Individual Review Preview: 2019 DPS Foundation Cassiar 87

Discussion in 'Gear Reviews and Comparisons' started by Philpug, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. Philpug

    Philpug Enjoying being back on two skis. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    It is always cool to be there at the beginning. DPS launched its Foundation series right when we started Pugski.com, and DPS was one of our first sponsors. Two years later, DPS is updating the series we helped launch by giving the Cassiar collection a new shape and a new model, the Foundation Cassiar 87. While the Chassis 2 shape is shared with the Powderworks 87, this is an all-new construction in the Foundation application.

    IMG_0023.JPG
    Testing Foundation Cassiar 87 Prototypes at Snowbird
    This past spring we got the chance to spend some time with Stephan Drake testing the final round of the Foundation Cassiar 87 prototypes at Snowbird. He had four versions of the ski all with different flex patterns. Well, let me clarify: not different flex patterns in the whole ski, just the middle third of the ski from the center of the ski back. This is the type of attention that Stephan puts into his skis; no small measure is left to chance.

    IMG_1608.jpg
    Visual impressions: DPS is staying with its gradient graphic and went with a red-into-silver fade for the Cassiar 87. As I said in initial reviews of the Foundations, it is very hard to do a proper gradient fade, but DPS nails it with these classic colors. The Cassiar’s Chassis 2 shape is all new for the Foundation with its more direct tip and tail shape: the tip has a more gradual rise with less flare, and the tail also has a straighter sidecut with more taper. Just looking at the design, it looks like it would be more GS in feel, but this wasn't the case once I got it on snow, even in the 185cm version. The new shape reacts very quickly with its 87mm waist.

    IMG_1607.jpg
    On the snow: I like when a ski belies its dimensions. As I said above, with less flare in the tip and the taper in the tail, even though it looks like the Cassiar 87 would just release when pressured and not hold, the new construction does hold just as long as you ask it to. However, if you want to feather the tail and release it, it does so with ease.

    Early-season terrain options have been limited here in Tahoe, but Mt Rose has really held up well, allowing us to test these in varied terrain and snow types and from zoomer groomers to nice chalky bumps both on trail and in the trees. The Cassiar 87 handled everything we have thrown at it, and quite frankly with much more gumption than I expected. Where the outgoing series of Cassiars were nice lightweight alternatives in their categories, these new Chassis 2s are much stronger and more composed. They might not have metal in them, but do not let that sway you from considering them; these have some solid dampening and are very smooth on the snow.

    Availability: Although these are 2018-19 models, DPS does have some in stock for early delivery. If you want to be the first on your block to get on these, you can contact your local DPS dealer like @SkiEssentials or @skifotm and they can order the ski now; you can also contact DPS directly.

    Stay tuned for additional reviews from some of our testers along with my continued updates. We will have these in Tahoe for reviews and a pair will be send soon to our Colorado testers.
    • Who is it for? Skiers who want an entry-level premium ski without entry-level performance.
    • Who is it not for? Stronger skiers can overpower their regular sizes, so think about sizing up.
    • Insider tip: Look for the upcoming Uschi 87 and a junior version from this mold: the Wailer Grom available with a scaled-down construction and flex pattern in 148 and 158 lengths.
    • Other skis in class: Blizzard Brahma, Dynastar Legend X88, Kästle LX85, Stöckli SR88, Völkl Kendo.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 4, 2018
  2. Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    The Cassiar 87 has a sister, the Uschi 87, which I've had the pleasure of skiing a fair bit this season. Fresh snow days have been few and far between, and the terrain and conditions have been varied, to say the least, ranging from scraped-off groomers to wind-buffed chalky snow. At times like this, it's good to have such a ski in your quiver, one that will confidently hold an edge and make you want to explore off piste, even when it hasn't snowed in a while.

    Even though the all-new 87 appears to be geared toward the off-piste adventurer, don't let that fool you. For instance, a single day at Squaw served up small chalky moguls below Mainline and extremely firm groomers and big bumps on Granite. The Uschi 87 did it all and made me want to stay out for more.
    • Who is it for? Skiers who want a supple ski for a variety of conditions.
    • Who is it not for? Strong skiers who power into every turn.
    • Insider tip: Don't be afraid to go up a size
    • Other skis in class: Blizzard Black Pearl 88, Dynastar Legend W88, Head Wild Joy.
     
