surfsnowgirl

Instructor
Skier
Posts
4,387
Location
Londonderry, VT
When I wore goggles I discovered the Oakley Prizm lenses. Prizm rose is too dark for me in Vermont. Had high pink in goggles, which was perfect. I wear windhsckets now with Prizm lenses and so far just have 1 pair.

These do me fine. More for partial and full sun but the prizm technology is so great that these work all the time. If it's full sun I wear sunglasses.

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Likely getting these soon. They have a Prizm rose base but lighter properties so won't be as dark.

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James

Skiing the powder
Instructor
Posts
8,282
Am I the only one with 1/1?
Probably.
I go 0/1 all the time. Meaning I ski with goggles up on the helmet and nothing on the eyes. When things start hitting the eyeballs or it’s really bright or cold then I need something.
(I do this while smoking a cigarette on the way up and vaping on the way down. Too many burn holes when you reverse it.)

I’m probably at 2-4/10-12 but many of those lenses I can’t seem to throw out.Same with the goggles. Straps lose their stretch. Nothing like getting a brand new $100 list lens and the first day hitting a tree ranch and scratching it, or getting a perfect dot scratch right in front of the eyeball.

The reality in Vermont is you basically only need a low light lens.

However, grasshoppers... The simple method for variable conditions is to use a low light goggle lens and in your pocket keep a darker pair of sunglasses. Then when it gets bright you just pull them out of the pocket. You can switch in the same run. Even while moving.

I use the technique at Abasin in May. When it’s really bright you can even put the light goggles over the sunglasses. The sun in May is so strong there that with a magnifying glass you could make a fusion reaction with a snowflake. (Pretty sure that’s a federal crime though)

Anybody see a flaw in this plan?
The description was much too hard to focus on. You’re not really going to take medical advice from us anyway are you?
 
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David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
608
Location
Holland, MI
I haven’t had a chance to test, but I’m guessing they’d be a bit uncomfortable for me. My old HI persimmon goggles were very nearly too light for me on clear days. And according to Oakley, the HI pink is a little bit lighter than the HI persimmon.

If I had a chance, then I’d like to test the HI pink on a sunny day. But for now, I’m pretty happy with the Prizm rose.
My Vivid infrared has a 54 vlt and is only okay if the sun is behind me or I have a visor to keep the sun from hitting my eyes.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
Skier
Posts
3,446
Location
Boston Suburbs
As for goggles, I am currently at 1/1. I really like the photochromic pink Smith chromapop lens that @James made me buy last spring in Vermont.
 

Gary Stolt

Mr. Style
Team Gathermeister
Posts
163
Location
Franklin, KY
As for goggles, I am currently at 1/1. I really like the photochromic pink Smith chromapop lens that @James made me buy last spring in Vermont.
Mike, you are my hero. I followed every word of your eye journey. And I'm looking for new goggles but want 2 lenses that are easily changeable. One lens for flat light and another for flatter light.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
Skier
Posts
3,446
Location
Boston Suburbs
I'm looking for new goggles but want 2 lenses that are easily changeable. One lens for flat light and another for flatter light.
I've had mixed results with the interchangeable lenses on the Smith IO lenses. The first set worked well, but getting the nosepiece tabs properly in-place with the current lens is a big struggle. I'm guessing the dimmensions are ever-so-slightly off from year to year or factory to factory.

I got a TGR email advert (claiming a discount) about a week ago for goggles with a magnetic lens holder. I was going to look into it, but did not get around to it.
 

NE1

Putting on skis
Skier
Posts
98
Location
Central Mass
I got a TGR email advert (claiming a discount) about a week ago for goggles with a magnetic lens holder. I was going to look into it, but did not get around to it.
The Anon magnetic lens interchange system is remarkably easy to use; I have never had an issue with mine, and I change frequently. Buy the hard lens case for your spare to avoid scratching in your pocket or ski bag.
 

