jmills115

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Posts
522
Location
Salt Lake City, Utah
Can someone "school" me on trigger ski poles. I get annoyed with straps and don't use them half/most of the time. I've contemplated getting a pair of the Scott strapless ski poles but then I'm also very intrigued by the Leki setup where your glove snaps into the the pole handle. Is there more than one kind, can someone recommend a model to me. I think I want the Trigger S but I thought I'd ask the experts.
I bought a new Trigger S after seeing it on a local classified (KSL) for $30 yesterday. I knew nothing about them before this thread. Thank you.
 

NZRob

Skiing the Rock
Skier
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Posts
311
Location
New Zealand
Here was me thinking my 18 year old VIST poles were old. I will be getting Leki triggers (yes they are compatible with any glove/mitten, and are fantastic) as soon as the VISTs die. Which at this rate will be never.
 

ian k

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Posts
2
Location
new hampshire
With this you can make your leki poles last even longer. They bump your poles up a size so your poles can grow with you. They are easily stackable and stronger than the original pole while still staying very light.
https://www.racepolestretcher.com/
I have had on mine for 2 years now and they work perfectly. People cannot even tell that they are there. Another thing is if you are a racer and your poles get mixed up with other people’s they are very recognizable. When everyone leaves their poles at the bottom to pull gates I am normally the first one to find my poles out of the pile.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
3,698
Location
Boston Suburbs
My Scott ski poles are the only poles I've ever owned. I'm only thinking about getting new ones because the current thinking is that the old sizing rules are no longer valid.
I probably bought them in 1982 or 1983 - so about 35 years old.
They are the better 7075 aluminum alloy, not the more typical 6000 series alloys. They were expensive when I bought them, but I guess I've gotten my money's worth.
My poles finally wore out last year, and I now have new composite ones. They made the decision to update for me.
 

martyg

Out on the slopes
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
720
Why LEKI poles are so strong - and stronger than every other pole out there:

- Every other brand / factory (and many brands come out of a very few factories - with the brands being marketing entities - and not manufacturing entities) purchases raw alloy tube stock that is ordered as heat treated.
- They then take the tube stock, cut to length, and swags the blanks in a machine to taper them. The process of swaging (one "g") induces heat. That heat compromises the heat treating in the blank. This compromises the structural integrity of the tapered section.

LEKI, on the other hand:

- Orders alloy tube stock.
- Cuts to length, and swags.
- They have their own in-house heat treating. Only a few employees are allowed in that facility. And it is only the employees who are directly involved with the heat treating process and QA.
- The strength of the tapered section is never affected by this process. The shaft is universally strong throughout.

The other thing that makes LEKI unique: the factory is vertically integrated. All injection molding also takes place in the home plant. It is not something that is contracted out. That leads to awesome in-line and end-of-line QA.

The one part of LEKI poles that is contracted out: the carbon shafts. And that factory is dialed.
 

martyg

Out on the slopes
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
720
Can someone "school" me on trigger ski poles. I get annoyed with straps and don't use them half/most of the time. I've contemplated getting a pair of the Scott strapless ski poles but then I'm also very intrigued by the Leki setup where your glove snaps into the the pole handle. Is there more than one kind, can someone recommend a model to me. I think I want the Trigger S but I thought I'd ask the experts.
Triggers are much quicker than straps, both on and off. In teaching it allows me to ransition quicker. I also use LEKI gloves, with the point of attachment integrated into the glove - no accessory strap on the glove.
 

Brian Finch

PT, CSCS, Cert- DN, FRCms, M|WOD Coach
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 17, 2015
Posts
2,053
Location
Vermont
Bring a pot of water to a boil. Let cool a bit. Submerge grips. They will slide off with a bit of force.
I did that & more & could not get em off. Ended up giving the poles away to a junior racer.
 

crgildart

Gravity Slave
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
7,119
Location
The Bull City
I've got some rebadged Kermas that have been in use since 1982. The leather straps are probably not going to last forever, but everything else, including the snap out strap mechanisms are still 100% bomb proof.
 
Thread Starter
TS
Eric Edelstein

Eric Edelstein

ExoticSkis
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 18, 2015
Posts
155
Location
Vermont and France
Triggers are much quicker than straps, both on and off. In teaching it allows me to ransition quicker. I also use LEKI gloves, with the point of attachment integrated into the glove - no accessory strap on the glove.
Stay tuned...a little bird told me there may be a new Trigger Grip design landing soon....

I love the Triggers, but prefer the over-the-glove hook harness over the Leki built-in-the-glove loops...the wraparound strap feels like I am more securely hunkered-down in the grip when attached...


DSC02972.JPG

Leki Glove with built-in hook loop​

DSC02971.JPG

Over-the-glove strap with hook loop (left)​

(Don't ask about how I understand bird-talk....it's a long story...)
 
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