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  3. Eric Edelstein

    Eric Edelstein ExoticSkis Industry Insider

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    We're planning to get some formal review time on the production versions of the Cassiar 82 and 87 in the newest Foundation builds this season here on the East coast, so stay tuned for a comparison of observations! I personally found last year's Foundation models a bit too weak and lightweight when skied at pressure levels above intermediate intensity, and lacked the security underfoot on hard surfaces we had come to expect from DPS's carving frontside designs in the past. The Foundation skis definitely found a place in the moderate price range DPS needs to target and felt easy and friendly in packed powder conditions with a great turn shape geometry and camber profile, but (...in my opinion...) felt out-of-place and unhappy when asked to support athletic turns on hard surfaces or traverse cruddy surfaces. If Phil's observation of the new Chassis 2 being stronger and more composed than the previous versions shows up in the production models we hope to review, we will be happy campers!
     
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  4. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

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    So, I've had a few days on DPS's new for '18-'19 Foundation Cassiar 87 in 185cm length. And the verdict is...

    But first, a little about the driver. I am 53, 5'10" and around 230ish before gear (gravity is my friend on those long, low angle traverses against the wind!). I've skied for many years but took several off until last year. Things changed quite a bit in ski technology and shape while I was gone. Frankly, that's a really good thing! I'm an advancing advanced skier with a preference to groomers. I tend to get tentative on occasion and also get in the back seat still, so I need a ski that will forgive my transgressions. I have tended to stay out of moguls and trees in the past but I'm working on that. I took these skis down some crusty moguls, some chalk moguls, and through the trees where it was everything from dust on crust to a few inches of left over fresh from 4 or 5 days ago. I'll leave the "what other ski is it like" to those who have much more insight on that subject.

    The ski: 2018-19 DPS Foundation Cassiar 87, 185cm
    The boot: Technica Cochise 130
    The binding: Tyrolia Aaatack 13 demo, 7 setting
    The conditions: varied, hero groomers, hard bumps, scraped off hardpack, dust on crust, chalk in the trees, shark fins, chocolate chips

    I've been fortunate to ski both the '18-'19 Foundation Cassiar 82 in 178cm and the '17-'18 Foundation Cassiar 95 in 185cm (the '18-'19 Cassiar 95 will be slimmed down to 94 with a shape similar to the '18-'19 87 and 82). I liked both of those skis but I think if I had to choose one, I'd pick the 87 over its narrower and wider brethren. It hits the sweet spot without giving up much to the 82's carving and the 95's stable, more all-mountain feel. I found the ski will carve as far over as I can go but the rounded tail allows for a quick detach from a carve to a slarve or slide if the situation calls for it. Give the ski a bit more angle and you're back on the carve. In the trees and bumps that same tail shape, along with a little rise in the forebody, allows for a safe, secure feel for those who are learning the literal ins and outs of bumps and trees. I didn't feel the ski was offended by my weight; it never felt whimpy or nervous. A strong, lighter skier would probably enjoy the 185 length. Lighter or less experienced skiers would do well with the 178 or 170cm lengths (I believe that is what the other two lengths are). The 82 that I skied is 178cm and felt a little less composed; I've no doubt that a longer length would fix that for me.

    The ski does not demand full attention at all times but it will reward the more technically proficient skier who drives harder. It will also not punish the intermediate skier who is climbing the skill ladder. The 87s would make a really good one ski quiver for the Tahoe/Sierra skier or a fine addition to a two ski all-mountain quiver with a 100+ for those sweet, sweet powder days. With the shape of the tip mimicking DPS's very popular Wailer lineup, I'd believe these would do quite well in fresh up to 6 or 8". Unfortunately, I haven't had the chance to try that yet!

    • Who is it for? Advancing intermediates or experts looking for a comfortable, competent, everyday driver that doesn't punish mistakes but rewards proficiency.
    • Who is it not for? Beginners or early intermediates who are still feeling their way around the mountain.
    • Insider tip? Take these skis to areas that may normally be out of your comfort zone; they will help you without a lot of drama.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2017
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  5. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

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    UPDATE: Mother Nature came through with about 4" of fresh powder last night, along with some wicked winds, at Mt. Rose. Conditions ranged from totally scraped/blown off frozen cord to stashes of 12" in the trees. As I noted above in my initial report I usually tend to stay away from trees and bumps. Today was a tree day and, boy, what fun I had! The 87's had plenty of float for the powder at hand. They also handled the transitions from poof to chopped up to scrape with no problems or excitement. I never felt like the ski was trying to get the best of me and there were plenty of chances, mostly my fault.

    I skied lines that I would not have considered even last week and felt pretty good about my choices. The skis were easy to turn either by carve or just pushing the tails around. Quick adjustments were the name of the game in some spots where soft snow transitioned to exposed granite. No problem! DPS has really hit a sweet spot with this shape and width.
     


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    Philpug

    Philpug Enjoying being back on two skis. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    I think you will really like these. Stronger skiers could easily overpower the first generation of these skis but now we are skiing a much stronger but as you can tell by @Andy Mink's "Intermediate" testing of it, DPS was able to keep that easiness but expanded the apeal to stronger skiers. We have seen that from early feedback from our testers on other Chassis 2 skis.
     
  7. Alexzn

    Alexzn Ski Squaw Skier

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    We got to test the 165 length of this ski over the past few days. The primary tester was my daughter, my wife also got a day on the ski as well. My daughter is 5'4", 120 lb, and a (now) former competitive junior freerider, so for as small woman she rips and her daily ski is Savory 7 in 170 length. She absolutely loved the ski on the groomers, and said that they are a fantastic carver with the nice turn that felt nearly automatic. She liked them off piste as well, but at speeds she skis them (very fast...), they felt a bit soft. Notably, she didn't complain about them being chattery or nervous, so DPS Foundation construction is indeed solid.

    My wife's impression were also very positive, she compared them to a smooth mellow Lexus-like ski relative to her more high-octane BMW-like Kastles. She also commented that the ski felt softer than her Kastles (again no surprise). I think the family consensus was that it was a great option for a mellow skier who does not necessarily want to push the ski to a red line, but needs a reliable and still easy ski for a great day on the slopes.

    Some comments from me after being on other Cassiar 2s:: DPS nailed the tip shape on those skis, they say you cannot buy a turn, maybe with these skis you just can. The turn is neutral, and yet effortless. It is still feels like an intermediate level ski, but unlike the previous Foundation skis, this one has a higher top end and with this shape there is also not much penalty for upsizing. This collection is particularly suitable for lighter skiers and for skiers who don't put the pedal to the metal every time they point their skis downhill. Well done, DPS.
     
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    Philpug

    Philpug Enjoying being back on two skis. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    Yes, the all new "sdp skis" do rip ;). While riding the lift someone asked me about my "sdp" skis and wanted to know if they were really good because he has been seeing a lot of them on the hill. I did have to hold my chuckle back and tell him they they are the real deal.
     
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  9. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

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    Maybe they should put the logo across the width instead of along the length.
     
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    Philpug

    Philpug Enjoying being back on two skis. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    Conditions in Tahoe have been far from stellar but adversity will either confirm character or expose weaknesses. The new Foundation Cassiar shape is leaps above the first-generation Foundations and now have the premium feel that you expect with a $799 price tag. One of the things that is impressive with the new Cassiars is the finish of the skis. I mentioned the visual topskin gradient graphics earlier, but the base finishes were more consistent than most early-run skis we have received. Since most of the test skis we received were low-single-digit serial numbers, with one pair being 00, I brought them to @smoothrides to have him check them; of the 8 pairs I had, only one was off from the 1/2* expected and that ski was between a .5 and .7 on the base, not too bad when I have received bases from major brands being up to 3* base bevels. All the bases were flat, and DPS does a very nice chevron base structure.
     
  11. laine

    laine I ski like a girl. Fast. Skier

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    @Alexzn - what Kastles is your wife on? I'm in the market for a low/mid-80s ski and am doing some comparisons. The Kastle MX84 is on my test list.
     
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    Philpug

    Philpug Enjoying being back on two skis. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    She is on a MX(BMX)98
     
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  13. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

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    I noticed the finish is pretty tough. Two pair got run over at one time by one person and other than a nick and a little chip they came out well. The grainy finish hides scratches well and is quite resilient.
     
