Suggestions 2021 Carving Ski

François Pugh

Making fresh tracks
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It seems almost everybody is concentrating on easy to ski versatile skis that carve ok. I'm going to take a different track. After 5 years of skiing, if you don't know how to ski yet you are doing it wrong, so you can now handle a good purpose-built carving ski, or you need one to learn how to ski. Hence, my suggestions:
Fischer WC SC in a 165 length or WC RC in a 178 if you ski a bigger hill or real mountain, or the Fischer curve length depends on your favourite turn radius.

Head Rebels or Speed - too many to choose without more details about you and where and how you ski and precise details about your development plans.

Stöckli ST SC or SX depending on current ability how committed you are to speed and learning.

All good skis for hard snow carving.
 

OnEdge

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I'm in a very similar situation to the OP. No race background and not a particularly good skier (conditionally reformed snowboarder), but I have two young kids in race program and want to be able follow along and understand at least some of what they are learning.

After some demo'ing last year, I have a pair of Stöckli SC's on order.
 

Philpug

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where are they for sale looking
Click the Buy it Now on the review page here:

Note: The special Pugski Price that reflects $100 off the regular price!
 

François Pugh

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Surprised no one has mentioned the elan wingman.
IMHO
Perfect width for a carving ski is 68 mm wide at the waist.
Elan Wingman width of 86 mm wide at the waist is a good width for a bridge/compromise between a carving ski and an off-piste ski.
The harder the snow the more noticeable the short fall in hard snow carving behaviour; the softer the snow the more noticeable the shortfall in soft snow off-piste performance.
 

Prosper

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After 5 years of skiing, if you don't know how to ski yet you are doing it wrong, so you can now handle a good purpose-built carving ski, or you need one to learn how to ski.
Not sure I completely agree with the above statement. As you know there are a lot of factors which determine how quickly or slowly a skier progresses. Some of the typical skier information about the OP is missing to really make a good recommendation. @beantownace if you answer the following the Pugski community might be able to help you better:
1. How many days a year do you ski?
2. How’s your boot fit?
3. Do you have other skis apart from your X-Drives and if so, what do you like or dislike about them?
4. What specific aspects of carving are you struggling with?
5. Are these new skis going to be your daily driver ie do you need more versatility from them than just carving?
 

JimL

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If you are OK with a slightly wider ski the Laser AX is an excellent choice. I am 5' 7" and 135 lb and my AX 168cm is as good a carving ski as I have ever had, while having some versatility in softer snow conditions. From the reviews the SC is even better on hard snow but less versatile.
 

DocGKR

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As mentioned previously, after a 30+ year gap, I’ve recently attempted to re-learn how to ski narrower, racing type skis. While I eventually progressed to trying real FIS race skis thanks to ScotsSkier, I also have spent a lot of time the past few seasons on “racer-ish” sport carving skis in the 70-80mm width range. I typically like my 70-80mm waist sport carvers to have about a 15-16m turn radius and usually get them at about eye level. I view these in two camps—those closer to 70mm and those nearer 80mm. The sport carvers closer to 70mm tend to offer performance reminiscent of a FIS SL in general sensation, but somewhat less energetic and aggressive, with a bit more relaxed turn, larger sweet spot, a greater tolerance of minor mistakes, tons of easy quick turning fun, but lacking the ultimate top end speed and stability of a FIS racing ski. At the other end of the spectrum, the sport carvers closer to 80mm tend to be more All Mountain in capability, offering good performance in a wide variety of terrain and snow quality—at home on groomers, bumps, spring slush, and even fresh snow up to 6” or so, and excel at a wide range of speeds and turn shapes.
 70-80mm Sport Carve.jpg
 

Choucas

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+1 on the Laser AX suggestion. It will carve nicely but is not a demanding ski. It will help you get to be a carver, not punish you for not being one. I've owned a 175 and a 168. 6' 175lbs. strong senior (is that a thing?) skier. Nod goes to the 168. Still plenty stable but more fun. I also have a pair of Laser GS in a 175 which, for me, are the best by far for making you feel very comfortable on hard snow at higher speeds. Now that I don't have to buy kid's racing skis by the peck, I can buy expensive skis and come out money ahead.
 

DocGKR

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If I desire a 12-14m radius turn, that is when I use a FIS SL. Thanks to ScotsSkier who recommended the Rossi 165 FIS SL's a while back and I've found them to be one of the most fun skis I have ever used for resort on-piste free skiing. For non-gate, free skiing, the Rossi FIS SL is quicker in turns, has a higher speed limit on-groomers, and provides better edge hold on hard ice than many wider sport carving skis. However a FIS SL is not as forgiving of errors, not as capable in fresh snow, nor is it as adaptable to as wide a variety of terrain as the wider sport carvers.
 

Ron

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not as capable in fresh snow, nor is it as adaptable to as wide a variety of terrain as the wider sport carvers.
exactly, if you want a CARVER then go 12-14, otherwise you can get away with a 70 something underfoot ski but a sport carver like a AX is not the same.
 

François Pugh

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I agree that for carving arc-2-arc turns on groomed runs, a sub 70 mm ski, full FIS race or one step down if you are a light weight is preferred and further, full camber with no rocker is also better, but radius should depend on the speed of the turns you will be making. That being said, slalom speeds and radii ere generally best suited for most skiers.
 

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