Featured Press Release: MARKER PRESENTS THE NEW DUKE PT

Discussion in 'Skiing and Industry News' started by Philpug, Nov 1, 2019.

  1. Philpug

    Philpug Notorious P.U.G. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    [​IMG]
    PENZBERG, Germany - (November 1, 2019) The Royal Family success story continues. Marker, the binding specialist based in Penzberg, Germany, presents the follow-up version of the legendary Duke, setting yet another milestone for the binding market. With the new Duke PT, a hybrid freeride binding, the company expands the boundaries for big mountain enthusiasts and expands its product portfolio with another pioneering ski binding.


    The ski industry in general, and the binding segment in particular, have undergone a number of changes. Evolutions in boots and skis have given skiers access to more and more of the mountain, with products that deliver an incredibly wide range of use. Product managers, developers and designers from the Penzberg company keep a watchful eye on these developments, and work with energy and commitment on products that provide skiers with the best possible set-up for their chosen discipline. Duke. Baron. Jester. Griffon. KingPin. Alpinist - these are just some of the products from Marker that have revolutionized the binding market in recent years and continue to shape the market today. Yet another highlight product is added to this impressive portfolio for the 20/21 winter season: the Marker Duke PT (Pin Technology).

    No compromise downhill, easy-going uphill
    Marker has tapped into all the experience gained in the freeride segment with its Royal Family to set a new milestone in an emerging category: hybrid freeride bindings. Marker sees a future here - no other type of binding manages to combine touring functionality and big mountain performance so flawlessly. The Duke PT blends the sort of downhill performance you get with the Jester with the uphill properties of a pin binding. For the 20/21 winter season Marker launches the Duke PT 16 and the Duke PT 12. Both models ensure DIN ISO certified release at both the toe piece and the heel, with a 6 to 16 range on the Duke PT 16 and a 4 to 12 range on the Duke PT 12.

    The biggest highlight on the new Duke PT is the innovative Ride & Hike toe. In ride mode it provides uncompromising downhill performance with full safety release properties up to DIN 16. In the event of a fall, the gliding AFD (Anti Friction Device) aids the lateral release unhindered by dirt, snow and ice. Switching the binding to hiking mode is simply a matter of unlocking the upper part of the toe piece and rotating it forward. In uphill mode, you have the option of saving 250 grams of weight per binding at the foot by removing the toe sections and stowing them in your backpack.

    Alternatively, the toe housing sections can be locked in the forward rotated position so you can quickly revert to downhill mode after a short uphill section. To switch to downhill mode the toe housing is clicked back onto the base plate. It locks into place thanks to Auto Quad Lock technology, just by stepping into the binding, without any extra action required by the skier. Pin binding technology is integrated in the base plate underneath the toe housing section and operates in much the same way as the KingPin and Alpinist models from Marker. The toe piece also has Sole.ID technology, just like other products in the Royal Family. This makes the binding compatible with all boot sole types falling under the alpine (ISO 5355), touring (ISO 9523), or GripWalk (ISO 9523) norms.
    Skiers using the Duke PT 16 will enjoy the superior holding power of the Inter Pivot Heel known from the former Jester and Duke models, and it has been redesigned to offer an easier step-in function. With its high-quality magnesium housing the heel covers release values from DIN 6 to 16, meeting the needs of even the most demanding big mountain environments. Premature releases are not only unwanted but also dangerous - this was something that played a major role in the development of the Duke PT and is the reason why the famous freeride heel from the Royal Family was used.

    The multi-functional Lock & Walk brake is another highlight in terms of functionality. In addition to the traditional braking function it offers a brake lock and a 10° climbing aid that can be operated with a ski pole. The key difference on the Duke PT 12 is a new Hollow Linkage heel, offering a weight savings of approximately 200 grams.

    The most advanced binding of its type
    Currently the lightest binding in its class, the Duke PT 12 weighs just 850 grams in uphill mode and 1,090 grams in downhill mode. The Duke PT 16 is only slightly heavier, weighing in at 1,000 grams in uphill mode and 1,280 grams in downhill mode. Its light weight ensures maximum downhill maneuverability, and a low stand height of 27 mm for both models ensures direct power transmission and quick edge changes – a benefit greatly appreciated by all skiers. All of these features and technologies naturally make the Duke PT one of the most advanced bindings in the hybrid freeride sector. Switching your setup mid-day to get the right bindings becomes a thing of the past – even if you spontaneously decide to do a quick skin lap - so you can concentrate on skiing and leave the rest to the binding.
     
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  2. Erik Timmerman

    Erik Timmerman Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    It would be a bummer if you dropped the toes in deep powder!

    Looks really cool though, I'd buy a set.
     
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  3. jmeb

    jmeb Stereotypical Front Range Weekend Warrior Skier

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    Glad to see some competition but hard to see where it is class leading in any way.

    Compared to the Shift
    - this is heavier, (You still have to carry those extra grams even if they are not on your feet, and only the 12 is lighter uphill. The 16 is heavier.)
    - requires storing extra pieces when you tour.
    - has a 16 DIN option.

    Compared to the CAST system this
    - has more moving parts,
    - lower DIN,
    - less tested bindings parts (CAST is just a Pivot 18 and Dynafit toe),
     
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  4. Mattadvproject

    Mattadvproject Love that powder! Pugski Sponsor

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    Interesting..... not sure if it's a Shift beater though? If it's heavier, has more moving parts (agree, would suck to lose those toe pieces in deep powder, but I guess you can keep them clipped on if you want?) I don't see the point apart from the 16 DIN. Not sure of the price, but if it's higher than the Shift, I don't see any major advantages or improvements over the Shift. The Shift seems more convenient and easier to use? Of course I say this all without trying it, but reading the text above, those are my concerns. Still, always good to see new tech in a segment I'm particularly interested in.....

    - Matt
     
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  5. Jtlange

    Jtlange Getting on the lift Skier

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    Cool concept, I'm sure all 8 people in the world outside of pro skiers that "NEED" a 16 DIN binding are pleased. :rolleyes:

    This looks like a solid wait a year type binding.
     
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  6. Slim

    Slim Out on the slopes Skier

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    I do like the lower DIN option. Shift starting at 6 makes it a NO-GO for my kids, for whom it would be perfect(=mostly inbounds, occasional touring).
    So, this might be an usefull option in the DIN 4-12 version, also because the parents could carry the toe pieces, to keep the uphill weight down for kids. still only about an ounce lighter than Shift without the toe pieces.

    Could also be usefull for those people with Volkl skis who wanted the ShIft but could mount them due to the ‘Marker only mounting zone’.

    So, glad to see more options in this market, and hopefully it will keep Amer Sports on their toes to add a lower DIN version of the Shift.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2019
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  7. Slim

    Slim Out on the slopes Skier

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    Indeed, for those people who (think they) need a higher release value than Cody Townsend, they can now go to 16...


    How do they get away with calling it the lightest binding in its class?
    Currently the lightest in its class.... Its light weight ensures maximum downhill maneuverability”

    Downhill weight on ski much higher than SHIFT! I don’t think the weight is a deal breaker, but I do get really pissed of by companies making outright lies.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2019
  8. jmeb

    jmeb Stereotypical Front Range Weekend Warrior Skier

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    If you define something as in it's own class, it's always the lightest.

    (But seriously, I guess you could argue that that the 12s uphill weight at 850g, is lighter than the verified weight of the Shift at 885g [Blister] or claimed weight of 865g [Salomon]. But it seems like BS to say that uphill weight on the foot == necessary weight. )
     
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  9. Slim

    Slim Out on the slopes Skier

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    But they were specifically talking about the downhill weight. As bolded by me.
    Further more, the binding still weighs the same, so even uphill you have the total weight.

    The only way they would have been correct in their press release would be if they wrote: “lightest weight on ski during uphill”. Even then it would have been amarketing stretch since it’s with a few grams of the Shift, but at least it would have been true.
     
  10. Slim

    Slim Out on the slopes Skier

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    Last edited: Nov 1, 2019
  11. ScottB

    ScottB Out on the slopes Skier

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    Seems like the lower 4 DIN setting will be a selling point. I am not impressed that you have to take parts off to get the weight just barely below a shift. They are definitely adding some spin with their "lightest binding" in its class. Heck, can I claim duct tape is the lightest binding on the market.

    If they shaved about 200 grams (1/2 pound) off the shifts weight, then they might attract some attention. That is the first thing I want to know about these new "convertible bindings", how much do they weigh. There is another similar binding hitting the market by BAM, called the Pinding. I saw a video that says it weighs 1300 grams. I think that is for one, so it is similar weight to a downhill binding. I may have that wrong, as the weight might be for a pair, if so they might have a competitive product. They are a start up type company, so similar to the CAST supplier.
     
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  12. Slim

    Slim Out on the slopes Skier

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    Is the BAM one actually ‘hitting the market’? They have been showing protos for years now.
     
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  13. Brian Finch

    Brian Finch PT, CSCS, Cert- DN, FRCms, M|WOD Coach Industry Insider

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    If nothing else Dalbello & Marker are consistent in taking parts off for the way up & putting em on before the down.
     
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  14. Thread Starter
    TS
    Philpug

    Philpug Notorious P.U.G. Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    I spent some time with a Volkl athlete who just returned from Europe after skiing this and spending some time with the development team. Obviously I got a companioning speak version of the binding but what he was most impressed with was the confidence the binding gave him when he was skiing. One of the questions I had for him was "Do you need tools to take it apart like the Lord SP?" and he said no, it is a tool less design and easy to switch over.
     
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  15. Mothertucker

    Mothertucker Sweep Dodger Skier

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  16. ScottB

    ScottB Out on the slopes Skier

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    I saw this post from a few days ago, this poster from Japan claims he bought the bindings, if I interpreted his post correctly. I went to the url below and it had no useful info, so who knows?


     
  17. Rod9301

    Rod9301 Out on the slopes Skier

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    Pretty idiotic, very complex, and with markers reputation for reliability, i wouldn't touch this.
     
  18. Masaki Goto

    Masaki Goto Booting up Skier

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    Hi, M.r ScottB

    This post is by me. Their website has not been updated much.
    Below is a reply from the CEO Mr.Markus on this October 20th. I'll post a photo when I got it.

    > We're still quite busy assemling the first few hundred PIMDING's and I'm still pretty stoked that one will make it to Japan :) I will be ready to send yours within the 5d of November, hopefully that's earl enough for you?

    pus, The official announcement by the manufacturer was about the development status and commercial availability because this product is not yet commercially available. The first shipment is for crowdfunding investors and some buyers (I contacted by e-mail). The sale at the ski shop will start after that.

    Allover PRICE is PINDING 499.95EURO plus.sending costs and VAT.

    This youtube video is from Freeride.com. Plese check it again.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2019
  19. Doug Briggs

    Doug Briggs Skiing the powder Industry Insider Pugski Ski Tester

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    Very Complex - I'm not sure how the mechanisms that allow this to work are any more complex than the Shift. The video doesn't really obviate the mechanics involved. The removable piece on the two isn't complex, IMO, so much as a gaumy solution to uphill weight.

    Reputation for Reliability - I'd say Markers are as solid as any other binding brand.

    It sounds like they may have addressed the perennial problem with the Royal family of bindings: "... it has been redesigned to offer an easier step-in function"

    I think 'idiotic' could have been used to describe the Shift when it was first introduced. I expect that the system will have its strong points and glitches (I recall the vertical spacing issues of the Shift AFD). I'm happy to wait and see.
     
    neonorchid likes this.
  20. Doug Briggs

    Doug Briggs Skiing the powder Industry Insider Pugski Ski Tester

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    Googling 'pinding' yields this video:

    If the downhill retention is good, this looks like a very elegant solution to a combo pin/traditional toe system.
     

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