Discovered a fabulous low-light goggle lens

Discussion in 'Softgoods: Clothing, Helmets, Goggles, and More' started by mike_m, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    Do you mean the light looks blue looking through the lens or reflects blue on the outside?

    Don't know the answer. Josh Hamilton had his famous day time hitting problems. That sounds more like quantity of light though.

    -------------------------------Quote
    Hamilton said Wednesday that he has a tougher time seeing the ball because he has blue eyes. An optometrist who talked to ESPNDallas.com on Thursday supports Hamilton's theory and explained why.

    "Because of the lack of pigment in lighter color eyes -- like blue or green eyes as opposed to brown -- you get a lot more unwanted light and that can create glare problems," said Dr. Richard L. Ison, O.D., an optometrist since 1990 who currently works in Murphy, just northeast of Dallas.

    Ison said the phenomenon is called intraocular light scatter, meaning the light scatters as it enters, producing a focal point that isn't as good.

    His solution for Hamilton: Find a pair of sunglasses that he's completely comfortable wearing while batting.
    --------------------------\quote
    http://www.espn.com/dallas/mlb/news/story?id=6696741
     
    AmyPJ and cosmoliu like this.
  2. Coach13

    Coach13 Out on the slopes Skier

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    I’m not sure is pigmentation is the determining factor but it’s obviously different from person to person if in no other area than light sensitivity. With my dark eyes I’m super light sensitive to the point where I wear sunglasses on a brighter but overcast day and in a bluebird ski day have to have the darkest lense I can find. At night, it’s just the opposite, I have to have a lens that illuminates as much as possible.
     
  3. Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    Example:
    My eyes are light green in the center and brown on the outside. I like the blue sensor lens better than the rose or yellow.
    See this pic of the two POC goggles that Phil and I are using with different flat light lenses.
    Phil's on the left is a rose tint, while mine has more of a blue tint.
    POC Flat Light. .JPG
     
  4. James

    James Skiing the powder Instructor

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    You're supposed to also take a pic as you see it looking through.ogsmile ;)

    Well at one time we had most of the Smith lens spectrum transmission graphs posted on epic. I don't see where they're available now.
    The Red Sensor transmits more blue spectrum than the other Sensors. I remember that.
     
  5. headybrew

    headybrew surrender to the flow Skier

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    The darker the pigment in your eyes the LESS light sensitive you should be...
     
    James likes this.


  6. Atomicman

    Atomicman Getting off the lift Skier

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    Exactly, Light eyes like mine are ultra sensitive. Coach must have something else going on.
     
  7. Whiterook

    Whiterook At the base lodge Skier

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    Thanks for this. Needed a new low light lense for my vices. The rose was not working well for me and I usually use low light lenses for all light conditions. I used yellow tint in my squad XLs but don’t think they were the Chromapop. They came a night lenses with the goggles. I preferred them in all light conditions. Just ordered the Choma yellow based on this review and look forward to trying them.
     
  8. Jimski

    Jimski Booting up Skier

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    Just a few hours ago -- before stumbling onto this thread -- I ordered the ChromoPop Everyday Yellow Flash (65% VLT). I got new I/O goggles last season, which came with the ChromPop Sun (9% VLT) for big sun days and the ChromoPop Storm (50% VLT) for low-light days. Like the thread starter, I found that the CP Storm did not really cut it for me on serious flat light days. According to the Smith website, aside from clear lenses (and assuming no error by me), the CP EYF has the highest VLT offered for an IO lens.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2019
  9. AmyPJ

    AmyPJ Let's go! Pugski Ski Tester

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    I have determined after stealing @utskier's Chromapop Storm lens at Targhee this past weekend and letting him use my Prizm Hi Pinks that the Chromapop work MUCH better for me in flat/low light. Lucky us, we have a few Smith goggles laying around so I ordered the Storm lens for a pair of those goggles. I'll continue to use the Oakleys for other light conditions.
     
  10. ARL67

    ARL67 Invisible Airwaves Crackle With Life Skier

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    I was a Smith IOX guy for a couple years, then jumped on the Oakley Flightdeck Prizm band-wagon and have the Rose and Hi-Pink lens. I thought the Hi-Pink was very good in low light, but all this chatter about the Chromapop Yellow caught my attention, so I ordered in the lens for my retired IOX frame. A quick test shows it is much brighter than the Oakley Hi-Pink. Googling reveals that the Smith Yellow has a VLT of 65% vs the Oakley Hi-Pink 35-40%.
     
  11. Whiterook

    Whiterook At the base lodge Skier

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    I've now used the CPEYF about 6-7 times and are certainly the best i've tried for low and regular light fow whati like.
     

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