1987 Schwinn Cimarron?

Tominator

Totally in the present
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
191
Location
Boston Metro West
This is my first post in the Cycling section and I'm not sure where to post it, but here goes:

I have a 1987 Schwinn Cimarron 'Mountain Bike' that I bought brand new in 1987:

19" frame (I think)
All Shimano Deore-XT componentry
Somewhat heavy, but very smooth riding.

I rode it regularly for about 6 years, but since then it's been languishing in my basement. It's in fine shape, albeit somewhat dusty and grimy. The only thing non-stock about it are the bars and hand grips, as I replaced the original upswept bars with flat ones when I bought it.

Now, I'm thinking I'd like to get back into recreational cycling. I really liked this bike, but it's a 32-year old design. However it's sort of what in today's market would be termed an all-purpose model, which is what I'd want for casual road riding and light duty off-road use.

And now it appears to be worth a lot as a 'vintage' model - I saw one on EBay going for $1,700 (https://www.ebay.com/itm/303103840111).

So, I guess I have 2 options (I used to do all my own maintenance except wheel-truing, but I no longer have the time or inclination to do that):
  • Have it serviced at a local bike shop to be in like-new condition - the only new things it should need is tires, brake pads, and maybe a chain, since they must have pretty much dried out by now - and then sell it and buy something new with the proceeds;
or
  • Have it serviced at a local bike shop to be in like-new condition and then start riding it again?
Advice please!
 

jmeb

Stereotypical Front Range Weekend Warrior
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
3,045
Location
Colorado
When you say "ride recreationally" what do you envision? If you are mostly thinking sub-20 mile rides around town at a leisurely pace, it'd be a great bike. If you want to ride with friends on road bikes -- you'll want something more modern and suited to that.

Serviced with nice tires and fresh consumables it'll be a great rider. I have its one-model below sibling -- a High Sierra. It is one of the versatile commuting bikes I've ever owned. I've even ridden a handful of centuries on it when touring.

The $1700 is a complete misnomer. Given your bike was used for 6 years, and needs a complete overhaul most likely, the most you'd get (if it is in good shape) at this point would be $2-300. Which is only if you found someone who knew what that bike is. You won't make your money back having it completely overhauled at a shop.
 

Josh Matta

Skiing the powder
Pass Pulled
Joined
Dec 21, 2015
Posts
4,126
there is no reason to ride it, and its really isnt worth more than 50 dollar. THe ebay listing is fishing for a sucker.

300 dollars(the cost of tune up) can get you half way decent used MTB or hybrid bike of some sort.

Anyone who pay 1700 dollars for one needs their head examined
 

jmeb

Stereotypical Front Range Weekend Warrior
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
3,045
Location
Colorado
there is no reason to ride it, and its really isnt worth more than 50 dollar. ...
A Cimarron in decent condition is worth more than $50 to lots of people. Mostly as a collectors item. Or more usefully, as a very capable commuter or tourer with a nice steel frame, tons of braze ons, clearances for fenders, and the like. You could sell a frameset alone in decent condition alone all day for $100.

It's not worth $1700.
 
Last edited:
Thread Starter
TS
Tominator

Tominator

Totally in the present
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
191
Location
Boston Metro West
Thanks for the advice. Seems like it's not worth servicing in terms of profitable reselling. And I may want a little more performance than, "... sub-20 mile rides around town at a leisurely pace," so it's not worth servicing to keep it. But I may be able to get a few bucks in trade on a new road/trail hybrid maybe in the $1k range. That's what I'll shoot for, anyway, I think.
 

scott43

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
4,578
Location
Toronto, Canada
A Cimarron in decent condition is worth more than $50 to lots of people. Mostly as a collectors item. Or more usefully, as a very capable commuter or tourer with a nice steel frame, tons of braze ons, clearances for fenders, and the like. You could sell a frameset alone in decent condition alone all day for $100.

It's not worth $1700.
Yeah..I mean, something is worth whatever someone else will pay. Is a Ferrari 166 worth $10mil? Well, to drive to work, no. But it obviously has value. So I agree there.

I would say though..you lose access to a lot of new products by using old stuff. And the benefits of years of refinement. Old bikes are good as clunkers..but..
 

scott43

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
4,578
Location
Toronto, Canada
Thanks for the advice. Seems like it's not worth servicing in terms of profitable reselling. And I may want a little more performance than, "... sub-20 mile rides around town at a leisurely pace," so it's not worth servicing to keep it. But I may be able to get a few bucks in trade on a new road/trail hybrid maybe in the $1k range. That's what I'll shoot for, anyway, I think.
No shop will trade, just FYI. Just sell to a vintage guy and put the money into something new. Or keep it as a novelty if you can afford to. I have absolutely ZERO attachment or desire to have back my 1980's Stumpjumper... Good riddance.. :D

Or my Schwinn Paramount 70..
 

cantunamunch

Meh
Skier
Joined
Nov 17, 2015
Posts
8,420
And I may want a little more performance than, "... sub-20 mile rides around town at a leisurely pace," so it's not worth servicing to keep it. .
It sounds like you don't have the inclination to convert it to a drop bar hybrid in the meantime?
 

Bad Bob

old n' slow
Skier
Joined
Dec 2, 2015
Posts
2,039
Location
Home in Spokalou for the foreseeable future
Got a used Costco Skykomish 15 years ago for $75, pretty much all Shimano components of reasonable quality. Over the last 15+ years have put a couple sets of tires and pads on it, some cables, grips, and asundery stuff as it seemed like a good idea. Still probably worth about $75. Have thought many times about replacing it and road some nice bikes but with the level of riding I don't do, would rather waste my money on other toys.

Free advice from another gray hair (being free take it for what you paid for it), make yours work ride it for a while and see of you will ride it enough to warrant a new bike.
 

jmeb

Stereotypical Front Range Weekend Warrior
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
3,045
Location
Colorado
Old bikes are good as clunkers
Meh. Depends on why you ride. I commute year round about 5mi each way. Plus use my bike as primary means of errand running, grocery shopping, etc. Most of my ~4k yearly miles are on a 1983 -- but it runs just as well as my 2017 Surly if not better. The frame of both that bike (a Trek) and my Schwinn High Sierra are both nicer than the Surly.

Are any of them going to win races? No.
Are there more fun bikes for serious road or mtn riding? Yes.
Are they simply clunkers? Hardly.
 

cantunamunch

Meh
Skier
Joined
Nov 17, 2015
Posts
8,420
Meh. Depends on why you ride. .
...and how much work you are willing/able to do for yourself. I don't get the impression OP wants to do things like lace a modernish hub to wider rims or respace the rear or mess with changing the shifter/brake combos, let alone change the fork or do disc adapter kits.

Which is alright - someone in the Boston area will get a perfectly nice project frame.
 

graham418

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Posts
1,642
Location
Toronto
It is a bike, with a bit of heritage... Make a nice commuter or shopping bike , with the addition of some fenders and bags. