ski day pocket food

Discussion in 'General Skiing' started by SSSdave, Nov 4, 2019.

  1. SSSdave

    SSSdave life is short precious ...don't waste it Skier

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2017
    Posts:
    718
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    As we still wait for white flakes...

    The topic of this thread is food on ski days for those frugal among us that avoid eating at pricy resort cafeterias, lodges, and restaurants. Yes we that brown bag, tailgate, eat out of food brought in our cars, or carried in our coat pockets. Not always convenient if one's vehicle is parked at a remote resort lot at the base or one took public transportation to the resort. Of course one can rent a locker for $10 or so that I also tend to avoid if all I need to store is some food that otherwise is a wee too bulky for my coat pockets that already has too much stuff.

    So what does this person do? Well a small candy bar, energy drink, or nutrition bar if that is all, can easily find a pocket to fit in, however a plastic packaged sandwich from a market among others things like an energy drink bottle do not. So herein am admitting my misdemeanors. I hide such things out in snowy woods areas on ski slopes. Something a resort would denounce but over many years doing such, have never had a problem. Obviously might be an issue if numbers of others began doing same. As someone occasionally going into such woodsy places for skiing and taking breaks, I'm pretty much an expert at such spots at the 2 resorts I frequent. Very easy on first runs down, to hide a Ziplock bag with a little food under snow beside a tree where others are never going to track. Someone might wonder if animals might get at the food but my experience is that has never happened to this person and is probably because it is easy to cover with snow. Even if it hasn't snowed for a couple weeks, snow just below a firm crust is usually loose unless it is late season.

    Another issue is what to do with packaging after eating whatever? Well one could of course just carry wrappers in a pocket the rest of a ski day though I rarely do so and instead at the 2 resorts I frequent, there are always trash containers down at lift mazes.

    So what kind of food? Well as a lightweight, I more often bring a store bought sandwich, or yogurt, or nutrition bar, and or candy. These days, the only food I actually carry in my pocket all day tends to be a Momma Chia, Chia Squeeze drink as I stash the rest. This winter I've got a more expensive food habit that has developed the last couple summers that I expect to add to my pocket. I began bringing hard aged Gouda cheese on my summer backpacking trips because it keeps well for extended periods of days without refrigeration and has a wonderful rich cheese flavor. In fact such cheese was developed before our current modern era because European people could carry it with them.
     
    Lilia likes this.
  2. Decreed_It

    Decreed_It I'd rather be skiing Skier

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Posts:
    271
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    Sounds like a man after my own heart. You got the cardinal rules down, pack it in, pack it out - hard cheeses (I love to add bison or venison jerky or a dry sausage), and classic pb&J's made at breakfast. Fruit is easy but best left in the 'stash'. We always stash something on short section hikes on the AT for the 1st night, usually frozen steaks, and beers :), for an epic camp dinner. And yeah all that trash comes with us the next couple of days.

    I used to be into power bars and cliffs and all that but my guts don't like it, plain old food is best for me. If we're staying at the mountain or in a nearby town then it's big breakfast and not much of anything again until dinner time. Sometimes that pb&j packed at breakfast. Sometimes we splurge on the mountain. Something for everyone!
     
    SSSdave likes this.
  3. oldfashoned

    oldfashoned Getting off the lift Skier

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2016
    Posts:
    252
    If i'm staying at a motel without comp breakfast I use this and English muffins: https://www.amazon.com/Chef-Buddy-8...rowave+egg+poacher&qid=1572923498&sr=8-9&th=1
    Yes you need to bring the eggs and whatnot in a cooler for the commute up, however the small cooler I pack with sandwiches and bring to the resort and carry it up the lift (at Alpine) or Funi (Squaw) and stash is somewhere. Also have carried the lunch in pockets but getting tired of that. Bagels seem to work best if going that route. Cliff bars and Bananas work for a light lunch and a great incentive not to fall! I have been packing those 1/2 size water bottles, but looking for an alternative. I did try a Camelbak this past spring with good results, but I'm sold on this solution as a standard. Maybe I need to fill it up with something other than water? :rocks::cocktail::mojito:@mendieta and ideas??
     
  4. Josh Matta

    Josh Matta Making fresh tracks Instructor

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Posts:
    3,873
    DoryBreaux, VickiK, Bruuuce and 3 others like this.
  5. slowrider

    slowrider Making fresh tracks Skier

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2015
    Posts:
    1,609
    Dried fruit and Halloween candy
     


  6. Beartown

    Beartown Chasing the dragon Skier

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2017
    Posts:
    233
    backpack. ham sandwich in low-profile tupperware thingy. boom.

    60CD07BF-3BDA-4E7A-94D2-9648F555AFEA_4_5005_c.jpeg
     
  7. dbostedo

    dbostedo Asst. Gathermeister-- Jackson Hole 2020 Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Posts:
    4,055
    Location:
    Northern Virginia, USA
    A nice hot plastic bag of poutine could keep you warm too!
     
  8. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    3,946
    Location:
    NYC
    Just don't fall on it and burst the package.
    Not a good visual.
     
    TexasStout and dbostedo like this.
  9. geepers

    geepers Out on the slopes Skier

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Posts:
    926
    Location:
    Australia
    How about a Vegemite sandwich?
     
  10. dbostedo

    dbostedo Asst. Gathermeister-- Jackson Hole 2020 Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Posts:
    4,055
    Location:
    Northern Virginia, USA
    You said the magic words!

     
    Ogg, Cameron, geepers and 2 others like this.
  11. Erik Timmerman

    Erik Timmerman Making fresh tracks Instructor

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    3,433
    Swedish Fish have everything a growing boy needs.
     
  12. Guy in Shorts

    Guy in Shorts Tree Psycho Skier

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2016
    Posts:
    1,217
    Location:
    Killington
    The tailgate with beer and food is always only one run away. Playing pack mule seems as silly as playing camel unless you are in the backcountry.
     
  13. Scruffy

    Scruffy Out on the slopes Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    Posts:
    671
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    I think that may depend on where you ski, GIS. Killington is easy to get an early parking spot and ski to car/truck. Jackson Hole, Squaw? Not so much. Even Alta is hard to plan on an early arrival due to road and traffic issues.

    Back on topic: The funniest thing I've seen pocket food wise was a cooked Pork Chop. Friend on mine was on the Atkin's diet years ago and on the lift whipped out a plastic ziplock bag with a cooked pork chop.
     
    Lilia, blackke17 and Decreed_It like this.
  14. tch

    tch What do I know; I'm just some guy on the internet. Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2015
    Posts:
    489
    Location:
    New England
    I've moved on to eating my own food in a lodge b/c as I get older I need a warm-up and a rest, but for years I packed a tuna fish sandwich and some brownies in my chest pocket. They're soft and actually respond well to pressure; the sandwich actually gets easier to eat the more it's been smooshed together.
     
  15. crgildart

    crgildart Gravity Slave Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    6,410
    Location:
    The Bull City
    Ski in/ski out slopeside lodging FTW.. Ski School locker room or patrol shack is also WINNING!
     
    Cameron, Carolinacub and Beartown like this.
  16. DoryBreaux

    DoryBreaux Friend for Hire on Powder Days Industry Insider Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2015
    Posts:
    666
    Location:
    Having more fun than you
    I always smushed my tuna sandwiches, even at home, when I was a little kid. Something satisfying about it.

    I rarely pack a lunch on freeski days unless I'm not at a resort. Work days sometimes I do, sometimes I don't.
     
  17. blackke17

    blackke17 I'd rather be at Alta Skier

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2017
    Posts:
    314
    Location:
    Little Cottonwood Canyon, Utah
    90% of my ski lunches look like this IMG_2089.JPG
     
    Lilia, Cameron, Guy in Shorts and 3 others like this.
  18. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,994
    Location:
    Reno
    I've started taking these along on hunts or hiking and as a mid-morning pick-me-up when I was working at a mine this past summer. They are, like other bars, very dense and I don't feel the need to eat it all at once. There's no chocolate or other stuff to melt and make a mess in your pocket. Simple and pretty tasty. They do have some other flavors but I haven't had them yet. Best of all they're easy to grab and go.
    bar.jpg
     
  19. Seldomski

    Seldomski Paralysis by analysis Skier

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2017
    Posts:
    868
    I don't ski enough for the cost of lunch to be a major factor in the overall expense. Big breakfast, then granola bar eaten on the slopes if conditions are awesome. That way I get more ski time if snow is great. If conditions are "meh," I eat *gasp* on mountain soup/chili or whatever is high calorie per $$. I'll take it easy and soak in the ambiance in the lodge.
     
    TexasStout likes this.
  20. Pat AKA mustski

    Pat AKA mustski Making fresh tracks Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Posts:
    1,544
    Location:
    Big Bear, California
    We eat breakfast and then ski straight through until late lunch time - 2ish and call it a day. Locally, we quit earlier because the conditions in SoCal generally deteriorate by then. At most resorts, light is starting to get flat around 2:00 and, truthfully, we are tired and ready for après. The exceptions are when we are skiing with friends and meet up for lunch for the social part of the day. On those days, we just buy lunch.
     
    MattSmith likes this.

Share This Page


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice