1chris5

Getting off the lift
Skier
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Posts
333
Location
Chester Springs, PA
1chris5, here are my responses to your post in red.

I am obsessed with the infinity move. .... Good!
I do also think about little toe edges but that's about it. Yes, the little toe edge (LTE) is involved.
....My question in this is, what is the minimum level of competence needed to achieve the infinity move? Is it railroad tracks? RRTrx are not necessary for doing the "Infinity Move."
....By this I mean a virtual 50/50 weighting of the inside and outside ski. 50-50 weight distribution is not relevant for the "Infinity Move."
....The pictures and videos always depict level 9 and above elite skiers. Not necessary; I can do it and I'm no Level 9 Elite skier.
....Approximately what skill level (1-9) does the infintiy move begin at and what technique should a skier use to reach this minimum level? Let's forget the skill level business and get the technique cleared up so you can learn it.

1. Do you have upper body/lower body separation?
You need to be able to have your skis turn without your upper body turning. Why? Because skiing is a foot-leg sport. You need to motor your turns with your feet/legs, not with your upper body. Allowing your skis to turn without involving the whole-body will improve your balance and open up the possibility of short radius turns on all terrain.
2. Do you have angulation? You need to be able to create edge angles by shortening one leg and lengthening the other, while keeping the upper body upright (not tilted, not banked, not leaning in). Why? You need to motor your turns with your feet/legs, not with your upper body. Tipping your skis without involving whole-body lean will improve your balance and open up the possibility of short radius turns on all terrain.
3. Got those two? Now work on your short radius turns. Why? Because feeling the "infinity move" do its thing is easier when doing short radius turns. You'll be able to feel it clearly when it kicks in. There will be no lack of certainty.
4. Before Bob called this the "Infinity Move," I thought of it as moving your feet in a "Sideways Figure Eight" beneath your hips/upper body. Does that make sense? When sliding, one can slide those feet in all kinds of directions, because they aren't stuck to the ground ... as long as the upper body is not turning and tilting along with the skis (thus #1 and #2 above).
5. When you've got the short radius turns with separation and angulation, start paying attention to where your two feet are relative to your hips as they slide around under your hips/upper body. Constantly being aware of this is essential; you can train yourself to pay attention. Make short radius turns, and pay close attention to the location of your feet; do they stay downhill of the hips at the end of the turn? Do they go out to the side of the hips at the middle of the turn? Do they stay under your hips the whole turn? Just pay attention.... No fair looking; do this by Braille.
6. Next, work on fully completing your turns. Make your skis turn to point totally across the hill at the end of your turns. Work on doing this consistently in your short radius turns, while paying attention to where the feet are in relation to the hips above them.
7. Now start working for the prize.... Bring your inside foot back up under your inside hip as you complete your turns. Do not let it stay downhill of your hips, not even a tiny wee bit downhill of your hips. How? Do this by shortening that inside leg and tipping that inside foot/ski more and more to its LTE. Shorten that leg to bring that foot up under you. You may turn it as well to head back up the hill under you. This movement pattern is essential. Feel it happening, and feel how close the foot comes up under the hip above it.
8. You will find that the outside foot/ski also comes up under you along with the inside foot/ski, as the turn is completed. When those two feet are heading back up under you at the end of the turns, they are following the path of one lobe of the Sideways Figure Eight/Infinity shape. You are doing it, sorta.
9. Time to hit the jackpot: "over-complete" your turns. Do this by bringing both feet back up under your body so far that your hips and your whole upper body end up, by default, downhill of your feet. It makes sense to call this "Over-Completing" the turns. If you are able to track where your feet are relative to your hips, you'll know when you are doing this... no fair looking; you'll fall on your head.
10. When your feet get above your body on the hill (even a tiny wee bit), you'll topple onto your new edges without having to do anything else. Your body will have crossed over your skis without you moving it there; the skis will consequently tip onto new edges. Your Sideways-Figure-Eight-Infinity-Move will have initiated your next turn simply because you "over-completed" the last turn. Your feet will have followed one lobe of the Infinity-Move-Sideways-Figure-Eight path.
11. This is what Bob calls the "do nothing" initiation. You didn't initiate anything, you simply completed the last turn.
12. The first time this works, hold onto your socks. You will be surprised at the sensation. That next turn will happen lickity-split fast. Enjoy!

Now, I may be totally embarrassed by Bob posting that I've go this totally all wrong. It works for me this way, nevertheless.
Thanks for this very detailed response. I look forward to checking these items off via my technique. Frankly, I thought I was doing the infinity move (at least on occasion). I am going to carefully review this. Cheers
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
3,685
Location
Boston Suburbs
again not seeing the white pass turn..... are you sure it was nt just a drill they did?
No guarantee my memory or understanding is correct, but I thought it was a specialized move for when the course set was too wide to ski a clean line around. Going to the inside ski had the benefit of moving them uphill by one step.
 

LiquidFeet

lurking
Instructor
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
2,657
Location
New England
Here's Bob's visual provided in his original post. At the end of that post, he said,
"Within this animation lie answers to many questions--in particular the often-discussed (and therefore ultimately confusing) role of fore-aft and lateral movements of the body relative to the feet. There is much to discuss here. Go for it!"
 
Last edited:

Chris Geib

cgeib
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
249
Location
Dillon, CO
again not seeing the white pass turn..... are you sure it was nt just a drill they did?

Hi Josh, my understanding is the term White Pass Turn (or Move, or Lean) was coined following observations of the Mahre's skiing where they moved across aggressively and deep into the new turn on the new inside ski with the old inside ski being pulled off the snow (or moved to the new inside ski momentarily as a delay to adjust/correct timing) then engaging the new outside ski in (or about) the fall-line in the new turn.

Then the White Pass Turn drill came about following the observations in their skiing.

I think most White Pass Turn "drills" in practice are one-footed skiing drills and do not focus on or capture what I understand was observed in the Mahre's White Pass Move.

I did a quick search and cannot find footage again. @Bob Barnes might have video in his archive?
 

Living Proof

We All Have The Truth
Skier
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Posts
634
Location
Philly Guy
Hi Josh, my understanding is the term White Pass Turn (or Move, or Lean) was coined following observations of the Mahre's skiing where they moved across aggressively and deep into the new turn on the new inside ski with the old inside ski being pulled off the snow (or moved to the new inside ski momentarily as a delay to adjust/correct timing) then engaging the new outside ski in (or about) the fall-line in the new turn.

Then the White Pass Turn drill came about following the observations in their skiing.

I think most White Pass Turn "drills" in practice are one-footed skiing drills and do not focus on or capture what I understand was observed in the Mahre's White Pass Move.

I did a quick search and cannot find footage again. @Bob Barnes might have video in his archive?
Years ago, I had the Mahre Brothers "Ski the Mahre Way". Memory may be poorly serving, but, the Mahre's branded the name of the move in that book. Memory tells me that the movement they are referring to was to keep all weight on the outside downhill ski at finish, and, then. roll the weighted ski to the other edge so that for a split second you are riding the uphill edge of the inside ski. I am not sure if the Mahre's advocated the extreme lifting of the new outside ski as observed in many of the White Pass turns on Youtube. As a teaching drill, if you keep the new outside high in the air, then you must release from the old turn by rolling the weighted ski. I think the movement is also referred to as a VonGrunigan turn named for the champion GS Swiss skier. In the very early PMTS teachings, Harb demonstrated a "one foot" release very similar to the Mahre movement, and, he would refer to it a a VonGrunigan turn.
Again, the above is my remembrance, and, I am known to be inaccurate. Could not find the written documents from the Mahre Book. It's always best to return to the original material, perhaps someone find the book and quote directly.

Just remembered that @Bob Barnes did teach at the Mahre clinics, so, he must have great insights.
 
Last edited:

Chris Geib

cgeib
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
249
Location
Dillon, CO
...Memory tells me that the movement they are referring to was to keep all weight on the outside downhill ski at finish, and, then. roll the weighted ski to the other edge so that for a split second you are riding the uphill edge...
Hi LP,

I am seeing when you "roll the weighted ski to the other edge" you are now on the downhill edge of this downhill (now new inside) ski at the beginning of the new turn ...having originally started on the uphill edge (of this old outside ski) prior to moving into the new turn. No?

The lifting, meh. When a drill I suspect it needs to be made visible, but that is not really the point. If you were doing tracer turns with 99.99999% of your weight on one ski the old_inside/new_outside ski would stay on the snow and all else would be the same.
 

Living Proof

We All Have The Truth
Skier
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Posts
634
Location
Philly Guy
Hi LP,
I am seeing when you "roll the weighted ski to the other edge" you are now on the downhill edge of this downhill (now new inside) ski at the beginning of the new turn ...having originally started on the uphill edge (of this old outside ski) prior to moving into the new turn. No?
.
Hi Chris...long time since we made some turns

Yes, what you have written is consistent with the intent of my words.

Check out this video of Von Grunigan GS run. He makes this movement very frequently. And, he wins the GS by close to 2 seconds. Some great skiing from 20 years ago. I prefer the old GS to what is current.

 

James

Skiing the powder
Instructor
Joined
Dec 2, 2015
Posts
9,207
Almost every gs run will have a White Pass turn in it from moving in (downhill) too quickly. Or really, they are often late and have to move in to make the turn while the downhill ski is still big toe edged.

Well here's what @Bob Barnes wrote in his Encyclopedia (1999).
IMG_2082.JPG


We did White Pass with Robin Barnes once at Big Sky and brought it into the cutup powder. ( Surely Chris remembers because he herded me off a cliff at Big Sky).

They're good for getting people to commit down hill. It doesn't work otherwise. For some reason people make them complicated and mysterious. They're not.
Perhaps it's the name.
 

1chris5

Getting off the lift
Skier
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Posts
333
Location
Chester Springs, PA
1chris5, here are my responses to your post in red.

I am obsessed with the infinity move. .... Good!
I do also think about little toe edges but that's about it. Yes, the little toe edge (LTE) is involved.
....My question in this is, what is the minimum level of competence needed to achieve the infinity move? Is it railroad tracks? RRTrx are not necessary for doing the "Infinity Move."
....By this I mean a virtual 50/50 weighting of the inside and outside ski. 50-50 weight distribution is not relevant for the "Infinity Move."
....The pictures and videos always depict level 9 and above elite skiers. Not necessary; I can do it and I'm no Level 9 Elite skier.
....Approximately what skill level (1-9) does the infintiy move begin at and what technique should a skier use to reach this minimum level? Let's forget the skill level business and get the technique cleared up so you can learn it.

1. Do you have upper body/lower body separation?
You need to be able to have your skis turn without your upper body turning. Why? Because skiing is a foot-leg sport. You need to motor your turns with your feet/legs, not with your upper body. Allowing your skis to turn without involving the whole-body will improve your balance and open up the possibility of short radius turns on all terrain.
2. Do you have angulation? You need to be able to create edge angles by shortening one leg and lengthening the other, while keeping the upper body upright (not tilted, not banked, not leaning in). Why? You need to motor your turns with your feet/legs, not with your upper body. Tipping your skis without involving whole-body lean will improve your balance and open up the possibility of short radius turns on all terrain.
3. Got those two? Now work on your short radius turns. Why? Because feeling the "infinity move" do its thing is easier when doing short radius turns. You'll be able to feel it clearly when it kicks in. There will be no lack of certainty.
4. Before Bob called this the "Infinity Move," I thought of it as moving your feet in a "Sideways Figure Eight" beneath your hips/upper body. Does that make sense? When sliding, one can slide those feet in all kinds of directions, because they aren't stuck to the ground ... as long as the upper body is not turning and tilting along with the skis (thus #1 and #2 above).
5. When you've got the short radius turns with separation and angulation, start paying attention to where your two feet are relative to your hips as they slide around under your hips/upper body. Constantly being aware of this is essential; you can train yourself to pay attention. Make short radius turns, and pay close attention to the location of your feet; do they stay downhill of the hips at the end of the turn? Do they go out to the side of the hips at the middle of the turn? Do they stay under your hips the whole turn? Just pay attention.... No fair looking; do this by Braille.
6. Next, work on fully completing your turns. Make your skis turn to point totally across the hill at the end of your turns. Work on doing this consistently in your short radius turns, while paying attention to where the feet are in relation to the hips above them.
7. Now start working for the prize.... Bring your inside foot back up under your inside hip as you complete your turns. Do not let it stay downhill of your hips, not even a tiny wee bit downhill of your hips. How? Do this by shortening that inside leg and tipping that inside foot/ski more and more to its LTE. Shorten that leg to bring that foot up under you. You may turn it as well to head back up the hill under you. This movement pattern is essential. Feel it happening, and feel how close the foot comes up under the hip above it.
8. You will find that the outside foot/ski also comes up under you along with the inside foot/ski, as the turn is completed. When those two feet are heading back up under you at the end of the turns, they are following the path of one lobe of the Sideways Figure Eight/Infinity shape. You are doing it, sorta.
9. Time to hit the jackpot: "over-complete" your turns. Do this by bringing both feet back up under your body so far that your hips and your whole upper body end up, by default, downhill of your feet. It makes sense to call this "Over-Completing" the turns. If you are able to track where your feet are relative to your hips, you'll know when you are doing this... no fair looking; you'll fall on your head.
10. When your feet get above your body (technically, your center of mass) on the hill (even a tiny wee bit), you'll topple onto your new edges without having to do anything else. Your body will have crossed over your skis without you moving it there; the skis will consequently tip onto new edges. Your Sideways-Figure-Eight-Infinity-Move will have initiated your next turn simply because you "over-completed" the last turn. Your feet will have followed one lobe of the Infinity-Move-Sideways-Figure-Eight path. Repeat as you link short radius turns, and you'll feel your feet moving along that Sideways Eight underneath your body quite clearly. A similar version applies to medium and long radius turns, but it's not as dramatic to feel as you are learning it.
11. This is what Bob calls the "do nothing" initiation. You didn't initiate anything, you simply completed the last turn. (I think he used that phrase....)
12. The first time this works, hold onto your socks. You will be surprised at the sensation. That next turn will happen lickity-split fast and unexpectedly, because you didn't make it happen the usual way. Enjoy!

