Bolder

Getting on the lift
Skier
Joined
Dec 1, 2017
Posts
259
Outside of this forum, skiing is largely a rich person's sport. We were in Chamonix last Christmas looking at the (way overpriced) Colmar store as a few Americans from Texas/Ok area wandered in, dropped about $2-3k in 10 minutes for a complete outfit for the 20 something daughter. You could tell that this is way they were used to shopping. If you've got millions then thousands don't matter.
 

Wasatchman

over the hill
Skier
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Posts
556
Location
Wasatch and NZ
[QUOTE="that kind of performance deserves like a $150 price point.
[/QUOTE]
You're paying $150 for the performance and $1150 for the cool looking wooly mammoth logo.

In general, Mammut does make great stuff but no doubt it is supremely expensive.
 

Wasatchman

over the hill
Skier
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Posts
556
Location
Wasatch and NZ
Outside of this forum, skiing is largely a rich person's sport. We were in Chamonix last Christmas looking at the (way overpriced) Colmar store as a few Americans from Texas/Ok area wandered in, dropped about $2-3k in 10 minutes for a complete outfit for the 20 something daughter. You could tell that this is way they were used to shopping. If you've got millions then thousands don't matter.
Sorry to say, but even within this forum skiing is still largely a rich man's sport unfortunately. Just how you define rich but I'd wager quite a bit of money average income on PugSki skews well above US average.
 

James

Skiing the powder
Instructor
Joined
Dec 2, 2015
Posts
9,026
Outside of this forum, skiing is largely a rich person's sport. We were in Chamonix last Christmas looking at the (way overpriced) Colmar store as a few Americans from Texas/Ok area wandered in, dropped about $2-3k in 10 minutes for a complete outfit for the 20 something daughter. You could tell that this is way they were used to shopping. If you've got millions then thousands don't matter.
Surely you saw all the people there who aren't that, clomping around.
 

dovski

Waxing my skis and praying for snow
Skier
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Posts
536
Location
Seattle
Outside of this forum, skiing is largely a rich person's sport. We were in Chamonix last Christmas looking at the (way overpriced) Colmar store as a few Americans from Texas/Ok area wandered in, dropped about $2-3k in 10 minutes for a complete outfit for the 20 something daughter. You could tell that this is way they were used to shopping. If you've got millions then thousands don't matter.
Last time I checked Christmas in Chamonix was a rich person's ski vacation :roflmao:Sorry that was a little too easy. Bottom line is that even within this forum we are pretty fortunate because skiing, even when you grind every angle for deals and discounts, is still an expensive sport. In fact one could argue that skiing in the US is more expensive than Europe of Canada.

Now I think it is fair to say the most on this forum will focus on function over fashion i.e. we will pay a premium (all be it a discounted premium) for hand made Swiss skis that float and carve like a dream, but are not going to pay that same premium for couture ski fashion. Either way we are spending the same money we just prioritize differently. And we are incredibly lucky that we have 1st world problems like this.
 

martyg

Out on the slopes
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
704
Ah, but how much will you miss it?

Comparative value is a funny thing. If I had saved the money I spent on my upper-middle market Raleigh in '79, I would have (just barely) enough for a lower-middle market bike today.

Luxury/lust goods prices just about always rise faster than interest rates. If one can actually afford something one is lusting after, then I say one should buy it. When that first item shows up at the thrift store/craigslist/bringatrailer, the new lust items will be priced beyond one's savings on not buying the first item.
This.

Neither of my parents graduated high school. I went in the service at 18, making $5,000 per year. At the end of 4 years, through saving every penny and shroud investment, I amassed $40K. That was in 1982. I grew that initial $40k, and several businesses, to the point where virtually all of my decisions are now based on what will enhance my life, not on “cost” Anyone, and everyone has the capability to achieve this.

Although like everything, cost is directly related to value. If a $70k vehicle will provide 95% of what I want, why would I purchase a $200k vehicle that checks every box, and sub box?
 

martyg

Out on the slopes
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
704
And we are incredibly lucky that we have 1st world problems like this.
Love that. Having been stationed in places where starvation and genocide is the real deal, we have to put our ski related conundrums into perspective.

One of our tenets is a anesthesiologist. She donates her time heavily to Doctors Without Borders, often volunteering to go to places where women are treated like livestock, and her safety is at risk. I am awed by who she is as a human being, and by her work.

Great reminder.
 

dovski

Waxing my skis and praying for snow
Skier
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Posts
536
Location
Seattle
This.

Neither of my parents graduated high school. I went in the service at 18, making $5,000 per year. At the end of 4 years, through saving every penny and shroud investment, I amassed $40K. That was in 1982. I grew that initial $40k, and several businesses, to the point where virtually all of my decisions are now based on what will enhance my life, not on “cost” Anyone, and everyone has the capability to achieve this.

Although like everything, cost is directly related to value. If a $70k vehicle will provide 95% of what I want, why would I purchase a $200k vehicle that checks every box, and sub box?
Completely agree with your line of thinking. I like to think of what I spend on skiing as an investment that improves the quality of my family's life.

With regard to cost being directly related to value, I agree to a point. You need to actively drive the cost to value ratio. These day I see a lot of dumb money out there … though I guess this is also a first world problem :)
 

Greg Eaton

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Jan 14, 2020
Posts
4
Location
Virginia
I joined this Pugski just to post about this! Thanks for the thread. I'll admit I have nothing constructive to offer, just intended to rant. But now I've calmed down. You mentioned a shell for $1K+! I was going to rant about $600 for the same. So is it just the label? I see Gore Tex Pro is a relatively new technology now. It wouldn't surprise me if it really is a better material. And there are some innovations that seem good, like goggle pockets, helmet compatible hood. But I just can't spend like that! I will acknowledge that refreshing outerwear is a reasonable thing to do, because waterproofness wears out. Does anyone have opinions about "re-waterproofing" an older shell? Nikwax treatment in the washing machine or something?
 

ARL67

Invisible Airwaves Crackle With Life
Skier
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Posts
500
Location
Waterloo, ON, Canada
The great deals are out there on all this higher-end brand stuff, be it skis or clothing. I’ve had many Kastle and Stockli and DPS, either new or gently used, but I put time and effort into finding and waiting for the deals at end of season sales, or a great buy & sell postings. Same with clothing from Arcteryx and my new favourite Norrona. And you have to pounce when the deal is there or it will be gone. I don’t expect to walk into any store at start, peak, or mid season and get 40-50% off, but I do when the season is near over.
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
Pugski Ski Tester
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Nov 1, 2015
Posts
22,992
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Reno, eNVy
I joined this Pugski just to post about this! Thanks for the thread. I'll admit I have nothing constructive to offer, just intended to rant. But now I've calmed down. You mentioned a shell for $1K+! I was going to rant about $600 for the same. So is it just the label? I see Gore Tex Pro is a relatively new technology now. It wouldn't surprise me if it really is a better material. And there are some innovations that seem good, like goggle pockets, helmet compatible hood. But I just can't spend like that! I will acknowledge that refreshing outerwear is a reasonable thing to do, because waterproofness wears out. Does anyone have opinions about "re-waterproofing" an older shell? Nikwax treatment in the washing machine or something?
Welcome. This isn't just skiing. It is every type of product range, all have their premiums, watches, bikes, cars, purses, audio, ect. The best part of skiing is, you don't have to spend $600-1000K plus for a shell to enjoy the sport. There are some really good lesser priced options out there that cost a (small) fraction of these jackets but offer the majority of the performance.
 

Wasatchman

over the hill
Skier
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Posts
556
Location
Wasatch and NZ
I joined this Pugski just to post about this! Thanks for the thread. I'll admit I have nothing constructive to offer, just intended to rant. But now I've calmed down. You mentioned a shell for $1K+! I was going to rant about $600 for the same. So is it just the label? I see Gore Tex Pro is a relatively new technology now. It wouldn't surprise me if it really is a better material. And there are some innovations that seem good, like goggle pockets, helmet compatible hood. But I just can't spend like that! I will acknowledge that refreshing outerwear is a reasonable thing to do, because waterproofness wears out. Does anyone have opinions about "re-waterproofing" an older shell? Nikwax treatment in the washing machine or something?
Hi Greg,

I have a 23 year-old gore-tex shell I occassionally treat with nikwax. Works great. Will it be as effective in a deluge? I don't know but I don't ski in the rain and only wear it skiing. Plenty effective in Utah even on the biggest pow days though. Even though I could get something newer, I'm attached to this old trusty shell and works fine. FWIW, I have even received a few compliments on it including someone yelling down above me from the ski lift last year (maybe from people who recognize how old it is?). And I started another thread on it, but I really take notice when someone is wearing an old and now bankrupt ski brand, and I will sometimes compliment them on it. Adds some flavor on the hill to all those $600 Arc-teryx jackets all over the hill these days.

For an average day of resort skiing, I wonder how much of a difference people would notice with the newer gore-tex materials?
 
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cantunamunch

Meh
Skier
Joined
Nov 17, 2015
Posts
8,251
Sorry to say, but even within this forum skiing is still largely a rich man's sport unfortunately. Just how you define rich but I'd wager quite a bit of money average income on PugSki skews well above US average.
I fee truly sorry for US-average car ventilation then. :roflmao::geek::nono::ogbiggrin:

 
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