2018 Cycling sunglasses

Discussion in 'Cycling: Mountain, Road, Uni and E-Bike' started by Plai, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. Plai

    Plai Paul Lai Skier

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    This forum needs a cycling sunglasses thread. (Especially now since I'm on a the hunt for a new style. ;-)

    I'm been partial to Smith Optics (Mavericks) and Costa del Mar (Brine) -- amber tint. I started using them about 15+ years ago for flyfishing due to the good optics, polarization, and durability. The only ones I've replaced have been my fails.

    But, the full frame, weight and slightly lower light transmission don't work well with cycling (MTB and road).

    My biking (road & mtb) seems to be in the early mornings, and often under tree cover (mostly mtb) or cloud cover (mtb & road). I find myself wanting lighter frames and almost frameless, yellow or rose lenses for more light transmission.

    So, what works for you? How did you decide what you liked? How can I minimize my time in the shop trying on sunglasses?
     
  2. fatbob

    fatbob Out on the slopes Skier

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    Reserves place in thread where people soon claim if you aren't running $500 sunnies you are seriously compromising your cycling experience......
     
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  3. scott43

    scott43 Making fresh tracks Skier

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    MEC . $32. Done. Orange and grey lenses.
     
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  4. surfacehoar

    surfacehoar Booting up Skier

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    I wear Oakley eyeshades.

    I have an original pair from the 80's that are black with the grey lenses (the oldest belonging I own and use) I also have the new anniversary edition with the iridium lens. The grey lens is better for low light.

    Last week a kid says, "Dad, is he wearing ski goggles?" When I rode by. Dad says, "No son, those are special cycling glasses. " People either love them and give me high fives, or hate them and think i'm a tool. I do wear them skiing every chance I get.

    They feel cheap and fragile but I haven't broken them yet. I don't have fogging issues and they do a great job of keeping wind out of my eyes.

    Would recommend.
     
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  5. cantunamunch

    cantunamunch Meh Skier

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    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
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  6. JeffB

    JeffB Refilling the flask Skier

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    I’ve had good luck with Tifosi. Not terribly expensive, don’t typically have a fogging problem, and you can get a transition lens that is almost completely clear in the dark. I use that lens for our weekday group rides that leave before sunrise. Would probably work well in the woods too.

    Edited to add: I looked It up, and it’s the fototech lens.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
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  7. Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    I have some (I think) 12 year old Smith Factor Max sunglasses with 4 different lenses.
    I like these for riding because the bow is slim and flat so that it goes under the helmet nicely, and its nice to change the lens to the lighter one when I know I'll be in a lot of trees, or darker one when I know I'll be riding in a lot of sunlight.
    I got these on Steep and Cheap for something like 60.00 back then. MSRP was 120.00(ish)
    The current version of these is the Parallel Max. $139.00 I think the new version comes with 2 or three different lenses instead of 4.
    Here are mine.
    IMG_0439.jpeg
     
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  8. scott43

    scott43 Making fresh tracks Skier

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  9. coskigirl

    coskigirl Making fresh tracks Skier

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  10. luliski

    luliski Out on the slopes Skier

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    I've used the Smith Parallel Max (lost), Oakleys (can't remember the model but they broke), another Smith (more of a "lifestyle frame, but they work), and a few pair of Tifosi's. I had some with lenses that changed as the light changed. I'm too tired to remember what that's called, but it didn't work that well. Tifosis have been the best and they're not expensive.
     
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  11. Primoz

    Primoz Out on the slopes Skier

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    Even though I still say that Oakley are overpriced piece of sh**t (after Luxotica bought Oakley, as before they were really great quality), but I just like them :) For pretty much any sport except alpine skiing (xc skiing, ski touring (up of course), mtb, running...) I really like Oakley Radar, and even though I said it's just marketing hype, their Prizm lenses work pretty good, but at least with Prizm Trail you need to get used to it, as on beginning it feels really weird when riding on trails that are in shade but sun comes through leaves on certain places. Prizm Trail is pretty light, but I always used light lenses, and when you get to spot where most of it is in shadow but parts have sun light, those bright spots feel like burned out (nowhere near like this with G30 lens). But once you get used to that, it's really cool lens with all the contrast and riding mtb in forest feels so much better then with my old G30 lenses.
     
