How often do you replace your diamond stones?

Discussion in 'Tuning Techniques and Tool Information' started by Mendieta, Dec 23, 2018.

  1. Mendieta

    Mendieta Master of Snowplow Moderator

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    Hi

    My moonflex 200 (first stone I bought and used) is now 1 year old. I probably used it 25 times or so (25 pairs of skis), including bringing my son's rusty edges back in shape last year. I know have a file, and as I get a little better at this, I can tell when to file instead of passing a stone (meaning, when there is enough damage to the side edge to need a little filing). I think this should make my stones last longer.

    Anyway, my 200 looks beat up. The 400, I use a lot less often and seems fine. Do you guys have any rule of thumb as to how many tuneups a diamond stone should last?

    Many thanks for any help!
     
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  2. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

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    A moonflex 200 stone should last a long time. A lot longer than deburring 25 pairs of skis.
    It's probably filled with metal cuttings, wax and side wall material.
    Clean it and it will look much better. Soap, water and a brass brush will get almost anything off.
    Examine it closely after cleaning. You should be able to see the wear pattern on the diamonds.
     
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  3. oldfashoned

    oldfashoned Getting off the lift Skier

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    My 600 is at least 5 seasons old and use it constantly. Still good. I move it around after each edge, and clean it after use,
    You can rub your finger on the surface and see if areas are getting smooth.
    200? I used it 1 time and found it too corse. I only use the 600. Keeps my arm in shape :golfclap:
     
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  4. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    If you use a lot of pressure with no lube > Heat = diamonds lose bond. Of corse now will get the posts about how that's impossible blah blah. Diamonds are bonded to the metal plate.

    Usually replace far after they should be because of laziness and expense.
    Honestly the same thing happens with regular sandpaper. Most people struggle and don't replace worn out or clogged paper nearly soon enough.
     
  5. Talisman

    Talisman Getting off the lift Team Gathermeister

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    Also a clean stone works better.
     
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    Mendieta

    Mendieta Master of Snowplow Moderator

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    Thank you, all I clean mine with a toothbrush after use. In the same solution I lubricate it during use: 50% water 50% alcohol. It does have a couple spots where the diamond is gone. I think it might have gotten damaged by improper use of soneone learning how to use a diamond stone. I think it cost $25. It wouldn't feel too bad if it only lasted 25 uses. About a buck a use.

    But it seems I should be ok for at least some time.

    I like the 200 as a nice compromise that deburrs easily but ia also smooth enough for my use.

    Yesterday i filed (after 6 early season days of diamond touches) so I used both 200 and 400.
     
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  7. Primoz

    Primoz Making fresh tracks Skier

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    Diamonds can last forever or just few months, depending how you use it. With ski maintenance, diamonds are meant to be used freehand (yes yes I know ;) ) and with almost zero pressure. And even for that, lubrication is good thing. If used this way, it will last forever. I change them maybe every 7 or 8 years, and I'm pretty sure my diamonds see more use then normal person here use them.
    Now if you beat the hell out of them, having them fixed to file guide and "polish" edge for hours, and especially if you add some (read: a lot) pressure to that, I'm pretty sure you should be shopping for new ones once a month... if you don't file your skis every day but more 2 or 3 times a month ;)
     
  8. RobSo

    RobSo Booting up Skier

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    For me, Moonflex 200 would last me 1 season. 100 would be done after 2 seasons. As for 400 and 600, I never had to replace them. This was for 2 racers, each with 5 pairs of skis, and training 4 days per week. Now, all my hand tools are just collecting dust, thanks to Razor Tune.
     
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  9. spackler

    spackler Booting up Skier

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    I am tuning 4-6 pairs of skis twice a week, have a range of moonflex grits, and they are all in great shape still 4 years since I purchased them. I use soapy water as lube with each use, and clean them every time afterwards. I was thinking this might be the year I had to replace the 100 or 200, but they still look good.
     
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    Mendieta

    Mendieta Master of Snowplow Moderator

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    So, that's about 400 uses. Wow. Do you use a file when there is apparent minor damage? ( hitting a rock, etc). What kind of soap? Thanks!
     
  11. oldfashoned

    oldfashoned Getting off the lift Skier

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    I have used the 400 for a ratty edge clean up. Just keep passing over the area until the noise goes away, 8-10 passes, then switch to the 600. Light pressure as was mentioned. I don't weigh that much so maybe i'm not blowing the edges out, and I do seem to find all the hidden gems!
    As for the 50% alcohol mix :rocks:
     
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  12. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    I think my first diamond stone I wore it out in one use. No lube, tons of pressure, lots of heat.
     
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  13. Jacques

    Jacques Workin' It on Skis Best I Can Skier

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    To save your diamonds when things are very dinged up or rusty start by wrapping 220 grit wet and dry sandpaper around a stone.
    Then use that just like a stone first. Make enough passes to smooth things out a bit before you use the stones. Use plenty of fluid.
    Some times your going to need to file.
    Use the sandpaper first! Then make a lot of passes to soften any hard areas. Then the file will work the way it should.
    Stones are really just to polish and not so much to cut.
    You can soften and remove small burrs with them, but don't use them on a really ragged banged up edge. Use the paper first.
    220 3M wet dry paper cheep. Stones expensive.
    Take a look for a few moments here YT video.
     
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  14. mdf

    mdf entering the Big Couloir Skier

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    Or get a whetstone from Harbor Freight for bad dings.
     
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    Mendieta

    Mendieta Master of Snowplow Moderator

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    Interesting. Why not simply using a file? Wouldn't that restore the edge more easily and uniformly?
     
  16. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

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    The burrs are harder than the files.
     
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  17. Polo

    Polo Putting on skis Skier

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    If I'm working an edge with some nasty rash that's been run over or across some rocks I'll use a panzer file to cut any of that nasty stuff off with. Panzer files have big robust teeth and will make quick work of even the nastiest burrs or damaged edge without damaging any of my more expensive tools. Depending on the degree of damaged edge, determines which file or diamond stone I use first. My 100 and 200 diamond stones last me the longest because I use them the least. The rest of my diamond stones last quite a long time as well, but I only ever use them for touch up work and not much else.
     
  18. oldschoolskier

    oldschoolskier Out on the slopes Skier

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    Biggest way to wear out diamond stones and files prematurely is too much pressure at the wrong moment.

    On a file it is on the back stroke, ideally lift if possible. Cause the tooth to round over and the file tohave dull spots.

    On a diamond it is in both strokes as instead of featuring the diamond as they wear (becoming finer grits) they damage the material holding where the diamonds fasten causing bald spots.

    Too make matters simple, light ease press in the forward stroke, lift (completely) in the back stroke. Increases life of the cutting tools both files and stones.
     
  19. KevinF

    KevinF Gathermeister-Stowe Team Gathermeister

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    I pretty much just use my 200 and 400 grit Moonflex stones. I’ve had the same ones for four or five years now. They get used 40 or so times a season.

    They still seem to work just fine. I figured for recreational purposes that diamond stones were essentially indestructible. I just use a water and alcohol mix as my lube. And clean them with soap and water every month or so.

    I do have a newer 200 grit stone... I’ll have to look to see if there’s any noticeable wear.
     
  20. Chef23

    Chef23 Putting on skis Skier

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    Water and rubbing aalcohol to lubricate?
     

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