Now, I may be totally embarrassed by Bob posting that I've go this totally all wrong. It works for me this way, nevertheless.
Hi @LiquidFeet - thanks for this great feedback and I finally got back on the snow, since this post, due to weather. I skied with your list in mind. I think I'm good. I need to continually work on "over-completing" my turns but I feel how after the transition; the skis turn themselves ("do nothing initiation"). I don't feel a funny thing in my belly when in transition (as reported by others), but I do feel weightlessness. I was also throwing my upper body forward a little bit to make sure I was getting that move correct. I really appreciate your help and will keep this list handy when I start up again next year. Cheers, Chris
 

Mendieta

Master of Snowplow
Pugski Ski Tester
Contributor
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Posts
4,208
Location
SF Bay Area, CA, USA
1chris5, here are my responses to your post in red.

I am obsessed with the infinity move. .... Good!
I do also think about little toe edges but that's about it. Yes, the little toe edge (LTE) is involved.
....My question in this is, what is the minimum level of competence needed to achieve the infinity move? Is it railroad tracks? RRTrx are not necessary for doing the "Infinity Move."
....By this I mean a virtual 50/50 weighting of the inside and outside ski. 50-50 weight distribution is not relevant for the "Infinity Move."
....The pictures and videos always depict level 9 and above elite skiers. Not necessary; I can do it and I'm no Level 9 Elite skier.
....Approximately what skill level (1-9) does the infintiy move begin at and what technique should a skier use to reach this minimum level? Let's forget the skill level business and get the technique cleared up so you can learn it.

1. Do you have upper body/lower body separation?
You need to be able to have your skis turn without your upper body turning. Why? Because skiing is a foot-leg sport. You need to motor your turns with your feet/legs, not with your upper body. Allowing your skis to turn without involving the whole-body will improve your balance and open up the possibility of short radius turns on all terrain.
2. Do you have angulation? You need to be able to create edge angles by shortening one leg and lengthening the other, while keeping the upper body upright (not tilted, not banked, not leaning in). Why? You need to motor your turns with your feet/legs, not with your upper body. Tipping your skis without involving whole-body lean will improve your balance and open up the possibility of short radius turns on all terrain.
3. Got those two? Now work on your short radius turns. Why? Because feeling the "infinity move" do its thing is easier when doing short radius turns. You'll be able to feel it clearly when it kicks in. There will be no lack of certainty.
4. Before Bob called this the "Infinity Move," I thought of it as moving your feet in a "Sideways Figure Eight" beneath your hips/upper body. Does that make sense? When sliding, one can slide those feet in all kinds of directions, because they aren't stuck to the ground ... as long as the upper body is not turning and tilting along with the skis (thus #1 and #2 above).
5. When you've got the short radius turns with separation and angulation, start paying attention to where your two feet are relative to your hips as they slide around under your hips/upper body. Constantly being aware of this is essential; you can train yourself to pay attention. Make short radius turns, and pay close attention to the location of your feet; do they stay downhill of the hips at the end of the turn? Do they go out to the side of the hips at the middle of the turn? Do they stay under your hips the whole turn? Just pay attention.... No fair looking; do this by Braille.
6. Next, work on fully completing your turns. Make your skis turn to point totally across the hill at the end of your turns. Work on doing this consistently in your short radius turns, while paying attention to where the feet are in relation to the hips above them.
7. Now start working for the prize.... Bring your inside foot back up under your inside hip as you complete your turns. Do not let it stay downhill of your hips, not even a tiny wee bit downhill of your hips. How? Do this by shortening that inside leg and tipping that inside foot/ski more and more to its LTE. Shorten that leg to bring that foot up under you. You may turn it as well to head back up the hill under you. This movement pattern is essential. Feel it happening, and feel how close the foot comes up under the hip above it.
8. You will find that the outside foot/ski also comes up under you along with the inside foot/ski, as the turn is completed. When those two feet are heading back up under you at the end of the turns, they are following the path of one lobe of the Sideways Figure Eight/Infinity shape. You are doing it, sorta.
9. Time to hit the jackpot: "over-complete" your turns. Do this by bringing both feet back up under your body so far that your hips and your whole upper body end up, by default, downhill of your feet. It makes sense to call this "Over-Completing" the turns. If you are able to track where your feet are relative to your hips, you'll know when you are doing this... no fair looking; you'll fall on your head.
10. When your feet get above your body (technically, your center of mass) on the hill (even a tiny wee bit), you'll topple onto your new edges without having to do anything else. Your body will have crossed over your skis without you moving it there; the skis will consequently tip onto new edges. Your Sideways-Figure-Eight-Infinity-Move will have initiated your next turn simply because you "over-completed" the last turn. Your feet will have followed one lobe of the Infinity-Move-Sideways-Figure-Eight path. Repeat as you link short radius turns, and you'll feel your feet moving along that Sideways Eight underneath your body quite clearly. A similar version applies to medium and long radius turns, but it's not as dramatic to feel as you are learning it.
11. This is what Bob calls the "do nothing" initiation. You didn't initiate anything, you simply completed the last turn. (I think he used that phrase....)
12. The first time this works, hold onto your socks. You will be surprised at the sensation. That next turn will happen lickity-split fast and unexpectedly, because you didn't make it happen the usual way. Enjoy!

Now, I may be totally embarrassed by Bob posting that I've go this totally all wrong. It works for me this way, nevertheless.
Thank you so much for taking the time to provide such a clear, no nonsense post, @LiquidFeet . @Lorenzzo made reference to it today, on the lift. He literally said this is one of the brightest posts he has seen in a long time, in terms of technique discussion, so I went back to re-reading it. I will work around these fundamentals. I think @razie also rightly points the importance of separation. I believe it is the single breakthrough that opens everything up. Working on it :)
 

markojp

mtn rep for the gear on my feet
Industry Insider
Instructor
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
3,541
Location
PNW aka SEA
Good stuff aplenty in this thread! The other sensation that will click when it all comes together is the feeling that you've accessed a whole new universe of your functional 'range of motion'. Abduction, adduction, obliques, etc... as your 'CMU' skiing era ends. What's CMU? Concrete Masonary Unit... you'll stop skiing like a human brick. ogsmile Instructors training for their certification(s) will stop skiing like they're constipated and pushing a shopping cart.

In the end, skiing at higher levels is an athletic endeavor. Watch any accomplished athlete in any sport, and you'll immediately see their range of motion (not necessarily raw strength) vs. the rest of us trying to access the same outcomes.
This clip is a good one for visualization. We see the best 'slowing it down' to a rate and intensity that we can imagine ourselves accessing:

 
Last edited:

1chris5

Getting off the lift
Skier
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Posts
333
Location
Chester Springs, PA
Good stuff aplenty in this thread! The other sensation that will click when it all comes together is the feeling that you've accessed a whole new universe of your functional 'range of motion'. Abduction, adduction, obliques, etc... as your 'CMU' skiing era ends. What's CMU? Concrete Masonary Unit... you'll stop skiing like a human brick. ogsmile Instructors training for their certification(s) will stop skiing like they're constipated and pushing a shopping cart.

In the end, skiing at higher levels is an athletic endeavor. Watch any accomplished athlete in any sport, and you'll immediately see their range of motion (not necessarily raw strength) vs. the rest of us trying to access the same outcomes.
This clip is a good one for visualization. We see the best 'slowing it down' to a rate and intensity that we can imagine ourselves accessing:

I really like this video. Mikaela, in this video, skis with fluidity, athleticism and grace but at a level that anyone can apply to their own skiing. I've seen this video before but I am saving the link in my google keep notes and going to trim just the bit where she is actually skiing and not drilling (1:10 to 1:20). When my family gets back on skis I am going to show this to my 9 year old daughter. She is always interested in improving her skill level. I think the visual of Mikaela psuedo free-skiing in 1:10 to 1:20 will help her (and me) to visualize her next level skiing moves. I don't think it reaches the level of the Infinity Move but it is close. Here is the clip below. Cheers

 
Last edited:

markojp

mtn rep for the gear on my feet
Industry Insider
Instructor
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
3,541
Location
PNW aka SEA
Save the drills too, Chris. Look at them closely in relationship to your quest. Not trying be coy, but the infinity move has to have upper and lower body separation and we need to be aligned correctly to move accurately over the outside ski. That's what she's working on to get to 1:10 in the video. ogsmile
 

1chris5

Getting off the lift
Skier
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Posts
333
Location
Chester Springs, PA
Save the drills too, Chris. Look at them closely in relationship to your quest. Not trying be coy, but the infinity move has to have upper and lower body separation and we need to be aligned correctly to move accurately over the outside ski. That's what she's working on to get to 1:10 in the video. ogsmile
As much as I want to drill, I just don't do them. I can do the above turn but I feel like that is a perfect example to emulate. I feel like if I can keep that image in my mind, I can get close to that level of fluidity. That's why I like Bob's Infinity Move video; it teaches the end result. It allows me to intuitively put all the pieces together without having to have 10 different ski thoughts in my mind. In thinking deeply about this, I am trying to tailor a program for my kids that gets right to the point. I feel like one point is the image of Makaela performing those beautiful turns. I don't expect my kids to ski like that but I want to show them what a great turn looks like. Obviously there is a reason a great skier like her still does those simple drills. I am hoping I can get my daughter (she's 8 now) to watch and then a light bulb goes off and she thinks, that's what I want to look like. Maybe she will want to do those drills but if she doesn't, at least she has that goal in her mind. She gets close to this goal; then I can show her the Infinity Move.
 

markojp

mtn rep for the gear on my feet
Industry Insider
Instructor
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
3,541
Location
PNW aka SEA
No worries about doing the drills or not, but they're still good for us to see. I agree with showing your daughter the outcome. Kids are very visual learners.
 

john petersen

working through minutia to find the big picture!
Moderator
Instructor
Joined
May 8, 2017
Posts
327
Location
Eastern
This is one of the best threads I have ever read!....way to go gang! I do have a chart that I made when I went through my level 2 and it shows where my head was with regard to the centerline, skills concept, some sample progressions, part of the teaching model, ect.....I tried to "blend" it all into one visual. perhaps for another thread?...If anyone is interested Ill post it up.

Its taken me all night to read through this thread...had dessert, a cup o tea, kept reading....wonderful stuff.

Thanks Bob for posting it and all those who contributed....I will be thinking about this alot next season!

JP
 

Mendieta

Master of Snowplow
Pugski Ski Tester
Contributor
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Posts
4,208
Location
SF Bay Area, CA, USA
This is one of the best threads I have ever read!....way to go gang! I do have a chart that I made when I went through my level 2 and it shows where my head was with regard to the centerline, skills concept, some sample progressions, part of the teaching model, ect.....I tried to "blend" it all into one visual. perhaps for another thread?...If anyone is interested Ill post it up.

Its taken me all night to read through this thread...had dessert, a cup o tea, kept reading....wonderful stuff.

Thanks Bob for posting it and all those who contributed....I will be thinking about this alot next season!

JP
Hi JP

It would be lovely. Perhaps a new thread would be best, yes, here at the Ski School. Looking forward to it! And hopefully learn some more. Cheers!
 

Varmintmist

Bear, with furnture.
Skier
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Posts
442
Location
W PA
Here it is--the very secret of life....
Bob Barnes
Never knew what to call it, know what it feels like. I found it again on blue groomers this season when I just let the skis run after 3 years post 16 year hiatus. The explanation helps know what to look for. Now send some cold and snow and I can try finding it again.
 
Top