Featured Sponsored 6 Tips for Staying Safe in the Backcountry

Discussion in 'Chairlift Chat' started by SkiEssentials, Dec 14, 2018.

  1. SkiEssentials

    SkiEssentials Slashing Turns and Prices Pugski Sponsor

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    [​IMG]
    This week on Chairlift Chat Jake walks you through his 6 tips for staying safe when venturing into the backcountry. This is not intended to be an end all/tell all guide to backcountry skiing, just some reminders to keep you safe. We encourage anyone interested in backcountry skiing to seek our local classes on backcountry and avalanche safety.
     
    Ken_R and Coach13 like this.
  2. pais alto

    pais alto me encanta el país alto Skier

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    7. Take CPR
     
    Mendieta, ZionPow, Slim and 1 other person like this.
  3. Thread Starter
    TS
    SkiEssentials

    SkiEssentials Slashing Turns and Prices Pugski Sponsor

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    Totally! I actually ski with a pretty extensive medical kit now when going out in the BC. Takes up a big portion of my pack, but I like feeling prepared for as many situations as I can be.
     
    pais alto likes this.
  4. Slim

    Slim Getting off the lift Skier

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    A few corrections:
    • The online avalanche course should be done as prep before a live course, not instead of one.
    • Heat loss through your head is not greater than the rest of your body (https://www.livescience.com/34411-body-heat-loss-head.html)
    • Because of that, an ultralight down vest(3oz) is a much better protection from hypothermia than a wool hat (2 oz). That isn’t to say that it’s a bad idea to bring more than one piece of headwear.
    • Letting toes and fingers get cold, does not result in your core body temperature dropping, the body effectively protects the core by shutting off blood flow to the extremities. However, near-frozen fingers severly hamper your ability to perform any task.
    • Heat packs are not a lightweight option for staying warm. They are quit heavy for their size, and only last a few hours. They are useful to keep toes and fingers warm, but nearly useless to prevent hypothermia.
    • You mention “preparing for the worst”, but even “preparing for a slight mishap” would include some form of shelter. Anyone who has ever been active outside and come to a stop knows how cold you get once you are stationary. Everyone should carry some form of shelter:
    • (emergency)Bivy-sack
    • Bothy-bag (https://www.terra-nova.co.uk/p/8-uses-for-a-bothy-bag/)
    • Or (ultralight tarp)Tent (https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/product/duomid/)
     
  5. pais alto

    pais alto me encanta el país alto Skier

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    ^This, and Get A(n Experienced) Mentor.
     


  6. François Pugh

    François Pugh Out on the slopes Skier

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    Those are pretty good rules.
    I don't feel at all guilty violating 1 and 2. I like solitude, and sometimes it's nice to be able to do stuff on the spur of the moment. Yes, I'll accept the added risk and won't wine if I have to pay the piper.

    I'll add always know where you are, where you're going and how to navigate back home (i.e. don't get lost).
     
  7. ella_g

    ella_g Getting off the lift Skier

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    Back up phone charger!

    This medical kit isn’t tiny but I’d rather have stuff than not have it and nice to not have to put together your own, & random things have come in handy ...
    12829139-0FC7-4F71-9989-683B9D6D784D.jpeg
    Also, if venturing into the backcountry with kids, playing cards. Takes up so little space in a pack & u never know what situation you might encounter which takes time and kids can stay entertained with cards forever without bugging you.
     

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