avgDude

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I've often wondered what the weight of my skis/bindings/boots is? particularly when it's all dangling while I ride the chairlift. Anyway, I finally got around to weighing the stuff. My Tecnica Phnx 90 boots are 2338 grams (5 lbs 2.5 oz) each. and my Salomon X-Wing 10 skis with integrated bindings are 6690 grams (7 lbs 6 oz) each. So that is approx 25+ lbs on my feet, dangling.

Seems like a lot, but maybe it's typical, and maybe I shouldn't overthink it.

Anyway, I planning on getting some new gear this fall, so I was wondering if I should be thinking about lighter stuff if possible? Manufacturers are spotty at best about publishing weights.

What's everyone's thoughts?
 

KingGrump

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All depends upon whether the extra weight is causing you pain in the head or knees.
 

jmeb

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Yes weight matters. Sometimes weight is bad. Sometimes its good. It depends entirely on a skiers preferences and demands they make of their equipment.

A 1700g ski is going to ski very different than a 2300g one. A 1600g boot differently than a 2200g one.
 

trailtrimmer

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Frontside/Carving/Racing skis, not at all, this class of ski is heavy for a reason.

All mountain, should be lighter than above, I still pay no attention to it.

Powder, park and play skis need to be a bit lighter for pivots, spins and playfulness.

Skinning/uphill, you better believe it matters.
 

cantunamunch

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Anyway, I planning on getting some new gear this fall, so I was wondering if I should be thinking about lighter stuff if possible?
...
What's everyone's thoughts?
Honestly, so much else has happened since the X-Wing design was current that overall weight is about the last thing you need to worry about.

You're going to be rethinking everything from fit to flex to length and front-side/back-side balance - sticking weight in as a decision criterion is not likely to be useful, and may well be a red herring.

Chances are you'll wind up with lighter gear without trying. Most noticeably, improved fit of the ski boots you should be getting combined with improved playfulness of modern ski design will give everything a lighter feel anyway.
 

jzmtl

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The only time I notice the weight is when riding chairs without foot rest. 15 minutes of Atomic double decker dragging my knee starts to get uncomfortable.
 

Eleeski

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Of course weight matters!

It is just one factor in the design and performance of a ski but it certainly has an effect.

Lightweight materials are expensive so they might not be used as extensively as pure performance would dictate. Plus the lightweight product might not be as durable - how long do you want to keep your skis?

Top skiers might need the traits that overbuilt equipment offers. I certainly don't need a DIN of 18 or a non bending ski for how I ski. But we want what Bode or Mikela uses so we suffer with heavy stuff because it's the "best".

A lot of the new equipment is reasonably light, durable and appropriate. Demo to see what you like.

Eric
 

martyg

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Excluding park...

I find that in-bounds skiers who obsess over light weight equipment either ski with their upper bodies, or really hone in on rotary movement, but haven't developed pressure control and / or edging motions. It is definitely more about the Indian than the arrow. Changing the arrow to "something else" might help you capture a sensation that is eluding you, and help you progress, but without coaching you won't know what that sensation is, how to recognize it, how to capture it.

All of my front side skis - except my in-bounds powder skis - have metal in them. A few have Marker's WC Piston late, which in itself is heavy. The only time that I thing about weight is on AT gear, and then it is not my primary driver in decisions.
 

GregK

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As everyone has said, I would never go searching for gear to be light unless you are touring as weight helps with stability over rough terrain etc while skiing
at a resort.

Search for new gear that properly fits your feet, skis that match your style of skiing/conditions and you will end up with gear that will be less fatiguing to ski yet more stable. Technology in newer gear has improved performance that sometimes just happens to be at lighter weight than before. A proper fitting modern boot will be a revelation compared to those boots!
 

Eleeski

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"Weight helps with stability over rough terrain". Hmmm, not sure I personally agree. If a heavy ski gets bumped off my desired path, it's harder to bring it back. I can put the light ski where I need it to thread my way through the crud.

Differences in personal preference and skiing style.

But nobody adds weights to a ski.

Eric
 

GregK

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"Weight helps with stability over rough terrain". Hmmm, not sure I personally agree. If a heavy ski gets bumped off my desired path, it's harder to bring it back. I can put the light ski where I need it to thread my way through the crud.

Differences in personal preference and skiing style.

But nobody adds weights to a ski.



Eric
Heavy skis don’t get bumped off the desired path as that heavier weight is resisting deflection. You’re almost describing stiff but light skis with poor damping which can be a lot of work in crud being tossed around vs a heavier but more forgiving flex that can absorb rougher terrain with ease.

I learned years ago the key to skiing crud is to always be on edge through rougher sections so you wouldn’t be bucked off track as easily and great crud skis make this even easier.

All my skis have to be great in crud as I face those conditions almost daily at my local resorts. Heavy Spring crud is an absolute riot for my Moment Bibby’s where many skiers are done at noon when it’s “too much work/too hard” to ski and the Bibby’s crush it with ease.

Here’s a list of common width skis ranked in crud/stability performance and all the stable ones are heavier, solid flexing skis that absorb terrain roughness without drama with the poorly rated ones are usually lighter and softer flexing.
 

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Eleeski

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I did preface my comment with the personal preference disclaimer. For me as a weak slow old guy, a big burly ski in crud is just uncontrollable. It's going where it wants to. A more nimble ski can pick a fun line in those conditions.

I do ski Squaw which is famous for ungroomed terrain. And for the shortest half life for powder. So crud happens there a lot. Personally, the more cruddy the conditions, the more I want a light feeling ski.

Note that light feeling is not always the physically lightest - but less mass helps.

Damping properties of a ski are defined by many different variables. With the advances in design, materials and construction techniques, weight becomes a less critical factor.

Not sure how the above list was generated. I don't see many of those skis in the KT lift line (or available to demo at the local shops). My 175s are a more common length than the 185+ that most of the skis seemed to be. Variations in skier size, ability, attitude and style make that kind of list less definitive.

I certainly don't mean to say that you won't enjoy crud more on a big heavy stable ski. I will be rocking the same snow on my light twitchy skis. When bumps develop out of the crud in a couple hours, we'll deal with that then.

Eric
 

GregK

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I did preface my comment with the personal preference disclaimer. For me as a weak slow old guy, a big burly ski in crud is just uncontrollable. It's going where it wants to. A more nimble ski can pick a fun line in those conditions.

I do ski Squaw which is famous for ungroomed terrain. And for the shortest half life for powder. So crud happens there a lot. Personally, the more cruddy the conditions, the more I want a light feeling ski.

Note that light feeling is not always the physically lightest - but less mass helps.

Damping properties of a ski are defined by many different variables. With the advances in design, materials and construction techniques, weight becomes a less critical factor.

Not sure how the above list was generated. I don't see many of those skis in the KT lift line (or available to demo at the local shops). My 175s are a more common length than the 185+ that most of the skis seemed to be. Variations in skier size, ability, attitude and style make that kind of list less definitive.

I certainly don't mean to say that you won't enjoy crud more on a big heavy stable ski. I will be rocking the same snow on my light twitchy skis. When bumps develop out of the crud in a couple hours, we'll deal with that then.

Eric
What’s interesting is that even today’s heavy, long heavy, charger skis are still lighter than the OP current skis so WHATEVER he chooses will be lighter. Current 130 flex boots are also much lighter so he’ll be lighter without even trying.

There are some unicorn skis that are both light in swing weight and not heavy in actual weight compared to Charger skis but can happily mow crud at speed or pick their way through like you seem to. They are also effortless and a blast through tracked out powder too.

The Moment Wildcat is available in 116 and 108 widths and both are game changing. Considered by many including myself as the reference standard in powder skis. So versatile for conditions or styles of skiing. Perfect Squaw ski.

In this review they talk about its versatility through crud etc and new testers new to the ski experience why it’s such a revered ski in the industry. Think every skier needs to demo them to see why the hype is so well earned. I honestly giggle whenever I ski mine as they are so effortless when others are struggling in tough conditions.

https://blisterreview.com/gear-reviews/2019-2020-moment-blister-pro-wildcat
 

DanoT

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Wait matters. I don't like lineups.:duck:
 

Dan P

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Powder7 has several ski, binding, and boot weights listed on their site....check it out for reference.

Obvi, the lightest gear is made to go up-hill. That said, with modern materials and manufacturing processes there is a good amount of light(er) weight options for alpine skis, boots, and bindings (and jackets and pants and helmets and, and, and) that really shine on the descent. I am very lucky in that I have Kore 99s and Stormrider 88s from last season (very light weight). With both I feel that I can charge hard, but also scrub speed faster and with more ease, stop quickly faster, and get in and out of tight spots (glades / moguls) with much, much more ease than I used to in heavier boots / on heavier skis. I find they also ski better at slower speeds (when that is what ya need to do). You don't have to be a park rat to appreciate a set up that is easier to toss about (never mind just carrying the stuff from your car!).
 

AngryAnalyst

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+1 for heavy skis in rough snow (especially crud). I can understand why that may not work for older folks though.
 

KingGrump

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+1 for heavy skis in rough snow (especially crud). I can understand why that may not work for older folks though.
I am sure you can understand. However, I believe your understanding is incorrect.
 

Ken_R

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I've often wondered what the weight of my skis/bindings/boots is? particularly when it's all dangling while I ride the chairlift. Anyway, I finally got around to weighing the stuff. My Tecnica Phnx 90 boots are 2338 grams (5 lbs 2.5 oz) each. and my Salomon X-Wing 10 skis with integrated bindings are 6690 grams (7 lbs 6 oz) each. So that is approx 25+ lbs on my feet, dangling.

Seems like a lot, but maybe it's typical, and maybe I shouldn't overthink it.

Anyway, I planning on getting some new gear this fall, so I was wondering if I should be thinking about lighter stuff if possible? Manufacturers are spotty at best about publishing weights.

What's everyone's thoughts?
I am loving lighter weight boots. With skis it depends, lots of factors at play but generally I do like lighter skis if conditions are good but when it gets rough there is nothing like damp, heavier skis.

That said, lighter gear makes the ski experience easier and better in many cases. Walking with boots and skis for example.
 
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