  14. Drahtguy Kevin

    Drahtguy Kevin Après aficionado Pugski Ski Tester

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    The DPS Foundation Cassiar 87 has made it’s way to Colorado. The timing is perfect as we were blessed with a fair amount of snow last week; and Loveland is skiing excellent. I’m 6’2” and 215 pounds and spent Wednesday skiing fast and aggressively on the 87. Here are some early impressions.

    DPS does a tremendous job building eye-catching skis. As mentioned above, the fade and bases of these skis are outstanding. The ride matches their appearance. I ran a couple of familiar groomers to get a feel for the ski. The even flex and ease into and out of turns is remarkable and confidence inspiring. The 87 dug deep in the hero snow and held firm until I said when. The ski handles speed well but does have a top end that was a tad higher than I expected for a ski without metal. At my size, I’d like more stiffness and a better bite out of the tail on groomers. I was eager to get theses skis off the groomed to see what fun was lurking off piste.

    The 87 is pure money in moguls of various sizes and shapes. The tip, flex and the easy tail inspired me to push my skills. Oh, what a joy. Venturing into the trees produced grins for the same reasons. This ski reacts enthusiastically to input but doesn’t demand full attention at all times. I found a few 8-10” powder stashes that theses skis just ate up. I was amazed at the way the 87 handled the soft, deep crude and wind buffed slabby crap in the South Chutes. The versatile nature of this ski allowed me to put ‘em on edge and slice or flatten them out and surf. I was amazed and delighted.

    Advancing intermediates and above will find a trusted friend who will inspire them to seek out unfamiliar areas of the mountain once thought out of their league.

    DPS has put their time in designing, testing and listening. Their narrower offerings get better with each tweak. I will spend more days on the Foundation Cassiar 87.
     
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  15. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

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    Seems we skied the same ski! I am looking to get some more turns on these babies.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2018
  16. Eric Edelstein

    Eric Edelstein ExoticSkis Industry Insider

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 82 and 87 (2018-2019)

    124-82-107 r=15m @ 178cm
    122-87-109 r=18m @ 184cm
    [​IMG]


    Manufacturer Info:

    [​IMG]

    DPS Skis
    2640 West California Ave
    Salt Lake City, UT 84104
    Telephone: [​IMG]+1.801.413.1737

    http://www.DPSSkis.com

    Suggested Retail Price (MSRP):

    $799 usd

    Usage Class:

    Frontside recreational carvers

    Rating (with comments):
    (1="get me off these things"->10="I have to own a pair")

    9 - Packed powder, non-boilerplate surfaces at low to moderate speeds
    6-7 - Boilerplate and high speeds or high-pressure techniques
    7-8 - Mixed surfaces (with speed limit)
    7 - Powder (light feel, narrow & directional)

    Background:

    Stephan Drake’s DPS has been a pioneer in premium quality powder ski shaping, materials science and construction since 2005. The last few years have seen DPS branch out into new markets for all-mountain designs and specialty carving skis, tweaking the layups, geometries, sidecuts and flex patterns each season in a search for a frontside ski to develop a cult following enjoyed by their powder skis. These are DPS's second-iteration of their more affordable "Foundation" construction series utilizing bamboo cores, triaxial fiberglass and carbon stringers rather than the more expensive full-sheet carbon prepeg laminates on a poplar core built into in their Alchemist series. The price difference is significant ($799 vs. $1299 +- usd), and the Foundation skis are targeted at a more mainstream, midrange customer than their traditionally high-end, fanatical ski enthusiasts who covet the full-carbon layups of DPS's premium level skis. These v2.0 Foundation skis have evolved to have better performance on harder surfaces and higher-pressure situations than the v1.0 Foundations, yet retain their very lightweight feel underfoot and affordability for a wide range of skiers. Shape geometries, flex patterns and camber profilles have also been refined in these v2.0 Foundation skis to deliver an update to DPS's unique turn behavior and feel on-snow.

    Manufacturer's Description:

    CF87:
    "At the center of the new Cassiar family offering is the 87mm edition. A perfect choice for everyday resort use where you are 50 percent off-piste and 50 percent on-piste. The Cassiar 87 carries all the performance and refinement DNA of a C2 ski. This Foundation choice will feel damper and smoother than the Alchemist version, and a bit less reactive and energetic."

