Nice turns on firm snow, and steep

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by Rod9301, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. Rod9301

    Rod9301 Out on the slopes Skier

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 8, 2019
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  2. LiquidFeet

    LiquidFeet Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    Thanks for that.
     
  3. Mike King

    Mike King AKA Habacomike Instructor

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    What do you notice as the difference in the first turns and those that are later, when it is a bit less steep?

    Mike
     
  4. geepers

    geepers Out on the slopes Skier

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    Don't know about others but I noticed that I'd started breathing again. Reviting vid.
     
  5. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    They slide down quite a ways on each "turn". Snow was hard presumably.
    Looks like this is the face at a distance:

    IMG_5768.PNG
    Appears it's quite close to the city of Martigny, Switzerland.

    Here's a guy at Martigny station going skiing. That train on the right heads to Le Chable where you get the gondola up to Verbier.
    Verbier Trip 2016 081.JPG
     


  6. Thread Starter
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    Rod9301

    Rod9301 Out on the slopes Skier

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    In the first 15 seconds and then 1 50 to 2 10 it's step and firm so they both finish with a soft edge and slide vertically.

    In between, there is a double angle area where they have unequal turns, one uphill, i think to the right , and one where they turn a lot, i think to the left.

    The other thing i notice when it's steep that one of them, at least, had his skis quite far apart. Which is an error, leads to weighing the uphill ski when you want 100 percent on the downhill ski.
    Understandably though, because it's steep and intimidating
     
  7. tch

    tch What do I know; I'm just some guy on the internet. Skier

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    Completely admire the guts and commitment this took. And the skill. Beyond my comprehension.

    But...to me, for me... this is not "skiing". This is sliding downhill (down CLIFF?) with skis on your feet, alternating sides.
    I don't get it.
     
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  8. oldschoolskier

    oldschoolskier Out on the slopes Skier

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    I’m glad I’m old enough not to try that (maybe). :rolleyes:
     
  9. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    It's descending on skis. Ski mountaineering. They don't get dropped off by helicopter.
    They get to go up and down there:
    IMG_5768.jpg
    That's it.
     
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  10. 4ster

    4ster Now with more photos! Instructor

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    Old School ogsmile
    957024D6-27A8-4352-BCB4-0793BB0C99DA.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  11. TDK

    TDK Booting up Skier

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    The skis are probably not tuned with very sharp edges. I don't know for sure but would not think so. Some sort of wider twin tip skis? On hard surface like that they will slide quite a lot. And you want to do that as well. That way you make quicker progress down the hill with less turns. Also, many times you see skiers claim that jumping up in the air to turn is wrong or bad technique. Well good lock keeping your skis on the snow in conditions like that. Its totally imperative to jump and turn. It adds control. Less risk for the skis to catch an edge or bump over something and throw you off balance.
     
  12. Josh Matta

    Josh Matta Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    I love the critiques of this guys skiing, when I am pretty sure that no one in this thread except for probably @4ster would ever find their way to top or survive coming down that face....
     
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  13. tch

    tch What do I know; I'm just some guy on the internet. Skier

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    Josh, just to clarify... I NEVER critiqued the skiing here. Nor the skills needed to ascend and the guts to descend. I just said that this seems like a different activity to me than "skiing". Perhaps James has it right; it's "ski mountaineering".

    For me, skiing involves fluidity, grace, elegance, float, etc. I'm not trashing ski mountaineering; I just don't want to do it.
     
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  14. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    Not that I've skied with tons of guides, but I've never seen one with twin tip skis. For one it makes it too hard or impossible to jam your tails in snow when you have to do attend to something else without skis on.
     
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  15. Mike King

    Mike King AKA Habacomike Instructor

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    What I was noticing in the first turns was a fair amount of upper body rotation. In the later turns, there is much less, and more leg rotation.

    I'm not suggesting that upper body rotation is not a useful technique in certain circumstances. Just was noticing it.

    Mike
     
  16. chilehed

    chilehed Tom Skier

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    :eek:
    :hail:
     
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  17. JESinstr

    JESinstr Lvl 3 1973 Skier

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    Notwithstanding the superior athleticism and the incredible terrain he is conquering, I see little difference between the straight line bracing movements he is using in most of his redirections and the bracing used by many intermediates I see daily. The difference is that he has a knowledgeable understanding why he has to do what he is doing and the intermediates are sadly stuck in movement patterns developed by fear.
     
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  18. LiquidFeet

    LiquidFeet Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    @JESinstr, your intermediates can rotate their skis around as he does at the start of that run, that fast, and not inadvertantly travel left-right?
    Really?

    I see no bracing in that video.
    Here's some typical intermediate bracing. Outside leg is long and braced against the snow, with skier's body leaning in, putting significant weight on the inside ski. Outside ski washes outward.
    bracing, wide stance, inside.jpeg copy 4.jpeg bracing, diverging tips, DH ski washing out, weight on inside ski copy.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
  19. Thread Starter
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    Rod9301

    Rod9301 Out on the slopes Skier

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    Agree
     
  20. JESinstr

    JESinstr Lvl 3 1973 Skier

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    You mean like this?
    luisin.jpg

    My simple point is that much of skiing is the control of direction and speed. There are a number of movement patterns that can to get the ski redirected. I think most here agree redirection needs to start with the foot. As far as speed control goes, you have only 2 choices. Brace against the prevailing straight line force or convert it into circular travel.

    What the skier is doing is almost superhuman IMO but it doesn't change the fact that in terms of controlling his speed, he has only two options and those chutes he is navigating doesn't give him much of a choice in many instances.
     

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