Smart Trainer, Peloton, Echelon or?

Decreed_It

I'd rather be skiing
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how extensive are the Peloton training plans? Thinking specifically for sprint and Olympic triathlon and if they lay out the whole plan and workouts for you and let you pick high, medium, or low volume like TrainerRoad?
I don't think there is any customization or training plan development. They have their classes and you pick for yourself. There are some canned programs however. Example would be intro to PZ training - 4 week schedule of specific classes. I've not checked out any of the others except the very basic intro to Peloton and that was maybe 3-5 rides?

For Power Zone there's a separate app/website and a FB group that curates/develops plans and challenges, I'd think that would be the model. Something like a Strava Summit (or whatever premium is called now) training plan that you then execute on the gear by picking the closest workouts to the plan.
 

tball

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Ultimately it comes down to the biggest factors of if you enjoy class based workout and if you find an class/instructor you jive with and able to motivates you.
Thanks. I'm liking the idea of the flexibility to choose between a Peloton class and a similar structured workout on TrainerRoad or Rouvy while watching TV or a movie, depending on my mood. Whatever is more likely to get me to go down in the basement and do any workout is infinitely better than no workout!
 

tball

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PSA, there are 7 Cycleops 300 Pro indoor cycles for sale in Evergreen, CO, asking $475 each:

I've got both a 300 Pro and a 400 Pro. Bought them used for $700 and $800 going back ~10 years. You adjust the resistance of the 300 Pro by turning a knob like a spin bike, while the 400 Pro is a smart bike where the resistance is controlled by the computer.

They are amazing, rock-solid bikes and have a PowerTap power meter built-in. The downside is the compatibility, as they use an ANT protocol that is proprietary. It only plays nicely with Cyclops head units, Rouvy, and the legacy TrainerRoad app (support for which is waning).

I believe you can use the 300 Pro for Peloton workouts with Rouvy free ride (which is free) to track your power zones and log workouts, though I haven't confirmed since I'm using the 400 Pro. From Rouvy you can easily upload the workouts to Garmin or Strava.

I have little doubt the Cycleops indoor bikes are higher quality than a Peloton or any of the new indoor bikes coming out. It's just the lack of compatibility given how old they are that's the problem. Don't think they will ever work with Zwift, for example. But, there are good options with Rouvy and Peloton workouts for the price, as described above. New they sold for $2500-3000. I'm happy to answer any questions...
 
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martyg

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Thanks. I'm liking the idea of the flexibility to choose between a Peloton class and a similar structured workout on TrainerRoad or Rouvy while watching TV or a movie, depending on my mood. Whatever is more likely to get me to go down in the basement and do any workout is infinitely better than no workout!
tball - you likely have awesome resources in your community for performance metabolic testing. That should be your ultimate source of the truth, and it is not expensive.

In my case, the more granular the info, from a super reliable Source of The Truth, the more likely I am to follow it to the letter. IME, being process motivated leads to the desired results - with the caveat that you have to have very accurate info to work with.

We have the Durango Performance Center. You likely have a number of other labs. For $200, I can get on an erg, have my respiratory gases measured, have blood draws, and know exactly how my metabolism is functioning, and how I should be training. For that price, one of the top coaches / physiologists in the country writes a training program for me. In my case, the vast majority of volume is in recovery zones, coupled with about 6% of weekly workout time at high, high intensities.

I use a Stages SC3 bike, and Amazon Prime videos to keep my mind engaged - or surf Pugski. Stages is a brand extension of a factory, that makes many, many of the trainers sold today. Their main channel of distribution of Stages brand is spin gyms. These bikes are made to be ridden 12 hours a day, everyday.

Enjoy!

Performance testing 1 LR.jpg
 
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Thread Starter
TS
coskigirl

coskigirl

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:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:In so many ways, it's funny because it's true.

On another note, I finally did an FTP test yesterday so I can monitor power zones. Yes, I was close to puking at the end. Yes, I know a lot of people can push a lot more power than this but it's where I'm at. I probably won't do any Power Zone training plans for now, just can't reliably get the time on my bike on specific days, but I will start doing some of the PZ rides. I'm happy that Christine, my favorite instructor is doing them now but I'll do some with the others as well.
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