Stockli Quiver Build

Smiles

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Jan 23, 2018
Posts
6
Hi all,

I am 5'10", 176 lbs, level 9 skier or so, in my 40s, and I ski about 16 days a year -- ten on a little eastern hill and 6 somewhere out west in March.

I am trying to decide between the Stockli Laser SC and the Laser AX and between the Stormrider 95 and the Stormrider 105.

As for the SC or AX, at the little hill I spend my time going back and forth from carving lots of fast turns and doing bumps, to skiing relatively slowly with family, friends and kids where I am trying to model good skiing. So, versatility is valued. That said, on the little hill, for years I have skied slalom skis, and I've always enjoyed skis that have energy to release at the end of a turn. But, given the variable weather it seems we get, I also now want something that will power through the slush and mashed potatoes. It seems like the difference in the bumps between the two skis is marginal.

I read dawgcatching's review where he referenced the AX being an instructor ski, but I saw another post where someone said that instructors are on the SC this year. The instructor reference speaks to my desire for versatility. I've also been told that the SC is a little more fun as between the two, and that given my relative level of technical competence that I would be able to be just as versatile on the SC as the AX. I also recognize that unlike Scott, I am not at a big hill, but a little hill, and so maybe the SC would be a better choice. Unfortunately, demoing is really out of the question.

And, should I be thinking about the western trip when I evaluate the narrow ski choice? Were I to go out to a place like Steamboat in March, would I be likely to use the narrow ski most years some of the time in a given week? Or, is the SR95 or SR105 something that I would use everyday I am there and leave the SC/AX at home?

I feel like it is rare that I actually get a real powder day, so would the SR95 be a bit more versatile and a better choice in trees, bumps and on the steeps?

Given all of the above, I was thinking of it this way:
1. Laser SC and SR95 and then just take one ski out west.
2. Laser AX and SR105 and take two skis out west.
but, then I thought:
3. Laser SC and SR105 and take two skis out west.

So, the only combination I ruled out was the AX and the SR95, but as I write this I wonder if they are different enough it would make sense to do that.

As for sizing, I think the SC in the 170, though I am concerned the AX could ski a bit long in the 175 and be too short in the 167.

I get the feeling I am really overthinking this, as it doesn't seem like any approach would be wrong. But, I figured I would put it out there to get some perspective. Given that it has been about seven and eight years since I last got skis, I'd like to get as much information as possible this time around. Thanks in advance.

Smiles
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
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Reno, eNVy
Wow, not a bad choice amongst the four...on that thought..all four? :duck:You only live once and you can't take it with you. Make sure you shoot @dawgcatching a message to put a deal together for whatever you choose.
 

KevinF

Gathermeister-New England
Team Gathermeister
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
2,053
Location
New England
I got a Laser SC this past summer that I've been using at Stowe, Vermont. We've been getting sort of a mixed-bag of Eastern variable conditions. A little stiff to be a great bump ski, but they still do well. They definitely make groomers fun. Great variety of turn shapes. I doubt I'd ever take mine out West though.

I've demoed the AX but I didn't really like it. Didn't feel quick enough for how I like to ski. Reading reviews on here seems to indicate it's sensitive to mounting point... a lot of people seem to like it with the bindings mounted a little forward. Not sure where my demos were mounted... probably on the line?

I'm 6'2", 180... SC in a 170cm, AX in the 175cm.
 

BS Slarver

Out on the slopes
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Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Posts
945
Location
Big Sky MT
After much deliberation here myself on the new SR 95 regarding length, believe me, no one contemplated length more than myself.

I need to give a shout out to @Ron and @givethepigeye - Thanks guys for answering all my questions, as I too am expanding the Stockli quiver.

As @Phil notes, there is not a bad combo in any of your picks ! If you really want to go nuts put the attack demos on three of your choices and you could take three pairs with you :D

Take a second and read Ron‘s recent review of the new SR95 and pug reviews on the AX vs. SC.
I’ve spent the last 3 days on the SR 95 and after 50 years of skiing and countless skis, it’s the smoothest most bad ass ski I’ve ever been on. I have had them out ripping on the groomers, in and out of the cut up and even in a nice 12 to 18 a blower.
 

Ron

Seeking the next best ski
Pugski Ski Tester
Joined
Nov 8, 2015
Posts
6,462
Location
Steamboat Springs, Co
@Catskill carver so you like them? :)

I was strongly considering adding a SR88 but I am holding off since at this point, I feel the combo of a AX and the 95 covers the bandwidth. I will certainly be at the Stockli booth next week to see if they make any changes to the SR88.... There seems to be a significant interest here for Stockli's.
 

trailtrimmer

Stuck in the Flatlands
Skier
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Posts
801
Location
Michigan
Love my SR95's for all around soft snow use. Pop into the trees, surf open bowls, lay down tracks on soft groomers.

