first ever setup. Everyone now uses wax less skis with fish scales molded into the bottom.

Skating gear is a whole different beast and you need a smooth track for it. I believe skating skis have no fish scales and only use glide wax. Probably less camber in the ski too. I have never been on skating gear, so I am guessing here.

I suggest you get a $200 new fish scale classic set up for off trail and hit the golf course.
 
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ScottB

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Tony,

You xcountry skate, how are the skis different from classic fish scales?
 

tch

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Skate skis: 1)have no scales or wax pocket for kick wax, 2)have bases optimized for glide wax, 3)are stiffer torsionally and usually longitudinally, 4)are narrower and lighter than diagonal skis, 5)have little or no sidecut.
 

Wendy

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Skate skis: 1)have no scales or wax pocket for kick wax, 2)have bases optimized for glide wax, 3)are stiffer torsionally and usually longitudinally, 4)are narrower and lighter than diagonal skis, 5)have little or no sidecut.
Often more camber, not less, too. If I had mine here I’d line them up in profile to show you.
 
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