Thread Starter
David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
603
Location
Holland, MI
I checked, my Oakley are the Air Brake XL with Hi Pink and Sapphire Iridium. Although darker, I was amazed how versatile the latter were on mixed days. I still want to try those Smith Storm Yellow on a snow puking day! The IOX does feel smaller than the Air Brake.
Before I bought my Giro's I bought the IOX based on reviews and a friend but they didn't even cover both eye sockets. As big as they are I'm not sure why the don't offer a wider goggle.
 

BC.

NEPA ShopRat/Skier
Skier
Posts
742
Location
Lake Wallenpaupack, PA
Oakley HI Yellow had been the best “I’ve/my eyes” have ever used on storm days/challenging visibility.....gave them up to a friend who was having trouble on a trip up to Whiteface.

I’ve been using Smith IOX the past few years..and use blue lens and its fine (not quite as good as HI Yellow)....but I’d be interested in trying out their Storm Yellow to do a direct comparison of the yellow lenses.

What works best is totally up to each individuals eyes/vision.......but people seem to have pretty good luck with the Oakleys and Smiths of the world.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
Skier
Posts
3,418
Location
Boston Suburbs
I have some odd Smith lenses -- a pink photochromic Chromopop -- that I bought by accident. (I was with @James in a store after skiing, they were the last IO lens they had, and he suggested to the store that it was stupid not to discount them heavily.) I wound up really liking them, and use them al the time. Very high VLT when not UV-activated, and nice and dark when they are.

My only complaint is that the Smith IO frame is so difficult to get the nose-tabs to seat properly in the frame that you smudge the lenses before you ever use them. Linen optician gloves next time!
 
Thread Starter
David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
603
Location
Holland, MI
What works best is totally up to each individuals eyes/vision.......but people seem to have pretty good luck with the Oakleys and Smiths of the world.
I've been doing some research onl8ne too and I'm finding the Oakley Prizm, Smith Chromopop & Giro Vivid are the top 3 with very similar technology. Which one is best for anyone is personal preference. Sounds like I'll have to wait for snow so I can take my Vivid's with me to a local shop and compare side by side.
 

BC.

NEPA ShopRat/Skier
Skier
Posts
742
Location
Lake Wallenpaupack, PA
I've been doing some research onl8ne too and I'm finding the Oakley Prizm, Smith Chromopop & Giro Vivid are the top 3 with very similar technology. Which one is best for anyone is personal preference. Sounds like I'll have to wait for snow so I can take my Vivid's with me to a local shop and compare side by side.
What sucks is that even testing different brands in a shop you never really get to “see” how they will perform in a storm or low vis conditions. The only place to really “see” if a lens works is to try out a bunch of pairs at Grand Targhee or Vail’s back bowls in a whiteout storm....lol

On storm days...goggle companies should have demo tents to try out their different lenses....lol
 

Aquila

Booting up
Skier
Posts
5
Location
New Zealand
What sucks is that even testing different brands in a shop you never really get to “see” how they will perform in a storm or low vis conditions. The only place to really “see” if a lens works is to try out a bunch of pairs at Grand Targhee or Vail’s back bowls in a whiteout storm....lol

On storm days...goggle companies should have demo tents to try out their different lenses....lol
Lens demos, love it! I've had a great time with my Smith Blue Sensor Mirror in flat light conditions - I've skied in a lot of crappy lighting conditions and it's become my favourite lens because of that - unfortunately the lens is discontinued so if I ever need to replace it I'm not sure what I'll do. I suppose one of the Chromapop Storm lenses, I've heard good things about the Yellow Flash. Just need to demo it :)
 

socalgal

Out on the slopes
Skier
Posts
537
What sucks is that even testing different brands in a shop you never really get to “see” how they will perform in a storm or low vis conditions. The only place to really “see” if a lens works is to try out a bunch of pairs at Grand Targhee or Vail’s back bowls in a whiteout storm....lol

On storm days...goggle companies should have demo tents to try out their different lenses....lol
Oakley has done that every spring at Mammoth. You give them your DL and take a pair of goggles for a few runs.
 
Thread Starter
David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
603
Location
Holland, MI
Oakley has done that every spring at Mammoth. You give them your DL and take a pair of goggles for a few runs.
They should do that all over!
 

Kneale Brownson

Out on the slopes
Instructor
Posts
1,495
Last year I purchased the Giro Vivid Infrared lens with a 58% VLT specificity for flat light but it didn't help. What lens have you found to work best in flat light?

I had cataract surgery in 2018 and I have developed a thin cloudy film behind the new lens that they cannot repair without damaging my already stressed retinas. In sun or bright light I can see absolutely fine but in cloudy or overcast light everything is just white with no conture at all. Last spring I was above tree line on a flat day and had serious trouble just getting down. And here in the midwest we don't get many sunny days in the winter.
I'm in the middle of cataract surgery (one done, second scheduled in October), and I saw the surgeon the other day for a followup on the first one. I asked her about your film forming behind the implanted lens, and she said it was a common issue that is easily and quickly addressed with a laser. You need to find someone different to look into the filming.
 

Scrundy

I like beer
Skier
Posts
361
Location
Conklin NY
Another vote Hi Intensity yellow....
Been using for years night skiing mostly but also like very much day skiing. Grabbed a pair last year that were not and will be buying another Oakley Hi Vis yellow this year, really missed them.
 
Thread Starter
David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
603
Location
Holland, MI
Another vote Hi Intensity yellow....
Been using for years night skiing mostly but also like very much day skiing. Grabbed a pair last year that were not and will be buying another Oakley Hi Vis yellow this year, really missed them.
I have a couple low light lenses that I can use for night skiing but with the shadows I never have an issue then.
 
Thread Starter
David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
603
Location
Holland, MI
I'm in the middle of cataract surgery (one done, second scheduled in October), and I saw the surgeon the other day for a followup on the first one. I asked her about your film forming behind the implanted lens, and she said it was a common issue that is easily and quickly addressed with a laser. You need to find someone different to look into the filming.
It is easily addressed with normal healthy eyes. The laser causes the retina to swell for a short time until it goes back to normal. But I'm getting monthly injections to address retinopathy (swollen retinas) so my optometrist and retinal specialist say it's absolutely not worth the risk of further damage. They won't allow it until I need it just to live. I've had several other docs tell me the same thing. They all say only ski on sunny days. Jn CO that may not be a big deal but here in the midwest we only get a handful of sunny days and rarely on the weekend.
 

Kneale Brownson

Out on the slopes
Instructor
Posts
1,495
I hope you meant ophthalmologist. I'm fully familiar with midwest skiing. That's where I skied the first 63 years of my skiing experience.


It is easily addressed with normal healthy eyes. The laser causes the retina to swell for a short time until it goes back to normal. But I'm getting monthly injections to address retinopathy (swollen retinas) so my optometrist and retinal specialist say it's absolutely not worth the risk of further damage. They won't allow it until I need it just to live. I've had several other docs tell me the same thing. They all say only ski on sunny days. Jn CO that may not be a big deal but here in the midwest we only get a handful of sunny days and rarely on the weekend.
 
Thread Starter
David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
603
Location
Holland, MI
I hope you meant ophthalmologist. I'm fully familiar with midwest skiing. That's where I skied the first 63 years of my skiing experience.
Yup. Fat fingers & small keys so I use auto finish/correct a lot. Sometimes I have no idea where they get words from.
 
Thread Starter
David

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
Skier
Posts
603
Location
Holland, MI
WooHoo! My retina specialist gave me the all clear to have the film behind my cataract lenses lasered out! I may be good in flat light again! Come on Winter!!!
 

lone pine

Booting up
Skier
Posts
62
Location
Southport, NC
I'm halfway through cataract surgery as well, with the second one coming up next week. I have expectations of much better success in flat light. In the Alps a couple of years ago it was a real issue for me.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
Skier
Posts
3,418
Location
Boston Suburbs
I'm halfway through cataract surgery as well, with the second one coming up next week. I have expectations of much better success in flat light. In the Alps a couple of years ago it was a real issue for me.
I had it done in my worst eye last year. It helps a lot but it ain''t magic. Flat light is still a bear, just not as big a bear.
 

James

Skiing the powder
Instructor
Posts
8,173
You have to stop trying to see in flat light. You can’t, and you just set up a failure/frustration loop which will drive you crazy.
There are people who ski quite fast in it on piste. Wondering how will get you farther than the perfect lens.
 

Advertisement

Top