It's no as playful as a dedicated powder ski when it gets really deep, but it rails over mixed conditions and just likes to fly like a more supple GS ski. A killer travel ski for the west.
 

David Chaus

Epic & Ikon because I’m indecisive. Or am I?
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
2,575
Location
Stanwood, WA
I haven’t skiied the SC or AX, so take this with a grain of salt, but among those options I would go with #1. The SC seems like the better carving tool for mid-west or east, and the SR95 is a better OSQ, all mountain ski, IMHO better at going from cut up powder and crud to groomers than the SR105.

Forget what others post about which ski is one instructors use at any given location. (IIRC it was KingGrump who noted that the SC was popular with instructors at Taos).
Instructors will use all kinds of different skis, I see a lot of instructors here in the PNW on Rossi E88’s, and another bunch on Head Rallys or Titans.
 

Kurt

Alps
Instructor
Joined
Jul 2, 2017
Posts
37
Location
Switzerland
Can't go wrong with any choice you make with Stockli, they make quality skis that are super durable; your short list is great. You've read a bunch of reviews so probably not much to add. I've got 49 days this season on the AX in conditions ranging from very firm with patches of ice to 25 cm of blower powder and they handle it all, amazingly versatile. For powder days my fat skis are the preferred choice but that's to be expected. If I were focusing on honing firm snow technical skiing full time I'd add a Stockli that's a bit narrower than the AX.

Heading out west for a week - bring both; snow is never guaranteed - check out the season that CO has been having so far. Enjoy your new skis!
 

cosmoliu

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Posts
652
Location
Central CA Coast
After Dawgcatching's glowing review of the SC on EpicSki, in which he asserted that they would make you a better skier, I decided last January that I should have a pair. I called Village Bike and Scott was out, so I wound up speaking with one of the other guys. After talking a little about my skiing, and how I am particularly enamored of bumps, he thought that I might find the AX more to my liking. These days any ski I consider buying, whether narrow or wide, must have a reputation for being good in bumps. When I connected with Scott several days later he concurred, so I wound up with the AXs. Best skis I've ever owned. He set them up with Attack demo bindings, not only to allow for playing with fore-aft placement, but also because the tracks lift the boots up off the ski just a tad. I have settled on about 1 cm forward.

So anyway, that's how I decided the SC vs AX question. And the AX is my only experience with owning Stockli... So far... I am conspiring to own a pair of SR 95s as my next Stockli acquisition (Though @SkiEssentials recent review of the new Mantra has my attention momentarily diverted). I'll certainly jump if I catch wind of a screaming deal on a pair, like the PSA @Ron put up on some AXs available in Steamboat last spring at a steal. My interest in the 95s is two fold: My Rock n Rolls which fill that niche in my quiver are getting a little long in the tooth, and that I will one day in the not too distant future tire of schlepping through airports with two pairs of skis.

It's funny- Every time I see a thread that mentions AXs, I feel compelled to weigh in with my two cents. Even if my comments might not be totally relevant to the topic at hand. I've never felt that way about any other skis.

Which reminds me: I'd vote for #2 in the OP. As far as I'm concerned, my travel quiver typically gives up the two extremes of the ski condition spectrum (hard pack<< >>deep powder) in favor of performance overlap in the middle. My current travel quiver is AX and Volkl 100EIGHT.
 

Scrundy

I like beer
Skier
Joined
Nov 17, 2015
Posts
441
Location
Conklin NY
I have the SR95, SR88, AX. The 95 is about as fun of ski I ever had when we get any amount of snow, just a blast. The 88 I love also very playful, I generally ski it when semi hard and when I want to just beat the banks. The AX is my hard boiler plate ski a carving machine. Honestly I would love to just ski the 95 all the time, but over kill most of the time. Also I seem to come off the AX a lot thinking I wish I'd brought my 88s. Only when it's real hard do I enjoy the AX over the 88s.

It depends what you like to do, if you like making perfect carved turns go AX. If you like to beat around banks, get in junk get the 88s more forgiving. But the 95 is a no brainer if you are lucky enuff to ski fresh snow or tracked out snow
 

flbufl

Putting on skis
Skier
Joined
Jan 31, 2017
Posts
150
I have demoed the AX, SR95, SR105 and some other Stocklis. I agree all what you have written.

In my opinion, AX is a great working ski. Very easy, very forgiving, very reliable, and very versatile. If Stocklis are not so expensive, it should be the best choice for all ski patrols of the east coast. But what I feel, the AX lacks is the excitement and thrills.

Currently the Stockli Stormrider lines can be divided into 2 sub-lines. The 83/85/88/97 are softer, with thinner titanal plates. the 95/105/115 are stiffer, with thicker titanal under the foot.

If you are only going to buy one pair, I would still recommend the AX, or maybe the SR88 for slightly different taste.

But for two skis quiver, I think SC is a better choice for hardpack, maybe you can even consider the Laser GS. It is really very forgiving by cheater GS ski standard. For soft conditions, SR97 for finesse skier, and SR95/105 for power.

Hi all,

I am 5'10", 176 lbs, level 9 skier or so, in my 40s, and I ski about 16 days a year -- ten on a little eastern hill and 6 somewhere out west in March.

I am trying to decide between the Stockli Laser SC and the Laser AX and between the Stormrider 95 and the Stormrider 105.

As for the SC or AX, at the little hill I spend my time going back and forth from carving lots of fast turns and doing bumps, to skiing relatively slowly with family, friends and kids where I am trying to model good skiing. So, versatility is valued. That said, on the little hill, for years I have skied slalom skis, and I've always enjoyed skis that have energy to release at the end of a turn. But, given the variable weather it seems we get, I also now want something that will power through the slush and mashed potatoes. It seems like the difference in the bumps between the two skis is marginal.

I read dawgcatching's review where he referenced the AX being an instructor ski, but I saw another post where someone said that instructors are on the SC this year. The instructor reference speaks to my desire for versatility. I've also been told that the SC is a little more fun as between the two, and that given my relative level of technical competence that I would be able to be just as versatile on the SC as the AX. I also recognize that unlike Scott, I am not at a big hill, but a little hill, and so maybe the SC would be a better choice. Unfortunately, demoing is really out of the question.

And, should I be thinking about the western trip when I evaluate the narrow ski choice? Were I to go out to a place like Steamboat in March, would I be likely to use the narrow ski most years some of the time in a given week? Or, is the SR95 or SR105 something that I would use everyday I am there and leave the SC/AX at home?

I feel like it is rare that I actually get a real powder day, so would the SR95 be a bit more versatile and a better choice in trees, bumps and on the steeps?

Given all of the above, I was thinking of it this way:
1. Laser SC and SR95 and then just take one ski out west.
2. Laser AX and SR105 and take two skis out west.
but, then I thought:
3. Laser SC and SR105 and take two skis out west.

So, the only combination I ruled out was the AX and the SR95, but as I write this I wonder if they are different enough it would make sense to do that.

As for sizing, I think the SC in the 170, though I am concerned the AX could ski a bit long in the 175 and be too short in the 167.

I get the feeling I am really overthinking this, as it doesn't seem like any approach would be wrong. But, I figured I would put it out there to get some perspective. Given that it has been about seven and eight years since I last got skis, I'd like to get as much information as possible this time around. Thanks in advance.

Smiles
 

Kurt

Alps
Instructor
Joined
Jul 2, 2017
Posts
37
Location
Switzerland
After Dawgcatching's glowing review of the SC on EpicSki, in which he asserted that they would make you a better skier, I decided last January that I should have a pair. I called Village Bike and Scott was out, so I wound up speaking with one of the other guys. After talking a little about my skiing, and how I am particularly enamored of bumps, he thought that I might find the AX more to my liking. These days any ski I consider buying, whether narrow or wide, must have a reputation for being good in bumps. When I connected with Scott several days later he concurred, so I wound up with the AXs. Best skis I've ever owned. He set them up with Attack demo bindings, not only to allow for playing with fore-aft placement, but also because the tracks lift the boots up off the ski just a tad. I have settled on about 1 cm forward.

So anyway, that's how I decided the SC vs AX question. And the AX is my only experience with owning Stockli... So far... I am conspiring to own a pair of SR 95s as my next Stockli acquisition (Though @SkiEssentials recent review of the new Mantra has my attention momentarily diverted). I'll certainly jump if I catch wind of a screaming deal on a pair, like the PSA @Ron put up on some AXs available in Steamboat last spring at a steal. My interest in the 95s is two fold: My Rock n Rolls which fill that niche in my quiver are getting a little long in the tooth, and that I will one day in the not too distant future tire of schlepping through airports with two pairs of skis.

It's funny- Every time I see a thread that mentions AXs, I feel compelled to weigh in with my two cents. Even if my comments might not be totally relevant to the topic at hand. I've never felt that way about any other skis.

Which reminds me: I'd vote for #2 in the OP. As far as I'm concerned, my travel quiver typically gives up the two extremes of the ski condition spectrum (hard pack<< >>deep powder) in favor of performance overlap in the middle. My current travel quiver is AX and Volkl 100EIGHT.
Agree the AX is the best ski I've owned. Based on the 95 comments I've got to give them a run!
 