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  12. trailtrimmer

    trailtrimmer Stuck in the Flatlands Skier

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    I have a pair of Oakley racing jackets/jawbones that never fog unless it's well below freezing and I stop moving. The lens clarity is awesome and you can buy parts or factory will fix them. The orange iridium fire lens is nice enough to transition from riding in the woods to on the road in full sun in my climate. I'm guessing I've had them for 7-8 years now, replaced the lenses once, my own doing from too much saw work wearing my good glasses and not the cheapies.
     
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  13. davjr96

    davjr96 Putting on skis Skier

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    I finally upgraded from my $7 glasses that were falling apart and had scratches over the eye to some Oakley Crossrange's. Should arrive soon. I was able to customize them on their site and went for a middle ground prizm lense so I can hopefully use them for MTB, ski touring, and just walking around. The swappable parts really appealed to me.
     
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  14. cantunamunch

    cantunamunch Meh Skier

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    PSA: Scattante Echelon photochromics on sale at Nashbar under $20

    https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling...&pageView:grid&minPrice:&maxPrice:&pageSize:&

    They have other photochromics on sale also but the Scattante Echelon are
    a) cheapest
    b) almost clear when in shade, easily useable as a twilight anti-bug lens
    c) sticky polymer slip resistant frames
    d) able to get dark enough for full sun on water
    e) not polarized - you can see your computer/phone in any orientation
    f) sensitive enough to detect the difference between fluorescent office light and incandescent light.

    In sum, they completely read on OP's wish list - except they're not strictly speaking a 2018 model, I've had mine a year.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
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  15. Plai

    Plai Paul Lai Skier

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    I want to thank all those who responded so far. You've introduced me to a few new names.

    I find myself picky (demanding?) about visual clarity/accuracy. Typically plastic (polycarbonate) lenses don't cut it. It was surprising to find comfort with the Costa del Mar Brine (580 plastic). I've tried a number of less expensive lenses (Coyote Shifter, Eddie Bauer <model?>), but the clarity hasn't been there -- I always find something optically distracting.

    I've also tried replacement lenses (Fuse) to repair the self-inflicted broken Smith Mavericks (glass lens), but they only have 15-30% light transmission. Way too dark for riding, great for day time strolling.

    So, yeah the search continues....
     
  16. cantunamunch

    cantunamunch Meh Skier

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    I can see why you're finding a cycling pair hard to find - matching that AND meeting commonplace cycling objectives like light weight, lens rinsability, ability to read LCD bike computers is going to be beastly. Your preferred plastic (for weight) lens is both yellow blocking (decidedly suboptimal for twilight rides) and polarizing (tough on reading bike comps unless positioned just so).

    *sees @fatbob to his reserved seat*
     
  17. Plai

    Plai Paul Lai Skier

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    Add to this that I'm "frugal" doesn't help. ;-)

    WRT polarization and electronics... I don't use a biking computer, so that's not it. 20+ years of polarized eyewear for fishing/driving have me pampered. Whenever now I see glare, the reaction is "Why isn't polarized eyewear the default? We have the technology. It's not expensive. It's safer too." Soooo much less eyestrain with polarized lens. If one doesn't feel tired, one tends to make better choices.
     
  18. cantunamunch

    cantunamunch Meh Skier

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    Sure, I understand. Most watersports fans will agree with you. Pilots will laugh.

    Of course, you don't use on bike electronics but a bunch of other cyclists do - and product designers optimize for that. The other thing about polarized - a polarized lens with significantly more than 50% VLT is a *bad* polarizing lens. So you're automatically in darker lenses that won't show their best in shade/twilight conditions.
     
  19. Tricia

    Tricia The Velvet Hammer Admin Pugski Ski Tester

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    The idea of polarization is to reduce glare and see through the water, whether its a lake or rain.
    Polarization is not ideal for skiing because snow is water and it has the potential to reduce depth perception when the snow is varied.
     
  20. Plai

    Plai Paul Lai Skier

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    Please educate me on "pilots will laugh". Would like to understand that viewpoint.

    I'm thinking I need to rethink this *need* for polarization. In the expressed application, high (>50%) VLT is desired.
     

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