Noodler

Back in the game! :)
Skier
Posts
1,625
Location
Denver, CO
I have the tuning gear but not the patience. I take the skis to the hill and while in the back of the truck I pull out the metal American Express card and quickly scrape excess wax then give it maybe two passes with a stiff bristle natural hair brush. Then ski. Skiing takes off wax real well :)
Not in my experience. It's been many years since I've done this, but my recollection is that although skiing does remove wax in just a couple runs, it does so quite unevenly. Patches of wax remained in odd spots here and there and the skis skied a bit unpredictably. Of course this all depends on the snow conditions and weather... and of course the skier's own requirements for their skiing enjoyment.
 

Doug Briggs

Skiing the powder
Industry Insider
Pugski Ski Tester
Posts
4,078
Location
Breckenridge, CO
Not in my experience. It's been many years since I've done this, but my recollection is that although skiing does remove wax in just a couple runs, it does so quite unevenly. Patches of wax remained in odd spots here and there and the skis skied a bit unpredictably. Of course this all depends on the snow conditions and weather... and of course the skier's own requirements for their skiing enjoyment.
I agree, @Noodler . Typically the base near the edges is cleared of wax after a period of time, but a rough, grippy strip of wax remains down the center of the ski.

I feel a test coming on: wax a pair of skis identically, scrape one ski, leave the other unscraped, go skiing.
 
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