LiquidFeet

Making fresh tracks
Instructor
Posts
2,300
Location
New England
Am I the only one with 1/1?....
You are not alone. I have cheap yellow-lens goggles from Costco. They are flat; no bulging spherical lenses for me. They would get scratched up bad on day one. When my cheapos get scratched, I replace them with another pair just like them, cheap and yellow-lensed. I treat my goggles roughly so there's no logic in buying expensive ones.

I can't keep track of two lenses and don't want to take the time to change them so having only one lens is a relief. Yellow works well for New England's gray days with flat light, and they are just fine for the rare sunny days too.
 

LiquidFeet

Making fresh tracks
Instructor
Posts
2,300
Location
New England
....The simple method for variable conditions is to use a low light goggle lens and in your pocket keep a darker pair of sunglasses.....When it’s really bright you can even put the light goggles over the sunglasses....
Never thought of this. Good idea.
 

Jacob

Out on the slopes
Skier
Posts
481
Location
Luton, innit?
You are not alone. I have cheap yellow-lens goggles from Costco. They are flat; no bulging spherical lenses for me. They would get scratched up bad on day one. When my cheapos get scratched, I replace them with another pair just like them, cheap and yellow-lensed. I treat my goggles roughly so there's no logic in buying expensive ones.

I can't keep track of two lenses and don't want to take the time to change them so having only one lens is a relief. Yellow works well for New England's gray days with flat light, and they are just fine for the rare sunny days too.
Another reason I stick with one lens is because, due mainly to the large amount of vertical in a lot of places I ski, there are days when I can see different conditions multiple times a day.

For example, if the clouds are hanging around mid-mountain, I can be constantly going between sunny and cloudy conditions all day long.

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Thread Starter
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David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
608
Location
Holland, MI
Another reason I stick with one lens is because, due mainly to the large amount of vertical in a lot of places I ski, there are days when I can see different conditions multiple times a day.

For example, if the clouds are hanging around mid-mountain, I can be constantly going between sunny and cloudy conditions all day long.

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This is why I'd like to find a photochromic lense that's not grey and will cover everything from dead flat light to bright high altitude sun! I may be asking too much though...
 

dbostedo

Asst. Gathermeister-- Jackson Hole 2020
Moderator
Posts
4,355
Location
Northern Virginia, USA
This is why I'd like to find a photochromic lense that's not grey and will cover everything from dead flat light to bright high altitude sun! I may be asking too much though...
You might want to look at the upcoming Oakley Prizm React... they're electrochromic - electrically adjustable tint of the lens. There's a thread with a good video here: https://www.pugski.com/threads/oakley-prizm-react.16520/
 

Kneale Brownson

Making fresh tracks
Instructor
Posts
1,501
This is why I'd like to find a photochromic lense that's not grey and will cover everything from dead flat light to bright high altitude sun! I may be asking too much though...
The yellow-lensed (is that a word?) Ryders I posted about above amplify contrast in dim light and darken in the sun. Haven't had a chance to use them for skiing yet.
 

LiquidFeet

Making fresh tracks
Instructor
Posts
2,300
Location
New England
The yellow-lensed (is that a word?) Ryders I posted about above amplify contrast in dim light and darken in the sun. Haven't had a chance to use them for skiing yet.
My cheap yellow-lens goggles do what you describe.
I've found them much better at revealing lumps in snow in flat light than any other color lens.
Yellow lenses are better at amplifying contrast in low light than they are in dimming bright sunlight, but they do dim it a little.
My eyes are OK with bright sunlight on snow, so dark goggles aren't necessary on those bright days.
YMMV.
 
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Jacob

Out on the slopes
Skier
Posts
481
Location
Luton, innit?
This is why I'd like to find a photochromic lense that's not grey and will cover everything from dead flat light to bright high altitude sun! I may be asking too much though...
Before I switched to Oakleys, I had a Bolle photochromic lens. But, I found that even on the snowiest of days, it wouldn't stay light. It would get about halfway up to its darkest tint, which was darker than I wanted on those whiteout days.

But I noticed on sunny days that, when I stepped out after lunch with my goggles as light as they could get (before they had time to change), it wasn't uncomfortable for me. So, I decided to just get a light lens and wear it all the time.
 

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