ARL67

Invisible Airwaves Crackle With Life
Skier
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Posts
597
Location
Waterloo, ON, Canada
My pick based on your home hill is the SC and 95.
I currently have the previous gen AX, owned the previous gen 95 last year, and recently rented the current SC & AX.
I think the SC will give you that great groomer ski at home. The 95 is a great OSQ for trips, or if you have some fresh and/or junky snow at home. If you show up out west and it’s deeper, then rent.

By rights , I should have the SC and not the AX as my own home hill is usually very predicatble in its conditions -> usually manicured groomers.
 

PTskier

Been goin' downhill for years....
Pass Pulled
Joined
Jun 16, 2017
Posts
583
Location
Washington, the state
A vote here for the versatility of the AX. I just spent 10 days on mine. Hard pack, 3" of fresh over soft base, deep crud, all fun. Carves like a sharp knife. They do everything better more easily.

If Village Bike & Ski is out of stock (the last I spoke with him, they were expecting two pair of 175s from Europe), try Jans.com. Jans also gives a 15% discount to veterans, a good sized help for this price range.

I agree with the comment about renting powder skis. The likelihood of getting snow too deep for the AX is a crap shoot. I live in the west and ski in the Rockies or interior B.C. several trips each year. My powder skis have more travel miles on them (never out of the bag) than skiing time.
 

givethepigeye

Really, just Rob will do
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
886
Location
The CLT (or a plane)
After much deliberation here myself on the new SR 95 regarding length, believe me, no one contemplated length more than myself.

I need to give a shout out to @Ron and @givethepigeye - Thanks guys for answering all my questions, as I too am expanding the Stockli quiver.

As @Phil notes, there is not a bad combo in any of your picks ! If you really want to go nuts put the attack demos on three of your choices and you could take three pairs with you :D

Take a second and read Ron‘s recent review of the new SR95 and pug reviews on the AX vs. SC.
I’ve spent the last 3 days on the SR 95 and after 50 years of skiing and countless skis, it’s the smoothest most bad ass ski I’ve ever been on. I have had them out ripping on the groomers, in and out of the cut up and even in a nice 12 to 18 a blower.
So I guess you liked them.....
 

SmileGuy

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Jun 19, 2017
Posts
38
Hate to say something negative about a stockli because I love them. Bought my laser sc a decade ago I guess and still a great carving ski. I credit the, with teaching me how to ski- or at least carve well. Have skied the sr88 a bunch and the laser ax and sr 95 switching it up one day demoing.

Here's my take. The old laser sc is awesome. Very forgiving stable ski. I can ski it in the bumps if needed no problem. Laser ax even more forgiving and easy to ski anywhere. I'd buy this ski.

Then we get to the stormriders. After swapping back and forth withmy monster88 dozens of times over many many ski days, they just don't work for me. Love groomers with them, but bumps and off piste they just don't work under my feet. I can't say exactly why but feels like I have trouble with staying in the sweet spot or don't like how they feather an edge. Not quite sure. I don't have this problem with the monsters which are stiff and love in the bumps or any Other ski in my quiver including supernatural 108, hell and back, and influence 115 which are all longer. The monster is nearly the exact same size in all dimensions and stiffer. The 95s I liked even less, not even enjoying the groomers, but could have been a bad tune(but same shop as the ax that I loved)

Just one mans experience, but the moral is: just because you like one stockli, doesn't mean you'll like them all. Even if you really want to like I did.
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
Pugski Ski Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
23,740
Location
Reno, eNVy
Hate to say something negative about a stockli because I love them. Bought my laser sc a decade ago I guess and still a great carving ski. I credit the, with teaching me how to ski- or at least carve well. Have skied the sr88 a bunch and the laser ax and sr 95 switching it up one day demoing.

Here's my take. The old laser sc is awesome. Very forgiving stable ski. I can ski it in the bumps if needed no problem. Laser ax even more forgiving and easy to ski anywhere. I'd buy this ski.

Then we get to the stormriders. After swapping back and forth withmy monster88 dozens of times over many many ski days, they just don't work for me. Love groomers with them, but bumps and off piste they just don't work under my feet. I can't say exactly why but feels like I have trouble with staying in the sweet spot or don't like how they feather an edge. Not quite sure. I don't have this problem with the monsters which are stiff and love in the bumps or any Other ski in my quiver including supernatural 108, hell and back, and influence 115 which are all longer. The monster is nearly the exact same size in all dimensions and stiffer. The 95s I liked even less, not even enjoying the groomers, but could have been a bad tune(but same shop as the ax that I loved)

Just one mans experience, but the moral is: just because you like one stockli, doesn't mean you'll like them all. Even if you really want to like I did.
I will agree with you on the current SR88...they made it too light and feels like they put a rev limiter on it. Personally, I preferred the previous generation better, it had a higher top end yet with more versatility. I saw the new one for next season, there are new graphics, I will check back in here to let you know if the construction has changed.
 
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