    CF82:
    In the year 2000, 82mm underfoot was an ultra-wide powder ski. These days, it’s at the narrow end of the spectrum. That said, 82mm underfoot is still an amazing place for all-mountain excellence. Great piste performance, with just enough flotation to make mixed snow a great pleasure. The Foundation choice will feel damper, smoother, and more forgiving than the Alchemist, yet also less reactive and energetic. C2 chassis."

    - Website 2018

    Technical Ski Data:

    • Bamboo/poplar core
    • Triaxial fiberglass
    • Full-length carbon stringer down the center of the core
    • Austrian, die-cut racing bases
    • HRC 48 full-wrap edges
    • UHMW sidewalls
    • Textured polyamide topsheet
    • Measured Weight:
      1864g and 1863g (CF87)
      1707g and 1693g (CF82)

    [​IMG]

    DPS Foundation construction diagram (2018-2019)


    Bindings, Boots & Wax Used:

    Tyrolia PowerRail PRD 12 adjustable bindings
    Salomon S-Max 120 boots.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Pre-Skiing Impression:

    While positioned as their moderately-priced lineup, the Foundation series from DPS (both the CF82 and CF87 we tested) is superbly finished and demonstrates a very high quality of construction and final prep before being shrink-wrapped. The fit and finish is excellent and represents a reference standard for small ski companies around the World. The rich and vibrant cut-resistant textured topsheet is expertly applied in a semi-cap wrap to the sidewalls where edge and base mating is beautifully executed and finished. Bases came straight from the factory with a nice base grind pattern and an above-average edge tune, making them wax-and-go ready out of the wrapper. DPS takes pride in its product, and the attention to detail in the ski’s final appearance and construction finish shows their passion. The Pantone gradient color schemes are simple, yet handsome and show great rack-appeal when seen on a retailer’s show wall.

    The flex is moderate throughout the shovel, midbody and tail section with nicely rounded arc on both the CF82 and CF87. They feel light (1864 and 1863 grams each for the CF87 and 1707g and 1693g for the CF82) and respond with a lively rebound. They look and feel like a high-quality product. Torsional resistance feels moderate. Shaping of the sidecut looks like they would execute smooth arcs since there are no abrupt shape transitions anywhere along the ski’s length.

    Test Conditions:

    Eastern corduroy, packed powder and hardpack groomers & boilerplate., shin deep to knee-deep cold powder conditions.

    Summary:

    The DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 (CF87) and Cassiar Founation 82 (CF82) are recreational frontside carvers (not a race carvers) which feels like they're targeted at the weekend warrior or vacation skier who loves freshly groomed packed powder surfaces and prefers to carve precise, carefully executed, elegant arcs with a light-feeling ski but doesn’t ski at ticket-pulling warp 9 speeds or venture out onto impermeable boilerplate surfaces. Both the CF87 and CF82 deliver an elegantly-shaped set of carved turns into packed powder surfaces with very little effort and zero resistance with their refined geometry and flex pattern in a very lightweight chassis, and deliver very quick edge-to-edge response, but they have some limitations. They prefer a packed powder surface, delivering a silky ride and intuitive carved turn sequence on auto-pilot with remarkably low effort, but lose their composure and grip on boilerplate surfaces where they can feel skittery and unattached at speed. The CF82 and CF87 thrive in their element of groomers with packed powder surfaces, with the CF87 having more offf-piste prowess and versatility. Both struggle when taken out of their element, but thrive superbly in their native habitat.

    We found this same behavior in the original Foundation series last season, but DPS has brought this new generation of Foundations up several notches in hard snow tolerance, which means they’re on the right track. The other limitation of the CF82 and CF87 are their failure to withstand high-pressure carving situations a technical expert or ex-racer might apply to the ski. Under such high-pressure conditions, these wonderfully lightweight skis will wash-away or fold under duress. The CF82 and CF87 make wonderfully elegant and quickly responsive turns in their distinctively lightweight chassis primarily suitable for packed powder conditions on the frontside of a resort…..which might be exactly what DPS was shooting for. In contrast, the premium-priced Alchemist Cassiars show excellent hardpack grip and power handling under pressure in their configurations to keep experts happy, so we know DPS can deliver on the promise of excellent frontside skis...but might have made the Foundation Cassiars a bit too compliant and easy-handling to deliver the performance needed to capture the width of the market segment they need to be successful in that niche.

    Hardpack and Boilerplate:

    The CF87 and CF82 share the same behavioral trait: As long as the surface is softly packed or densely packed snow, they hook up on their carving trajectories with very little effort and execute some elegantly-shaped turns as if on auto-pilot. As soon as you get them onto a boilerplate surface (the kind you can’t really get your ski pole into to stand up on its own), they feel skittery and unattached. Ice is even more skittery underfoot, even with a fresh grind and tune on the skis. These ski crave those early morning surfaces of squeeky-dry manmade snow or freshly groomed packed powder...essentially those surfaces you can’t hear underfoot. If you can hear the surface, the CFs will be a bit skittery. If things are silent underfoot, you get a great recreational technical carver as long as you don’t overpower it or get it outside its speed comfort zone.

    Mixed Surface & Variable Conditions:

    Since the CFs are shaped like carving skis and host the camber profile of a carving ski, they're not a surfy funhouse ride in 3D snow conditions, but is instead directional tools of high precision with a nicely compliant personality and refreshingly lightweight feel when navigating mixed surface types. The responsive body and light weight means you can quickly dance your way through mixed conditions without much effort, as long as you don’t expect a rockered font end to give you a surfy feel or a large surface area underfoot to give you floating feeling. You can ski the CFs all day in all kinds of surfaces without much effort....just be aware you’re on a relatively narrow all-mountain carving ski and not a surfy, loose rockered twin tip.

    Bumpy conditions reveal the tail of both skis have some pop and snap to them once flexed and released, making bumpy terrain a sporty event as long as you realize the tail is flat and might grab you a few times if you get lazy. The rouned tail shaping reduces the grabby hooking of the relatively flat tail to a minimum. The light weight and high level of agility of the CFs make them pretty fun in the bumps. We liked the playful feel and ability to be quick-quick-quick on demand while delivering a very accurate ride when it counts. The CF82 is especially quick and light on its feet....much more than its dimensions would indicate.

    Powder Conditions:

    Powder conditions were actually pretty fun on the CFs (more so on the CF87), despite their carving-ski nature. It’s not a surfy ride, but when the snow gets fluffy and deep enough to go up and down in, the CFs are easy handling, never balky or difficult like some frontside carvers, so you could take them out on those “wow, we got fresh snow overnight” mornings an have a good time. Be aware they will sink underfoot if you pressure them too much, so think light and they are easy to ride in 3D snow. They don’t smear in powder they way a rockered ski does, so don’t get lazy. Be directional in your trajectory in powder snow and they will work pretty well. The combination of moderate flex stiffness and light weight makes them cope with deeper snow pretty well, but if you’re serious, you’ll leave these skis behind on new-snow mornings and grab something else to surf with....like the Cassiar 95 or 106.

    Turn Initiation, Apex & Finish:

    DPS’s team of shapers has learned a lot creating cult-like followings for its best-selling powder skis such as the Lotus 124 / 138 and Wailer 112. Their geometry specs deliver a beautifully silky turn sequence in both the CF82 and CF87, with the CF82 being the SL turner and the CF87 being the longer-radius ride, yet still very quick edge to edge. It their element of packed powder surfaces or freshly-blown man made snow, the CFs will initiate a turn with zero effort. Just roll the ski slightly over and apply your weight (no need to pressure the ski by force) and it will pull the forebody into the turn, bringing the skis across your line of travel where you can weight the midbody and tail to finish your turn into a roll of the ski in the opposite direction where the process starts all over again. On the right surface, the CF82 and CF87 are a fine writing instruments laying down a calligraphy of turns into the snow with very little effort.

    These would be the skis for those instructors or technical demo types who want to show what a carved turn looks like at low to moderate speeds in front of some students. The shaping and interaction with the camber profile are the stars of this design. DPS knows how skis interact with the snow, and the CF82 and CF87 are great examples of how a ski can behave in the right conditions. You can modify your arc mid-turn, and you can scrub them sideways when needed, so you’re not under duress to only make one kind of turn the whole way down the hill. These skis can be ridden along their entire length in GS-style (even on the CF82), or make quicker, shorter turns underfoot without burdening the pilot. You can also ride them through their arc and pressure the tails to get a nice boost into the next turn. They love rolling their turns right and left in constant arcs at moderate speeds most likely found on 89 percent of groomed runs around nearly any resort. If I was going to teach an intermediate to make carved turns and bring them to the next level on friendly surfaces, the DPS Cassiar Foundation 82 and 87 might be a great choice as their next ski.

