MA request fo

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by Smear, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. JESinstr

    JESinstr Lvl 3 1973 Skier

    Joined:
    May 4, 2017
    Posts:
    301
    IMO, this drill addresses PSIA fundamental #1 . "Control the relationship between the Center of Mass and Base of Support...." To that end, it arguably addresses the main obstacle to improving one's skiing.

    If you just drag the poles as Greg is doing in the above video, the feedback is more of a sensor. If you create tension in the grip and focus on driving the tips of the pole into the surface, it will definitely affect your alignment movement patterns to the skier's benefit.
     
  2. dbostedo

    dbostedo Asst. Gathermeister--Big Sky Team Gathermeister

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Posts:
    2,419
    Location:
    Northern Virginia, USA
    Control that relationship, how? Make sure you're in what position? What problem does it correct?

    That type of pole drag is most memorable for me, as I did them for like an hour one day in a lesson. My hands were actually a bit sore. It really seemed to help with being centered (forward), hands in the right place, and some with separation, as I was also trying to keep the pole tips in the right place along the ski (near the boot), and not let them fall backward.
     
  3. JESinstr

    JESinstr Lvl 3 1973 Skier

    Joined:
    May 4, 2017
    Posts:
    301
    The relationship is one of a controlled and stable alignment of COM and BOS with the predominant force of record. Center of Mass is something I think we all can agree on but base of support is something else so here is my take.

    Off skis, we have multiple bases of support. When we create locomotion (walking, running etc) we use a sequence of heels and toes (plantar flexion) for brief moments as we propel ourselves using the surface between us and the force of gravity. When standing still (static) our base of support is predominantly our skeletal system through the heels. When in an athletic stance we are generally over the balls of the foot supported by the toes, heels light or in the air.

    But on skis, we want the bottom surface of our foot to remain in contact with the footbed so a new way to create a solid, stable base of support is needed. That base of support comes in the form of an arch...Your foot's arch to be specific, with the supporting pillars being the balls of the foot and the heel. This type of BOS is rarely used in our day to day static or dynamic balance activities so it is a totally new dynamic balance construct for many.

    Now, consider that the center of the ski is under the toes and friction pad of the binding. BUT, the center of shape is under the arch of the foot. Therefore, there is a turn shape bias towards the front of the ski. So when when we flex into the tongue of the boot, leverage is directed toward bending the front of the ski supporting turn creation and continuation. This does not mean we are forward, balancing over the balls of the feet. Quite the contrary, our COM to Base of Support relationship remains through the arch. It is the properties of boot design that is implementing pressure management forward and off skis, would be accomplished by balancing over the balls of the feet with support of the toes and plantar flexion.

    As pressure builds up from the snow, and if our COM is aligned with an arch based BOS, the arch collapses and our foot stretches inside the boot creating a tensioned environment which makes for a stronger and stable BOS. For the many whose balance focus is the heel (back seat) the ability flex into the boot and maintain a strong, stable BOS is problematic.
     
  4. Mike King

    Mike King AKA Habacomike Instructor

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2015
    Posts:
    878
    Location:
    Louisville CO/Aspen Snowmass
    Let me try it more succinctly that @JESinstr. You direct pressure along the length of the skis by adjusting the flex in your joints. If you want the pressure aft, you might open the ankle (plantar flex), flex the knee, and open the hip. If you want the pressure forward, you might close the ankle (dorsiflex), open (extend) the knee, and close the hip. To be in the center, you might look for alignment of body parts, say equal angles of the shins and the spine, with a complimentary angle in the femur (e.g. similar angles in the femur and shins).

    The fundamentals don't "fix" a problem, but describe elements of skills (edging, rotating, pressure) that affect balance and ski performance. They serve as a model to describe ski performance and the body movements that are causing it. Directing pressure along the length of the skis cause the skis to bend in different ways. If we direct pressure forward along the length of the skis, it causes the front of the ski to bend more than the tail. If done early in the shaping or control phase of the turn, this causes the tips of the skis to pull into the turn. If continued through shaping and the finish of the turn, it can cause the tail to take a wider path than the tip of the ski.

    Does this help?
     
  5. dbostedo

    dbostedo Asst. Gathermeister--Big Sky Team Gathermeister

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Posts:
    2,419
    Location:
    Northern Virginia, USA
    That's great... your post and @JESinstr ... BUT....

    You guys are explaining what the fundamentals are.. that I get I think. But I still don't see how the pole drag drill as shown directly helps with that. When I've done them, as I mentioned above, keeping the tips aligned with my boots helped with both being forward, and having some separation (when first learning that). Is that the intent here?
     


  6. JESinstr

    JESinstr Lvl 3 1973 Skier

    Joined:
    May 4, 2017
    Posts:
    301
    YES! The tips of the poles are an extension of your upper body. It not only helps you maintain fore and aft positioning over your BOS (you call it forward) but it helps laterally with the creation of angles. BTW it is laterally where most have problems executing the pole drag.... Many find it difficult to maintain pole tip contact with the outside/downhill surface especially deep into the turn.
     
    Nancy Hummel likes this.
  7. dbostedo

    dbostedo Asst. Gathermeister--Big Sky Team Gathermeister

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Posts:
    2,419
    Location:
    Northern Virginia, USA
    Thanks! And yes, I should have said "balanced", or correct fore and aft, rather than "forward"... but I'm coming from many years of being very backseat, so for me it was forward.
     
    JESinstr likes this.
  8. Thread Starter
    TS
    Smear

    Smear Putting on skis Skier

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2016
    Posts:
    82
    Thanks. Tried that and liked it as a focus. I guess the idea to have a focus that incorporates flexing and tipping at the same time? Especially good for lifting the big toe edge of the outside ski toward the end of the turn and then into next turn as the inside ski?

    Tried this drill the other day. Was skiing with the kids in the afternoon and went out again after putting them to bed. Had one hour and 15 min left before closing time. It was raining and the rain was freezing on the ground and on cables and lifts, causing the resort to close down everything but the green slope. I can gladly ski only the green slope in the preseason, but after the other slopes have been open it's hard to go back to just skiing the green slope. So this was not go to be fun. But if it was not going to be fun, at least I should do something productive, so I challenged my self to do 1 h and 15 min of continuous double pole drag.

    I liked it. It really makes me remember to flex in the transition. And I was able to combine it with other focuses like keeping the stance collected fore/aft and sideways, tipping the inside ski, etc and still remember to ditch the UP movement in the transition.

    But after 45 min of continuous pole drag it was getting a bit boring. To up the difficulty for the last 30 min I took of one ski. Double pole dragging is kind strenuous because of the always flexing. Doing it one-legged gives that one leg absolutely no rest. So it goes from strenuous to almost painful. The resulting leg soreness lasted for two days. I liked how it kept the body positions during the one-ski skiing more similar to normal skiing, especially when on little toe edge where I have a tendency to get into funky positions. And constantly flexing in the transition while skiing on one ski was a cool sensation. But it worked a lot better on the right leg than on the left leg. Wish I had two right legs...
     
    JESinstr and LiquidFeet like this.

Share This Page


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice