KingGrump

Most Interesting Man In The World
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I know how they do it: They can see better. I know this because I used to see better. Talked to eye doctor. "Yeah, you're getting old. This happens."
Ask Darwin and he will tell you "Adapt or be eliminated.
We are supposed to get wiser as we age. I guess not everyone participates in that program.
With the infinite wisdom I have accumulated over the years, I would say the solution is not in ever lighter tinted googles. Try challenging your fashion sense instead. Therein lies the solution to your problem.

Blind Sier Vest.jpg
 
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David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
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Ask Darwin and he will tell you "Adapt or be eliminated.
We are supposed to get wiser as we age. I guess not everyone participates in that program.
With the infinite wisdom I have accumulated over the years, I would say the solution is not in ever lighter tinted googles. Try challenging your fashion sense instead. Therein lies the solution to your problem.

View attachment 84804
I tried that in a bar once. For safety I held my hands in front of me about chest high. I got slapped a lot...
 

TheArchitect

Working to improve all the time
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I knew I saved the box so I'd know what my lens was. I dug around and found it -- sure enough, it was the photochromic red sensor. Sad tney don't make them anymore.

But it looks like there might be a "chromapop photochromic rose flash" lens. Not on the Smith site, but does show up in Amazon.
I have the CP photochromic rose flash. I think it works pretty well for my eyes. I don't know how it compares to the previous red sensor. I've switched over all my lenses to CP versions. The CP does make a difference but I wouldn't say it's earth-shattering.
 

Tony S

thread drift a specialty
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Tactile feed back. You are getting warm.
Tactile feedback while skiing works great until your ability to react to it becomes slower in speed or smaller in magnitude than the speed or magnitude of the changes that hit you. If you can see it before it arrives ... totally different story in terms of being prepared. Translation: I want to ski faster than my vision allows. Translation: Grasshopper calls BS.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
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Tactile feedback while skiing works great until your ability to react to it becomes slower in speed or smaller in magnitude than the speed or magnitude of the changes that hit you. If you can see it before it arrives ... totally different story in terms of being prepared. Translation: I want to ski faster than my vision allows. Translation: Grasshopper calls BS.
It works for moderate variations in terrain you know well, or if you are closely following someone who does.
If you don't know the terrain well, you wind up like the people I know who skied off drops (fortunately "only" 5 feet or so) that they did not see. Tactile feedback ain't gonna solve that one.
 

KingGrump

Most Interesting Man In The World
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Translation: I want to ski faster than my vision allows. Translation: Grasshopper calls BS.

I want, I want. I want. Everybody wants. Not many get.
Take a step back and look (pun intended) at what you need and the tools you have to accomplish that need.

Have you ever seen me skied Whistler Bowl in the fog during the gathering? Of course you didn’t. Visibility was so bad, even I didn’t see myself skiing that in the fog. But I felt it. With my skis. Every bump. The trick to the whole thing is, don’t look, feel instead.

If your eyes don’t work. Switch to one or more of you other sensors. You do that every time you walked into a darken room in your own home and the lights won’t come on.
The alternate input sensors will have a much shorter range. The reaction time frame will be much shorter. The take away is “Do not over drive your low beam.”

You have the tools available to you. Use them as designed is the key.

It works for moderate variations in terrain you know well, or if you are closely following someone who does.
If you don't know the terrain well, you wind up like the people I know who skied off drops (fortunately "only" 5 feet or so) that they did not see. Tactile feedback ain't gonna solve that one.
That is not a sensor issue.
That falls under the database and firmware functions. Or is it malfunctions. Could also be a CPU issue.

Translation: You cannot see where you are going. You have no idea what lies ahead. You know it could be potentially dangerous but your survival instinct was not strong enough to keep you from going. Good candidate for the Darwin award.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
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Closely following in bad light is a learned skill. One of the droppers thought he was following an instructor. "That's why I told you to ski right behind me."
 

James

Skiing the powder
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If your eyes don’t work. Switch to one or more of you other sensors. You do that every time you walked into a darken room in your own home and the lights won’t come on.
Well if you walk in a darkened room and your mind starts inventing monsters and Freddy Kruger in the closet, it gets hard to walk.
Also, your own living room is one thing, a strange basement that's totally dark is another. For most it becomes a Blair Witch Project. In a white out one's mind can also wander into bad places. It's good to give it something non destructive to do. Mapping your turn shape, counting, singing. Something.

The conditions of white out have little to do with visually seeing, no matter the age. There's nothing to see. However the invincibility of youth can often be an advantage, if only making the disaster more spectacular.
 

RollingLeaf

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I skied in Austria January-February of this year. It was a real adventure. Definitely a bucket-list item crossed off. On a few cloudy days, my Smith I/OX Chromapop Storm Yellow Flash lenses didn't work as well as expected. I wonder, is there a real difference in light between the Austrian Alps and say, the Rockies? Austria is farther North.
 

James

Skiing the powder
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I wonder, is there a real difference in light between the Austrian Alps and say, the Rockies? Austria is farther North.
The Rockies are higher altitude.
There's a big difference between the east and the Rockies in the US. In VT for example, you could pretty much just have a low light lens. Especially if it has a flash coating, you'll be fine the vast majority of times. Compared to the Rockies, there's nearly 2 miles more atmosphere, and much fewer sunny days.
 
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David

David

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I skied the last couple of days in dead flat light and the fist time skiing since the cloudy film behind my new cataracts has been addressed. My Giro Vivid lens did fine. I have another one that's much lighter but I could see better with the darker Vivid lens!
 

EricG

Lost somewhere!
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. On a few cloudy days, my Smith I/OX Chromapop Storm Yellow Flash lenses didn't work as well as expected.
Try the Chromopop Storm Rose. i have both and like the rose better, especially if it’s snowing and visibility is reduced.

i also find the Chromopop Everyday green has slightly better definition in overcast than the Chromopop Everyday Red even know the VLT of the red is lower than the green.
 
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