Bear Mauling and other Bear Stories

Sibhusky

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oldschoolskier

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Waiting to hear if this is someone we know:

KRTV Great Falls News: Whitefish man attacked by bear near Columbia Falls.
https://krtv.com/news/montana-and-regional-news/2018/11/11/whitefish-man-attacked-by-bear-near-columbia-falls/

That's 2.9 miles as the crow flies from where my husband was attacked.

Not much info yet. Of course, maybe he'll feel the same as my husband about having his name in the papers.
It does show despite being armed (likely for big game so something large enough to dispatch the bear) you can still get attacked and be on the receiving end.

Note I didn’t say gun because a bow is possible so I won’t assume.

I was surprised that they didn’t indicated if the hunter(s) killed the bear and that they where investigating.

Personally, if I recall your husband wasn’t armed and this made his outcome very lucky.

Be safe out there.
 

headybrew

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I've always assumed hunters were at much greater risk of being attacked as the best strategy to bag an elk is to read a bear safety manual and then do the opposite. Walk silently through the woods, avoid spreading your scent, use terrain features to hide your silhouette, etc.
 

Sibhusky

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oldschoolskier

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The long version.
Daily Inter Lake: Local News, Local man describes Sunday's bear attack.
https://www.dailyinterlake.com/local_news/20181113/local_man_describes_sundays_bear_attack

The guy had a gun, couldn't get it off his shoulder before he was down. No mention of bear spray. (The first time hunter with him is finished wth hunting for the year..)
Thanks @Sibhusky for the update.

I’m going to reply as a hunter on the article.

In all my years of hunting there is one thing that I would never ever do!!!! Go through thick bush with the gun on my shoulder (for those that don’t understand this term, it means that the gun is hung by the shoulder strap on the back). There are several reasons for this, safety!!!!!, if gun is loaded (round in chamber which in hunting ussually is) one might snag the trigger and shoot ones self :eek:. Second, this one is so obvious even none gun owners should see it, you get hung up in thick bush ( try going through thick with your arms stretched out)!!!!! There are more but this covers the most obvious.


In bear country the smart hunter would be somewhat cautious, considering the above obvious observations, so while I sympathize with what happened, IMHO something about this story sounds like a fishy tale.

While we have a difference of opinion on guns, of the two instances your husband had significantly more sense in self preservation compared to the hunters.
 

Talisman

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The guy had a gun, couldn't get it off his shoulder before he was down. No mention of bear spray. (The first time hunter with him is finished with hunting for the year..)
I have read this before, where the bear closed too fast to get the rifle unslung or even sighted before being on the ground. During the warm months I carry bear spray where it ready even while hunting. Since most elk and mule deer around here are taken with long shots, telescopic sights are commonly used and not ideal for close quarters.
 

oldschoolskier

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I have read this before, where the bear closed too fast to get the rifle unslung or even sighted before being on the ground. During the warm months I carry bear spray where it ready even while hunting. Since most elk and mule deer around here are taken with long shots, telescopic sights are commonly used and not ideal for close quarters.
First of all in heavy bush why would you carry the gun by the sling, I sure as hell don’t (just from a safety stand point alone). Second I do use a scope, however at really close range just point and shot from the hip, you are close enough to make it count.

Come on it’s not that difficult. I suspect that the real truth is not being fully told.

As to carrying both at the ready you are setting yourself up for disaster. Pick one or the other and stick with it.

If you are hunting, be the hunter.
 
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Talisman

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First of all in heavy bush why would you carry the gun by the sling, I sure as hell don’t (just from a safety stand point alone). Second I do use a scope, however at really close range just point and shot from the hip, you are close enough to make it count.

Come on it’s not that difficult. I suspect that the real truth is not being fully told.

As to carrying both at the ready you are setting yourself up for disaster. Pick one or the other and stick with it.
Have you ever been in grizzly bear country hiking or hunting? A hip shot on a charging sow or boar grizzly that doesn't hit a vital organ isn't going to help much. Bear spray works and a direct hit isn't required.
 

Sibhusky

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Exactly. 35 mph is 51 FEET PER SEC. The bear won't even feel the shot until it is already on you. Literally. Everyone always imagines that they'll see the bear coming. They MIGHT hear it coming, they might even think "bear!". But aim at a vital, charge stopping spot? Unlikely. The bear might not even feel the shot for a moment or two. Spray, even misdirected, gets in eyes, nose, mouth of the bear and probably even the human spraying it (not fun) and that person's companions. (It'll hurt for days if you're the human, and make your skin swell. It'll get on the nurses if they don't wear gloves when taking your blood pressure as it gets released from your skin cells.) The bear is going to want to leave the area rapidly. Sure, take a shot at him as he leaves. Much more useful.
 

oldschoolskier

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If load size and aiming is a concern and you want knock down power, Holland and Holland Double Barrel Rifle in a 500 Nitro Express, still worried up it to a 700 Nitro Express.

Not convinced, both are elephant/rhino loads, meant to stop them in there tracks, a lot tougher than a tiny grizzly. Hit anything of the grizzly it is a vital hit.

In reality hunting like skiing requires practice and skills development (along with skills maintenance). Unfortunately in hunting (above is an exception) very few actually practice any where near close enough. So yes what you mention does cause issue.

Bear spray I will agree for those (unfortunately majority of hunters) is definitely very effective shotgun approach.
 

Talisman

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Bear spray I will agree for those (unfortunately majority of hunters) is definitely very effective shotgun approach.
Even if you are toting enough firepower and have the aim to stop a grizzly, there are times when the weapon is slung and the bear spray is handy. Answering the call of nature or crossing wire fences are examples where the weapon isn't in hand. Maybe I should buy a 50 caliber Desert Eagle?
 

noncrazycanuck

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I've seen a grizzly in full attack mode.
it's very unlikely anything will stop it before impact - your best hope is it loses interest it afterward.
Getting covered with spray is more appealing to me than playing dead while being pawed about.
although I certainly would appreciate someone else shooting the bear (provided they missed me)

CBC just reported a woman and baby were killed by Grizzly outside their remote Yukon home
Bear was later killed by husband when he returned from his trap line.
Suspect both were as bear aware as you possibly can be.
 

oldschoolskier

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I've seen a grizzly in full attack mode.
it's very unlikely anything will stop it before impact - your best hope is it loses interest it afterward.
Getting covered with spray is more appealing to me than playing dead while being pawed about.
although I certainly would appreciate someone else shooting the bear (provided they missed me)

CBC just reported a woman and baby were killed by Grizzly outside their remote Yukon home
Bear was later killed by husband when he returned from his trap line.
Suspect both were as bear aware as you possibly can be.
Just saw it as well. My heart goes out the family. No matter our discussion (bickering) here, it still happens with the biggest factor being luck that you survive an encounter despite all best efforts no matter what they are.

Comes down to three simple yet critical words:

Awareness
Preparedness
Luck

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/woman-10-month-old-daughter-killed-by-bear-at-remote-yukon-cabin/ar-BBQ9Wbd?ocid=spartandhp
 

Jenny

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They make this sound more benign than what @Sibhusky's husband and the medical workers went through in regards to the remaining bear spray, yet there's also one person in critical condition. Are there different kinds? (Sorry if that's a dumb question - this is totally out of my experience.)

https://slate.com/business/2018/12/amazon-workers-hospitalized-robot-punctures-bear-repellent-spray.html

24 Amazon Warehouse Workers Sent to Hospital After Robot Punctures Can of Bear Repellent Spray

About 80 workers at an Amazon warehouse in Robbinsville Township, New Jersey, reported difficulty breathing after a robot inadvertently punctured a 9-ounce can of bear repellent spray on Wednesday. Local hospitals are treating 24 of those workers, including one who is in critical condition. The workers are expected to be discharged within 24 hours.

The incident occurred in the morning in the south wing of the warehouse. The 1.3-million-square-foot facility was not evacuated, though the immediate area was cleared. First responders treated about 30 people at the scene.

Bear spray is a nonlethal repellant that inhibits breathing and sight by causing swelling in the membranes of the nose, eyes, and lungs. The substance contains capsaicin, a chili extract that’s also used in pepper spray. The effects typically dissipate in 45 minutes.

“Today at our Robbinsville fulfillment center, a damaged aerosol can dispensed strong fumes in a contained area of the facility. The safety of our employees is our top priority, and as such, all employees in that area have been relocated to safe place and employees experiencing symptoms are being treated onsite,” Amazon told ABC News. “As a precaution, some employees have been transported to local hospitals for evaluation and treatment.” The company says it plans to conduct a full investigation into the incident.
 

oldschoolskier

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They make this sound more benign than what @Sibhusky's husband and the medical workers went through in regards to the remaining bear spray, yet there's also one person in critical condition. Are there different kinds? (Sorry if that's a dumb question - this is totally out of my experience.)

https://slate.com/business/2018/12/amazon-workers-hospitalized-robot-punctures-bear-repellent-spray.html

24 Amazon Warehouse Workers Sent to Hospital After Robot Punctures Can of Bear Repellent Spray

About 80 workers at an Amazon warehouse in Robbinsville Township, New Jersey, reported difficulty breathing after a robot inadvertently punctured a 9-ounce can of bear repellent spray on Wednesday. Local hospitals are treating 24 of those workers, including one who is in critical condition. The workers are expected to be discharged within 24 hours.

The incident occurred in the morning in the south wing of the warehouse. The 1.3-million-square-foot facility was not evacuated, though the immediate area was cleared. First responders treated about 30 people at the scene.

Bear spray is a nonlethal repellant that inhibits breathing and sight by causing swelling in the membranes of the nose, eyes, and lungs. The substance contains capsaicin, a chili extract that’s also used in pepper spray. The effects typically dissipate in 45 minutes.

“Today at our Robbinsville fulfillment center, a damaged aerosol can dispensed strong fumes in a contained area of the facility. The safety of our employees is our top priority, and as such, all employees in that area have been relocated to safe place and employees experiencing symptoms are being treated onsite,” Amazon told ABC News. “As a precaution, some employees have been transported to local hospitals for evaluation and treatment.” The company says it plans to conduct a full investigation into the incident.
The robot thought a bear was present so it took appropriate action, unfortunately the workers didn’t see the danger in time and got sprayed. This is the unofficial quote from an unofficial non-exist Amazon nonspokes person.
 

SShore

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Not a bear mauling story but my daughter had a scary encounter this weekend. She was leading a college backcountry trip on Friday that was suppose to be out until Sunday evening. The were about halfway up a four hour climb to h hut with her in the front. She saw some eyes reflecting from her headlamp up in front of her. Thinking bear she stopped and started talking in a loud voice. The eyes didn’t move. One of the guys on the trip behind her said it was probably a deer and moved up a bit ant that is when the Mountain lion moved out of sight a bit. She and the profgrm head decided it best to turn around. Figuring the lion had a dear stashed in the gully they were traveling up. Ok the way out she was up front with the other leader in the back. A couple of the split boarders with them kept falling on the way down slowing their retreat. The guy on the back said he say the lion follow them the entire way down.

It is a good thing there was a fairly large group (six of them) and that they all stayed together. She got home late but said she was so shaken, more from the lion following them than running into it in the first place, she didn’t sleep all night
 

oldschoolskier

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Not a bear mauling story but my daughter had a scary encounter this weekend. She was leading a college backcountry trip on Friday that was suppose to be out until Sunday evening. The were about halfway up a four hour climb to h hut with her in the front. She saw some eyes reflecting from her headlamp up in front of her. Thinking bear she stopped and started talking in a loud voice. The eyes didn’t move. One of the guys on the trip behind her said it was probably a deer and moved up a bit ant that is when the Mountain lion moved out of sight a bit. She and the profgrm head decided it best to turn around. Figuring the lion had a dear stashed in the gully they were traveling up. Ok the way out she was up front with the other leader in the back. A couple of the split boarders with them kept falling on the way down slowing their retreat. The guy on the back said he say the lion follow them the entire way down.

It is a good thing there was a fairly large group (six of them) and that they all stayed together. She got home late but said she was so shaken, more from the lion following them than running into it in the first place, she didn’t sleep all night
There is a book called “Don’t get Eaten” (yes i’ve posted this before).

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5002-037/Don't-Get-Eaten?colour=NOC02&gclid=EAIaIQobChMItv7LhrqP4AIVC4hpCh3rNgHxEAQYAiABEgJRm_D_BwE

Honestly, I bought it because it looked like funny title, but the information contained is great, shows you all the things done wrong in various situations and more importantly what to do right.

For those that adventure in these areas should be a must read, for everyone else a should read.

Cheap ounce of protection.
 

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