Clendenin method camps//

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by Codger, Feb 23, 2018.

  1. Mike King

    Mike King AKA Habacomike Instructor

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    Louisville CO/Aspen Snowmass
    Who'd you ski with?
     
  2. Ron

    Ron rebuilding myself one part at a time Pugski Ski Tester

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    @Seldomski are you here in Steamboat with John? I usually see him on the mountain. Good guy.
     
  3. Seldomski

    Seldomski Paralysis by analysis Skier

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    @Ron -- Nope we did two one day privates with one of his minions in Aspen at Ajax mountain. Those bumps are awesome to learn on. John had just left to go to Steamboat while we were there. The coach left I think the next day for Steamboat for the camp.
     
  4. Seldomski

    Seldomski Paralysis by analysis Skier

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    Chino. Great guy, fantastic skier.
     
  5. Seldomski

    Seldomski Paralysis by analysis Skier

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    @LiquidFeet - I found your post in a now closed thread and wanted to pick at it some...this seemed like the best place to do it.

    A lot of what your write here is true of the Clendenin method. There is a lot of similarity between it and Bumps for Boomers, so I'm just going to assume my experience reflects both programs... to a degree.

    I did see some contrary points, specifically regarding separation (i.e. 'staying square to the skis') and applicability to more advanced skiers. During the lesson I was able to show enough skill/progression that the idea of separation was reintroduced. Initially it was taught as stance. Mainly to keep the upper body 45 degrees to the skis, facing downhill. This is sort of a baby step toward separation. Pole plants were also examined, as they contribute to keeping the upper body down the hill. There was even some work on low angle zipper line tactic with the drifted turns. These are not possible without separation. This was a bit of a fail for me, since I wasn't quite ready - but I did accomplish more than I had before. I definitely need more practice to develop the quick feet.

    So, they do teach separation when the student is ready - in the bumps.

    The primary aim is just to get people skiing bumps comfortably - people who are intermediates on groomers. That is the biggest market anyway. At first, it looks like what I would call 'old man bump skiing.' It's not dynamic, the skis are square, but that's not to say it isn't technically difficult for an intermediate. #1 issue I see with others and myself when it comes to getting better is a failure to relax. So just getting someone in that terrain in a relaxed state of mind is an enormous step forward. That is really step 1 to doing anything dynamic in bumps.

    Drift in the bumps enough and your balance naturally gets better. You can't keep sliding in a controlled way if your fore/aft balance and ability to absorb 3D features is out of whack. Your awareness of feet, edges, balance should all improve. So if you do keep at it, you will become ready for the next level. They can teach this also, it's just not as heavily marketed since I think they rarely get first time students ready for it.

    One other note specific to the Clendenin method - they have a skills assessment within the method. CM Certification. Lowest level is really just learning the terminology. Successive levels involve adopting more of the terms and being able to teach it yourself, as well as demoing skills in bumps and some 'stupid human tricks.' They use some funny words for skill demos - I asked what "Park the Car" referred to in the Black certification. It is something like a carved turn to go up hill, followed by drifting in reverse into a 180 to face downhill. Sort of a stop/go 360 that demos you have fine balance skills.

    Most of what is marketed is just the entry tier student skills that are gained. I assume Bumps for Boomers has some other more advanced concepts they introduce to clients that are ready for it. So I wouldn't necessarily write off either program as being useless for more advanced skiers who already are comfortable in easier bumps and want to improve.
     


  6. LiquidFeet

    LiquidFeet Making fresh tracks Instructor

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    Thanks, @Seldomski, for that response.

    I have not attended either camp, so am very interested in first hand observations. I expected all along that my online reading about Bumps for Boomers probably misled me to some inaccurate conclusions. Bumps-for-Boomers does put out a ton of information.

    Clendenin has put some info online as well. He does create some doozies when he makes up terms. Here are some terms created by Clendenin for his program:

    Tip and Tuck
    The Love Spot
    The Epiphany Pad
    The High Heel
    Squeegee
     

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