Dryland drills for absorption?

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by TheArchitect, Jan 23, 2019.

  1. TheArchitect

    TheArchitect Working on my technique all the time Skier

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    Are there any dryland drills people do to get better at absorbing bumps? I sometimes have problems with being too inflexible (body and mind ogsmile ), hitting a bump and getting launched.
     
  2. Jerez

    Jerez Out on the slopes Skier

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    An elliptical machine, preferably lateral elliptical. instead of letting the machine push your feet, use it by keeping your upper body (from hips up) stationary vertically. That is, use only your legs going up and down under a still top half. Concentrate only on bringing your leg/knee up, not your foot down to make it go. Make sense? Great for that.
     
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  3. Plai

    Plai Paul Lai Skier

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    Here's a video discussing how to get comfortable on gentle rollers. Not exactly dry land, but not moguls either. I use the same in gentle bumps/cut-up snow in traverses to the same effect. Just try to keep the upper body stable, while the legs absorb.

     
  4. Kneale Brownson

    Kneale Brownson Out on the slopes Instructor

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    If you can’t find some rollers like that, you can try shallow angle traverses across a bump field, especially a less steep bump field. The goal is to be able to relax the legs and let the terrain push your feet up and then extend the legs to maintain ski/snow contact. The rollers would be easier for starting out.
     
  5. 4ster

    4ster Now with more photos! Instructor

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    Pump track


    Everyone should have one of these in their yard.
     


  6. Plai

    Plai Paul Lai Skier

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    That reminds me... I took up a little skateboarding when I started skiing in order to train balance and forward stance. Hadn't thought of it as absorption drill, but yeah, see it now. Cool!
     
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  7. Thread Starter
    TS
    TheArchitect

    TheArchitect Working on my technique all the time Skier

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    Thanks guys. I'll try those things out. That skateboard park looks pretty cool.
     
  8. Josh Matta

    Josh Matta Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    the best way to learn flex and extend is to go find a flat a bump run and traverse keeping you upper body as quiet as possible by pro active flex and extend. Pump tracks are great for learning this as well, but ARE much harder than traversing bump field because you arent just absorbing, and extending, you have to learn to PUMP and gain speed, since they are basically impossible to pedal on.
     
  9. LuliTheYounger

    LuliTheYounger I'm just here to bother my mom Skier

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    "Learn to gallop horses from a bunch of wayward jockeys" is my real answer, but that might be a bit much. :rolleyes:

    Failing that - I don't know if this is part of the issue, but I've noticed in a couple sports that a lot of people struggle with shock absorption because they're uncomfortable getting in/out of a squat when they're moving. Sometimes it's purely the muscle strength, sometimes it's keeping their balance fore/aft while they squat, sometimes they can do the first two but they're just mentally freaked out by doing it at speed. A lot of people are totally capable of the same motion on dry ground but absolutely lose it in motion for whatever reason.

    If that is part of the issue, doing squats on a balance board and on skates has really helped me solidify the muscle memory a bit more. I think I started out with just unweighted holds, and then worked up to doing random variations like doing it on one foot, adding weights, moving my upper body & arms to try to shake myself out of alignment, and just testing how fast I can get up & down in different variations without losing it.
     
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  10. mister moose

    mister moose Instigator Skier

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    When I first started trying this, I was late. Someone told me to actively suck up my feet, and I found this worked better (for me at least). If you wait for the bump or roller to push your feet up, and you wait for that to happen, you miss most of the absorption. For me, pro active absorption works better than passive absorption.
     
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  11. Bad Bob

    Bad Bob old n' slow Skier

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    A BOSU ball laid flat side down.
    Go side to side keeping your head level and hands in front of you for a couple of minutes and you just had a pretty good bump run.
    Note to self, must get a new BOSU ball to replace the one the dog chewed.
     
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  12. Thread Starter
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    TheArchitect

    TheArchitect Working on my technique all the time Skier

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    I even have a Bosu ball at home!
     
  13. Novaloafah

    Novaloafah Should've paid attention to that lesson. Skier

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    Bosu are great. I got into it because a physio had me using it to rehab an MCL. I do squats on it (flat side down) turning torso left then right with hands out front. one leg balancing holding still, side jumps. Never thought how it could be used for bump training cuz I rarely see bumps, but it makes perfect sense to me.
     
  14. John Nedzel

    John Nedzel Booting up Skier

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    Depth drops, at least I think that's what they are called. Step up into a plyo box, drop off, land on both feet as softly and quietly as possible. Start with a low box. Work to taller boxes.
     
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  15. Wilhelmson

    Wilhelmson Out on the slopes Skier

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    With this weather you could make a flume off your roof and waterski down it. Or other stuff like ski boot base jumps off your deck, run into the garage door, ride your bike or skateboard into a curb.

    People at the Weston ski track train on skis on wheels - that could get very ugly. For me I would have to put a chair on roller skates to mimic crashing into objects while in the backseat position; I think it would train me to get upright to brace for the impact.
     
  16. Beartown

    Beartown Chasing the dragon Skier

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    reACT trainer. Not sure if they still make them, but my local gym has one.

     
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  17. Thread Starter
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    TheArchitect

    TheArchitect Working on my technique all the time Skier

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    That’s pretty cool but it don’t know if that’s a real option. I’ve never seen one in a gym around here
     
  18. T-Square

    T-Square Terry Moderator Instructor

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    A Skier’s Edge can help.



    Practice keeping your hips at the same level. Great for learning the feeling of the cross under move too.
     
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  19. skix

    skix Getting on the lift Skier

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    Dryland training? You could try doing it like Jonny Moseley back in the day ...

     
  20. KingGrump

    KingGrump Most Interesting Man In The World Team Gathermeister

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    The Skier's Edge machine is a good way to learn A&E.
    A step from that set up is to swap out the that platform for a mogul/powder platform.
     
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