Bill Miles

Old Man Groomer Zoomer
Skier
Posts
385
Location
Hailey, Idaho
Me: 5'11", 210 lb, 72 y.o. advanced skier, prefer groomers (long and steep preferred) in my old age.

Mountains usually skied: Home Mountain Sun Valley. Usually late season trips to Bachelor, Snowbird, Mammoth

Current quiver: Fischer Progessor 950 in 175. Also have an old pair of Rossi Bandit 83's in 180 that I haven't skied in a couple of years.

Issue: My Fischers can handle late season slush or cut up crud from a soft groom, but it wears my old legs out too soon. I realize this is more of a skier issue than a ski issue, but would something else be better for these conditions? Thinking I should try Enorcer 93's. Might stop at Mammoth for a day in July on way to a wedding in Cali and could try to demo, slthough I hate typical demo rates.

Suggestions?
 

ski otter 2

Out on the slopes
Skier
Posts
860
K2 Pinnacle 105.
This is this season's and earlier ski (18/19 and earlier), but it's just so restful in slush - easy on the legs, forgiving -IF base bevel is increased in increments from front contact point forward an inch or so. I also am 72. It's good at speed of your choice. I'm around 150 lbs/5/10" on the 186, second longest.)
 

Rod9301

Out on the slopes
Skier
Posts
1,066
I'm 70, and i prefer a stiff, metal ski, 105+in slush.

I'm on metal katanas and the power thru everything
 

ADKmel

Turning
Skier
Posts
645
Location
Southern Adirondacks NY
RENOUN Endurance (98under foot) or Z-90's Dream skis for Old knees/joints!
I've been on the Liberty 76's they are awesome spring skis too. No chatter, perfect for early morning frozen and worked in spring piles I've been skiing them at Mammoth last 2 days.
 

AngryAnalyst

Getting on the lift
Skier
Posts
299
Really interested in seeing where this ends up - I have no intuition for what would be easy on the legs for slush. I personally like heavy, dull and little camber for slush but those have other issues in terms of knee impact.
 

ScottB

Out on the slopes
Skier
Posts
595
Location
Boston
I am a little bigger than the OP, but he is a fairly big guy. I went through this selection this spring. I found width was key for slush, and I liked light weight better than heavy. The light weight had to be a stiff ski, though, not a noodle. The best performing ski for me was Blizzard Zero G 108, my stiff AT ski. It's a light weight Blizzard Cochise Something like a head Kore 105 would be similar. A Rustler 10 or Pinnacle 105 to.

I skied a enforcer 93 in slush and fought the ski all day, it tired me out. Not enough float to get on top of the slush, so the slush was directing the ski against my inputs all day. I traded skis with someone and couldn't get him off my Zero G's. I skied a Salomon X drive 88 and it was worse than the enforcer. The x drive is a burly ski, so I always win the battle with the snow, but it was work. Once you get wide enough to get on top of the slush, the work goes away. For lighter folks, a narrower ski will work
I also ski a ski Logik Chariot in slush and it floats and is fantastic. It's a heavier ski and is a little more work than my Zero G.
 

James

Skiing the powder
Instructor
Posts
8,949
The Rustler 10 is known for short turns. That's ok at Sun Valley?

Yeah I think some metal could be good. Not a lot of sidecut.
I am a little bigger than the OP, but he is a fairly big guy. I went through this selection this spring. I found width was key for slush, and I liked light weight better than heavy. The light weight had to be a stiff ski, though, not a noodle. The best performing ski for me was Blizzard Zero G 108, my stiff AT ski. It's a light weight Blizzard Cochise Something like a head Kore 105 would be similar. A Rustler 10 or Pinnacle 105 to.

I skied a enforcer 93 in slush and fought the ski all day, it tired me out. Not enough float to get on top of the slush, so the slush was directing the ski against my inputs all day. I traded skis with someone and couldn't get him off my Zero G's. I skied a Salomon X drive 88 and it was worse than the enforcer. The x drive is a burly ski, so I always win the battle with the snow, but it was work. Once you get wide enough to get on top of the slush, the work goes away. For lighter folks, a narrower ski will work
I also ski a ski Logik Chariot in slush and it floats and is fantastic. It's a heavier ski and is a little more work than my Zero G.
What about the Moment Wildcat Tour 108? You loved the Biby/Wildcat? What year do you have?
They also make that in a tour but it's 116mm.
Thinking also the 4front Msp 107.
 

Tekweezle

Booting up
Skier
Posts
15
Location
New Yawk
I would be thinking that a heavy ski with wide shovel but little side cut might work out well on crud/slush. But is that easy on the legs? Actually sounds counter intuitive....
 

AngryAnalyst

Getting on the lift
Skier
Posts
299
What about the Moment Wildcat Tour 108? You loved the Biby/Wildcat? What year do you have?
They also make that in a tour but it's 116mm.
Thinking also the 4front Msp 107.
The Wildcat 108 Tour is ridiculously good. It does everything at least competently and most things very well.

Most surprising, it is fine in hard snow, though it’s not necessarily going to suck you into the turn. Biggest “problem” I’ve had is mild top sheet chipping around the edges.

Other than that they’ve made me seriously reconsider my quiver which I guess is a problem?
 

ScottB

Out on the slopes
Skier
Posts
595
Location
Boston
What about the Moment Wildcat Tour 108? You loved the Biby/Wildcat? What year do you have?
They also make that in a tour but it's 116mm.
My son has the Bibby Pro in 184 cm. Its the 2017 model. I have borrowed it from him a few times and loved it. (although I need the 190cm length for more float in light powder) I have never had it in spring conditions, (slush) but I bet it would be good. Plenty of float and width, plenty stiff. As AngryAnalyst, says he loves his Wildcat 108 Tour. The Bibbly is a bit heavier, but I think it will perform similar. I think the Wildcat Tour is a more playful version of my Zero G. They both have the width to float, the stiffness to not get deflected, and both are light.
 

markojp

mtn rep for the gear on my feet
Industry Insider
Instructor
Posts
3,463
Location
PNW aka SEA
Enforcer 93 or try a K2 Mind Bender 99. The latter is really good in deep mucky corn.
 

AngryAnalyst

Getting on the lift
Skier
Posts
299
My son has the Bibby Pro in 184 cm. Its the 2017 model. I have borrowed it from him a few times and loved it. (although I need the 190cm length for more float in light powder) I have never had it in spring conditions, (slush) but I bet it would be good. Plenty of float and width, plenty stiff. As AngryAnalyst, says he loves his Wildcat 108 Tour. The Bibbly is a bit heavier, but I think it will perform similar. I think the Wildcat Tour is a more playful version of my Zero G. They both have the width to float, the stiffness to not get deflected, and both are light.
One more thing I would say, and keep in mind I may be closer to your sons age than yours, is that I don’t love them in slush but I doubt I’d like the zero g more. I tend to prefer heavy + stiff in slush so I go Billygoat. So, maybe that’s another caveat or maybe I’m just young and can’t guess what will/won’t torque my knees at 60.
 

James

Skiing the powder
Instructor
Posts
8,949
Hah, I go narrow and stiff in slushy corn. Wouldn't recommend for the op though.
The Wildcat 108 Tour is ridiculously good. It does everything at least competently and most things very well.

Most surprising, it is fine in hard snow, though it’s not necessarily going to suck you into the turn. Biggest “problem” I’ve had is mild top sheet chipping around the edges.

Other than that they’ve made me seriously reconsider my quiver which I guess is a problem?
You on the 184 or 190?
Tail rocker on the Wildcat tour 108 and the Zero G 108 is fairly different.

IMG_6520.jpg

Zero G 108. (Blister photo)
IMG_6521.jpg

Wildcat Tour 108
 

AngryAnalyst

Getting on the lift
Skier
Posts
299
You on the 184 or 190?
Tail rocker on the Wildcat tour 108 and the Zero G 108 is fairly different.
Agree the tail is the big point of difference and it's probably sufficient to decide between the two skis. Everything else is second order.

I am debating a second narrower (~95) ski with lighter bindings (MTN lab vs. shift) but I am also tempted by just buying lighter bindings for a second pair of Wildcat 108s. They aren't heavy.

Length: 190. I can't think of why I (6 ft/220) would need the 184. The only time I have ever wished they were shorter was a weird situation with an actual line of people on a moderate slope with tight walls that kept me from getting my skis fully sideways (if that makes you guess I slid into the next person in line you would be right).
 
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