Featured Sponsored DPS Phantom 2.0 Permanent Waxless Glide Review

Discussion in 'Chairlift Chat' started by SkiEssentials, Nov 2, 2018.

  1. SkiEssentials

    SkiEssentials Slashing Turns and Prices Pugski Sponsor

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    We're psyched to announce that we're officially setup as a dealer for DPS Phantom 2.0 Permanent Waxless Glide! We're really excited about this stuff. Just about everyone on our staff will be treating their skis with it this season, and we're fully setup to do the application and curing process in house before we ship out skis!
     
    socalgal, RJS, 1chris5 and 3 others like this.
  2. ScottB

    ScottB Getting on the lift Skier

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    I used it on 4 skis last year and it works just as they say. No BS on this product, it does what they say it does. It was a time saver for my families skis and I didn't have to worry about what wax I needed for the ski trip, it seems to work pretty well in all temperatures and snow conditions. Good luck and I suspect once people get more exposure to it, its popularity will soar.
     
    Mendieta likes this.
  3. Mendieta

    Mendieta Master of Snowplow Moderator

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    This is exactly what Phantom needs. Shops to apply them. The curing station makes a lot of sense. How will this work for your customer, in terms of pricing? I am assuming it will be a check out option ... How much does it add to the skis cost?

    I skied phantom treated demo skis last spring. Very sticky slush. They did really well. I am sold!
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
  4. pchewn

    pchewn Out on the slopes Skier

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    Beaverton OR
    I applied it to 3 pair at the end of this summer, when there was sunshine here in Oregon. Sun is gone, now I need some snow.
     
    Doug Briggs likes this.
  5. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

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    I found it to be as good or a bit better than all purpose wax without the need to wax. I've said it numerous times: if you like to wax your skis or need that nth degree of performance, wax will work better. If you don't like waxing or don't want to drop off/pick up skis several times per season Phantom is the ticket.
     
    ScottB likes this.


  6. Doug Briggs

    Doug Briggs Making fresh tracks Pugski Ski Tester Industry Insider

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    So... How do your bases look? Is there base burn along the edges? Did you ski abrasive snow? That's what I want to know.
     
  7. Andy Mink

    Andy Mink I am a half fast skier. Moderator

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    The skis I used were in @Philpug's test fleet. They were used in conditions ranging from sweet fresh powder to spring glop. Lots of manmade, groomed, refrozen, and chopped up. I thought the bases looked fine last time I looked. @Philpug can take a look at them and give a more experienced assessment.
     
    Doug Briggs likes this.
  8. ScottB

    ScottB Getting on the lift Skier

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    My quick answer is no base burn, the bases look like they always look to me, fine. I put this on my SLrace ski that I use for coaching and get close to 20 days a season on them on hardpack, man made snow. I coach at Ski Bradford in Mass. The skis have been sitting in the basement all summer. I will take a look at them tonight and take (post) a few pictures. The other skis had less days on them, but they all looked fine as well. I read some of your posts on another thread about this. My 2 cents is if I have experienced base burn on my skis, I wasn't aware of it. I might ski 30 times a season. I used 1 pair of skis for a good 20 years and never waxed them. I am probably not sensitive to "base burn", but I still have those skis and the bases look fine. They are clear bases, so I wonder if that doesn't show base burn. I have seen skis with black bases and they have turned grey, whiteish. In the last 6 years I have obtained a ski quiver and I have probably seen that once on a used pair. I wonder if what we see is the black dye in the plastic oxidizing and turning color? To me this is not a serious issue, but I could be very wrong.

    I own a boat and I have seen a lot of plastic parts get "chauky" and the surface gets a powder on it and they get brittle. To me, the sun breaks them down and maybe the surface gets oxidized. I don't think that happens to skis (unless you fall a lot on sunny days and expose your bases :philgoat:) but I could see the snow abrading the bottoms, like sand paper. I expect that wax acts as a lubricant against the snow. I don't think DPS's Phantom adds any lubrication like wax, it just modifies the surface tension and what ever else to reduce friction. Wax will fill in the micro surface voids and add some protection, I doubt Phantom does that. But that doesn't mean is makes your skis slide less well. The info that first came out about DPS and base grinding was misinterpreted. They basically said that Phantom will not change the frequency or need for base grinding skis any more or less than waxing. If wax offers some protection (lubrication) that Phantom does not, it might not be entirely true on the frequency aspect. I also suspect that racing (especially downhill at high speeds) might be much worse for your bases than recreational skiing. So the statement they made is subject to how the skis aare used.
     
    Andy Mink likes this.
  9. Joe Strummer

    Joe Strummer Booting up Skier

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    Squamish, BC
    I love the idea of this. But it only makes sense to me when you buy new skis. I'm not going to blow $100 (US) on skis that I will only use for two or three years. I generally ski on three different skis throughout the season. I do my own tuning so my only variable outlay is wax. Fixed costs (iron, scraper, brushes, etc) were incurred years ago and are asymptotic to zero.
     
    SpikeDog likes this.

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