    Builder’s Mount Position:

    We mounted our Tyrolia PowerRail PRD12 test bindings on the manufacturer’s mark. We played with the position in a variety of different conditions, and always seemed to come back to the factory mark unless we were making lots of higher-speed, gs-like runs where moving the bindings back 1cm worked pretty well.

    Analogies: ("This ski is like...")

    A fine calligraphy pen making elegant strokes on high-quality paper. If you use it on paper it wasn’t designed for, you get less than optimal results. Match the pen to the right kind of paper.

    Notable Tester Comments:

    “The lack of mass made them feel loose and unattached at higher speeds”
    “I expected better grip on glossy surfaces, but they washed away when pressured.”
    “Silky smooth-as-buttah, no-effort carving turns on the freshly blown man made surfaces.”
    “Worked nicely until I exceeded their speed limit...then they felt disheveled”

    Quick Comments:

    • Feels lighter than they measure.
    • Quicker edge-to-edge than you expect.
    • Elegant turn shapes on the right snow - automatic turn feed-in and finish
    • Skittery on boilerplate, loose and unsettled.
    • Smooth, smooth, smooth carving transitions, just don't overpower them.
    • Ski them all-day, no effort required.

    Things I Would Change About This Ski:

    Add a bit more mass or perhaps a bit more torsional rigidity to the ski to improve grip on hard surfaces. People could tolerate a slightly more demanding ski to get better hardpack performance. It could be as simple as adding a bit of metal to the ski similar to the original Cassiar 85 Hybrid which we loved...while keeping the cost down.

    Short Answer When Someone Asks "What Do You Think About This Ski?":

    A recreational carver with a silky shape to its turns and feathery feel underfoot, ideal for packed powder groomers at low to moderate speeds, but isn’t for boilerplate days or ex-racer pressure levels. Very high quality construction and finish.

    What kind of skier is this ski good for and not suitable for?

    The ideal skier for the CF82 and CF87 is an advancing intermediate or low-pressure technical carving skier or instructor looking for a lightweight, zero-effort smooth carver for packed powder groomers. Ex-racers, higher-pressure athletic experts and go-fast types will be better off on the Alchemist layup version of the Cassiar lineup. (We loved the Alchemist construction Cassiars we tested for a few runs in February).

    Advice To People Considering This Ski:

    Demo this ski in conditions you are most likely to encounter in your travels, and be aware it doesn’t like boilerplate, icy conditions or higher speeds as much as other options on the market. This ski could bring your carving up a notch if you need something very light and don’t mind the tradeoffs for a heavier and more demanding ski which would grip icy surfaces better and be more composed at high speeds.

    Other Reviews:

    PugSki:
    https://www.pugski.com/threads/preview-2019-dps-foundation-cassiar-87.7560/

    Pics: (click for larger versions)


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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 82 (left) and 87 (right)

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 (left) and 82 (right)

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 82 (left) and 87 (right)

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 82

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 82 Topsheet Texture

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 82 Sidewall / Topsheet Cap

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation Tail Assembly

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 Die-cut Base (tip)

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 82

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 Tail Topsheet Chipping

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 Tip (Full-wrap edge)

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 Camber At Midbody

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 Tip Profile

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 Camber At Midbody

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    DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 Tail Profile

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    Comparison of Northland 178 (left - 13m radius), DPS Cassiar Foundation 87 (center - 18m radius) and DPS Cassiar Foundation 82 (right - 15m radius) showing carving sidecut geometry design differences. Northland follows a very Euro-centric non-race frontside carving shape, while DPS's geometry is completely different.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2018
    socalgal and Andy Mink like this.
  17. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    1,577
    Location:
    Reno
    Great review! As noted in my initial review, I very much enjoy the 87 in multiple types of snow. That hasn't changed. It, or the wider 94, would make a very good daily driver for the intermediate to advanced skier in the Sierra. They'd also be a good choice for the expert who likes to cruise rather than attack the hill. Both the 87 and 94 seem to prefer a more neutral stance though they can be tip pressured on those hero corduroy days.

    DPS has done a very nice job throughout the Foundation series, including the Uschi line for ladies.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2018
    Tricia likes this.

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