Cage Match Comparison 2017 Blizzard Cochise vs 2017 Völkl 100Eight

Philpug

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The One Oh Somethings, are they 11/10th skis or charging crudbusters?

Screen Shot 2016-10-30 at 5.41.10 PM.png

The industry has pushed this segment hard in recent years, trying to create a class of ski that had no clear direction. In defense of these larger skis, there were actually several possible directions depending on a skier's needs, hence the confusion. In the wake of this confusion, one ski did rise to the top of the charts, the Blizzard Cochise. So, what will we pit against it? Völkl’s 100Eight, the younger and lighter replacement for the Gotama, which was the reference ski in this segment before the Cochise stole its title. Can the 100Eight avenge the family name?

This is not the Cochise that won “Ski of the Year” when it was introduced half a decade ago. The new carbon-enhanced Cochise scoffs at its predecessor, “I can’t believe you won Ski of the Year, I am so much better than you.” And it would be right. The addition of carbon at the extremities, some taper beyond the contact points, and, most important, camber underfoot makes for a much more responsive ski that does not require as much gravity as the first-gen ski, which felt like it needed to hit a certain speed to really get going. Almost the only similarity between the new one and the original is that they both say Blizzard Cochise and are 108 mm underfoot. Other than smearing turns, the new Cochise does everything better than the old one.

Just as I have never seen an episode of "Game of Thrones" or "The Walking Dead," I was never a Gotama fan: sacrilege, right? Not that the Goat was a bad ski, it just was never a ski for me; no matter which generation, it was just too much charge and not enough finesse for my liking. No biggy, I never took it personally, and I doubt Völkl did, either. I don’t think zee Germans missed one sale because of me. Now, welcome to the modern age: I believe once Völkl went to the 3D Ridge construction, its skis morphed from from being very good skis for a select group into great skis for the the masses without losing the personality and power that bigger or stronger skiers like. This shows just what a great construction can accomplish.
  • Why choose the Blizzard Cochise? Power, pure and simple; you want to charge and the 27m turning radius will still challenge you to do so. This ski loves to run, and speed is its friend.
  • Why choose the Völkl 100Eight? The 100Eight is not a finesse ski, but it can be finessed. This is a One Oh Something for the masses. If you want a ski in this range that can charge and play with the big boys but not demand you to, go this way.
  • Other skis in the class: Armada Invictus 108Ti, Dynastar Cham 2.0 107, Kästle BMX105, Salomon QST 106.
 

Jim McDonald

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20161101_143837.jpg
 

ZionPow

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Thanks for the review! I just ordered the 2016 Völkl 100EIGHT with Tyrolia Attack 13 from Ski Essentials. Now let it snow!:beercheer:
I have used my Völkl 100EIGHT skis for about 10 days of work now. They have excelled in all different conditions from 20+ inches of blower POW to wind blown chunder to bullet proof groomers. I have 3 pairs of skis in the Patrol bay and I grab the 100EIGHT's every morning. WOW!
 

Ken_R

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I havent demoed the Blizzard Cochise ever. Always been turned away from it by thinking (from reading reviews and comments only) that it was too much of a ski, that felt heavy underfoot and that it was hard to turn. The flattish tail hints to that. I always though it would be the worst ski for any bumps and tightish trees. Seems more like a big mountain ski meaning a ski only really good for going fast down wide open slopes with variable snow.

Phil, is that all true?
 
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Philpug

Philpug

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I havent demoed the Blizzard Cochise ever. Always been turned away from it by thinking (from reading reviews and comments only) that it was too much of a ski, that felt heavy underfoot and that it was hard to turn. The flattish tail hints to that. I always though it would be the worst ski for any bumps and tightish trees. Seems more like a big mountain ski meaning a ski only really good for going fast down wide open slopes with variable snow.

Phil, is that all true?
The Cochise likes gravity for sure and tight places might be work. The new one is a better ski for different skis than the original with the zero camber.
 

Drahtguy Kevin

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I havent demoed the Blizzard Cochise ever. Always been turned away from it by thinking (from reading reviews and comments only) that it was too much of a ski, that felt heavy underfoot and that it was hard to turn. The flattish tail hints to that. I always though it would be the worst ski for any bumps and tightish trees. Seems more like a big mountain ski meaning a ski only really good for going fast down wide open slopes with variable snow.

Phil, is that all true?
I spent a lot of time on the Cochise last season. I didn't find it too much work in bumps for it's width. Trees were more work but not terrible. I could flatten the ski and get it to smear and slarve when I wanted. The Cochise absolutely excels in open terrain devouring crud, mank, etc. The ski's stability at speed through crap snow is what endeared it to me.
 

Muleski

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I've had both generations of the Cochise. I'm 5'10", 200-210 lbs. I was pretty closely affiliated with them, so had access their lineup.
I agree with most of the comments above.

I would put the original Cochise at, or near the top of my list for all time crud skis. Open terrain, big turns, windblown, cut up, heavy....cruddy snow. I tip the more recent version with the carbon tips, and camber IS as PP suggests a lot more verstile ski. It's still a very good crud ski. Maybe great. It is a much better all round ski in a foot of powder.

I sold both pairs, cheap, to a friend who is a full time patroller in the Rockies. One or the other is his work ski depending on the snow.

I sold them as I just had too many skis, and these were getting limited use. I am along time Bonafide guy. Still am. I have had each generation since they rolled out. I ski it in a 187cm. Wish they built a 193cm. I also am a big Bodacious fan. I own the original one, with all of the metal in the 196cm. That obviously needs the right combination of snow and space. However, I ski the newer generation in a 193cm, and found that I was always reaching for it in fresh deeper snow.

