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David

David

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You have to stop trying to see in flat light. You can’t, and you just set up a failure/frustration loop which will drive you crazy.
There are people who ski quite fast in it on piste. Wondering how will get you farther than the perfect lens.
With the film that can develop behind a new cataract lens everything is white. There is no difference between the sky, the ground, a hill, a drop off, pile of snow, a mogul, steep or flat. Some lenses will give better definition than others. With the film fixed I'm hoping to be able to ski again when it's snowing or just not sunny.
 

Henry

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David, when you get a chance, do try different lenses while looking through the window of a shop on a gray day. Oakley Prizm Rose are great goggles, and they aren't the best for my eyes. Dragon Lumalens works much better for my eyes. That says nothing about what will be best for your eyes. Try before you buy. The choice of spherical or cylindrical lens is up to you. I find that I scratch the spherical lens more. Wear your helmet and pick a goggle frame that best fits your face and the helmet.

There's no point getting polarized lenses. Light reflected off snow isn't polarized, so the polarized lens makes no difference except maybe to the cost.
 

Green08

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Oakley Prizm Hi Pink are geared towards flat light even more than the Prizm Rose. But, you would be smart to check out all your enhanced/contrast boosting lens options from the big brands. Find what fits your head and your eyes best and run with that.
 

Jacob

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You have to stop trying to see in flat light. You can’t, and you just set up a failure/frustration loop which will drive you crazy.
I think it's worth clarifying (ha, ha) the difference between flat light and whiteout.

For me, this is flat light and a hilarious example of the dangers it poses.


And this is an example of what I'd call whiteout (due to snowfall, rather than fog).


In flat light, I think a good lens can offer some definition that helps a bit. But in whiteout conditions, there's no point trying to see the ground. Just keep your head up and watch for any solid objects you might be heading towards, like other people.
 
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David

David

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I think it's worth clarifying (ha, ha) the difference between flat light and whiteout.

For me, this is flat light and a hilarious example of the dangers it poses.


And this is an example of what I'd call whiteout (due to snowfall, rather than fog).


In flat light, I think a good lens can offer some definition that helps a bit. But in whiteout conditions, there's no point trying to see the ground. Just keep your head up and watch for any solid objects you might be heading towards, like other people.
My issue is definitely flat light. Whiteout is everyone's issue. But I got the okay to have the film that's developed addressed later thus month. I'm eager to see if I'll have my old vision back or even close would be awesome!
 

Skizoo

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I've been using Haber's optic orange for years and have not come across anything I like better in flat light.
 

dbostedo

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I think it's worth clarifying (ha, ha) the difference between flat light and whiteout.

For me, this is flat light and a hilarious example of the dangers it poses.


And this is an example of what I'd call whiteout (due to snowfall, rather than fog).


In flat light, I think a good lens can offer some definition that helps a bit. But in whiteout conditions, there's no point trying to see the ground. Just keep your head up and watch for any solid objects you might be heading towards, like other people.
Good examples. I had an experience a bit like the first one at Whistler. It was getting to be a bit of a whiteout up top, with flat light down below. I got out of the whiteout onto the groomed, thinking I was just going down a smooth straight hill. But all of the sudden my skis are coming up - there was maybe a 4 or 5 foot roller I didn't even see.

Theoretically, if the light is flat enough (i.e. scattered and perfectly even in every direction from every angle - no shadows at all), your goggles don't matter, because there's nothing for them to do with the light to differentiate the terrain. Usually things aren't quite that flat, but sometimes it's not your goggles that suck - it's just physics.
 

KingGrump

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Good examples. I had an experience a bit like the first one at Whistler. It was getting to be a bit of a whiteout up top, with flat light down below. I got out of the whiteout onto the groomed, thinking I was just going down a smooth straight hill. But all of the sudden my skis are coming up - there was maybe a 4 or 5 foot roller I didn't even see.

Theoretically, if the light is flat enough (i.e. scattered and perfectly even in every direction from every angle - no shadows at all), your goggles don't matter, because there's nothing for them to do with the light to differentiate the terrain. Usually things aren't quite that flat, but sometimes it's not your goggles that suck - it's just physics.
Have to agree about the multitudes of visibility issues at W/B.
They do have some of the best terrain you'll never see.
 
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David

David

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Good examples. I had an experience a bit like the first one at Whistler. It was getting to be a bit of a whiteout up top, with flat light down below. I got out of the whiteout onto the groomed, thinking I was just going down a smooth straight hill. But all of the sudden my skis are coming up - there was maybe a 4 or 5 foot roller I didn't even see.

Theoretically, if the light is flat enough (i.e. scattered and perfectly even in every direction from every angle - no shadows at all), your goggles don't matter, because there's nothing for them to do with the light to differentiate the terrain. Usually things aren't quite that flat, but sometimes it's not your goggles that suck - it's just physics.
I get that but when everyone I'm skiing with can see fine I know it's my eyes. Adding a white film in my eye sure doesn't help on a grey day.
 

James

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I get that but when everyone I'm skiing with can see fine I know it's my eyes. Adding a white film in my eye sure doesn't help on a grey day.
You really ought to consider going to an optometrist who deals wth ski goggles. There used to be a guy on epicski in the Salt Lake area. That area may be your best bet. Plus there's powder there.
 
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David

David

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You really ought to consider going to an optometrist who deals wth ski goggles. There used to be a guy on epicski in the Salt Lake area. That area may be your best bet. Plus there's powder there.
I finally got the okay from my retina specialist to have it fixed! Hoping to be back to 100% clarity but the first flat light day skiing will be the test.
 

Feeling Randy

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Another vote for the Oakley High Intensity ones. I've tried lots of other options, including many Smiths, but I always pull out the Oakleys on storm days. The only challenge is if the sun comes out, I need to go get a different goggle - HI lenses are really bright in the sun.
 
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David

David

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So I saw my eye doc yesterday to fix the film in my eyes. He didn't want to do it because it wasn't affecting my vision when reading the eye chart. I explained the issue several times and he still didn't see the need. I told him that with my retina specialist's approval if he didn't do it another doc would. Well he did one eye and the other is in 2 weeks.

After 24 hours the difference between each eye is drastic! The eye he did is so much brighter I can't believe it! I'm even more excited for ski season now!
 
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David

David

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You can lie, you know. ...
Yah but the pictures of my retina improvement don't. I did embellish the issue on snow but he doesn't ski so to him it was a non-issue. Turns out I wasn't embellishing as much as I thought !!!
 

Kneale Brownson

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I got to try on some Ryder goggles at a bike shop in Michigan the other day, and have placed an order for photochromatic and fog free lens frames like these:



The frames I tried on lacked the foam these have, but had the same lenses. I could see quite clearly with my one "fixed" good eye outside the shop on a gray day, so I think they'll work for low-light days.
 

Ecimmortal

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As a long time Hi-yellow adherent I can confidently say that if it's still you're top suggestion, then you need to try Prizm or Chromapop lenses. Hi-yellow is obsolete.
 

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