So too much overlap with the Cochise in there. And I had pretty much drilled "crud ski" into my head with it. I have seen some great skiers on the Cochise, in all sorts of stuff: terrain and snow. There is a video shot with Marcus Caston skiing inbounds at Snowbird, where he is on a 177cm Cochise. Ripping. You can find it by Googling. It's a Blizzard video, I think.

I do think it likes a head of speed. Like a skilled, strong pilot. Not a game improvement ski. IF you do ski in the conditions where it works best, it's a good ski. For me, I wanted slightly narrower, and wider. Having said that, if I wanted one ski 95ish to 115ish, I do not think this would be my choice.

Crud ski. Yep.
 

ski otter 2

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These days, there are skis that will do both powder and crud very well - "resort powder" skis. To me, the Cochise is mostly for crud, optimally. Not as great for powder or powder bumps or tight places, for at least me. And not as great for lighter skiers - a bit planky then, seems like.

The big brother of the Völkl 100eight, the 112 V Werks Katana 184, is one example of the best of both worlds: both powder and crud, you pick the speed. Not sure if it works as well for over 200 lbs - maybe in the 191 length. In the 184 it does have great float, though, for up to at least 185 lbs.)

But, man, has this year's model gotten expensive (even though it's been the same ski except for graphics for 3 years now).
 

Josh Matta

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The OG cochise was one of the worst eastern skis I have ever owned and one of the best wide open western bowl in any conditions skis. The new one which I have only skied in the east is a much better skis for me back east, and I imagine would be great out west for more people.

The only skis I own similar to the Cochise is a 185cm El Capo which IMO is just as almost as good in crud as the OG cochise, but for me feels a ton better on packed snow, groomers, and bumps due to its camber underfoot, more tapered shape and slighly turnier sidecut. I liked the El capo so much I bought 2 pairs...

The other skis IMO that should be included in this category are the Moment Meridian and Fisher Ranger 108Ti
 

Dave J

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I watched the Marcus Caston Snowbird video (yes, he rips) and it was clear he was on Bonafide's for the final shots on the groomers.
I'm on the original Bonafide's and heavily leaning towards the '17/'18 version. Any thoughts on these vs. the new Cochise for a Squaw Valley daily driver? I also have a pair of 113mm-waist Nordica Patron's for powder days.
 
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Philpug

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I watched the Marcus Caston Snowbird video (yes, he rips) and it was clear he was on Bonafide's for the final shots on the groomers.
I'm on the original Bonafide's and heavily leaning towards the '17/'18 version. Any thoughts on these vs. the new Cochise for a Squaw Valley daily driver? I also have a pair of 113mm-waist Nordica Patron's for powder days.
Dave, didn't I sell you those Bonafides? If you have the Patron, no brainer, go for the upcoming Bonafide. I just had them up at Whistler in conditions and terrain that were very Squaw-like and it did everything I asked of it.
 

Big J

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The One Oh Somethings, are they 11/10th skis or charging crudbusters?

View attachment 15372
The industry has pushed this segment hard in recent years, trying to create a class of ski that had no clear direction. In defense of these larger skis, there were actually several possible directions depending on a skier's needs, hence the confusion. In the wake of this confusion, one ski did rise to the top of the charts, the Blizzard Cochise. So, what will we pit against it? Völkl’s 100Eight, the younger and lighter replacement for the Gotama, which was the reference ski in this segment before the Cochise stole its title. Can the 100Eight avenge the family name?

This is not the Cochise that won “Ski of the Year” when it was introduced half a decade ago. The new carbon-enhanced Cochise scoffs at its predecessor, “I can’t believe you won Ski of the Year, I am so much better than you.” And it would be right. The addition of carbon at the extremities, some taper beyond the contact points, and, most important, camber underfoot makes for a much more responsive ski that does not require as much gravity as the first-gen ski, which felt like it needed to hit a certain speed to really get going. Almost the only similarity between the new one and the original is that they both say Blizzard Cochise and are 108 mm underfoot. Other than smearing turns, the new Cochise does everything better than the old one.

Just as I have never seen an episode of "Game of Thrones" or "The Walking Dead," I was never a Gotama fan: sacrilege, right? Not that the Goat was a bad ski, it just was never a ski for me; no matter which generation, it was just too much charge and not enough finesse for my liking. No biggy, I never took it personally, and I doubt Völkl did, either. I don’t think zee Germans missed one sale because of me. Now, welcome to the modern age: I believe once Völkl went to the 3D Ridge construction, its skis morphed from from being very good skis for a select group into great skis for the the masses without losing the personality and power that bigger or stronger skiers like. This shows just what a great construction can accomplish.
  • Why choose the Blizzard Cochise? Power, pure and simple; you want to charge and the 27m turning radius will still challenge you to do so. This ski loves to run, and speed is its friend.
  • Why choose the Völkl 100Eight? The 100Eight is not a finesse ski, but it can be finessed. This is a One Oh Something for the masses. If you want a ski in this range that can charge and play with the big boys but not demand you too, go this way.
  • Other skis in the class: Armada Invictus 108Ti, Dynastar Cham 2.0 107, Kästle BMX 105, Salomon QST 106.
I have the original Ski of the year Cochise and really like it. I have not skied the new Cochise or the Völkl 100eight although I did consider the Völkl when it came out I also own the Kästle BMX 108 and really like it as well.
 
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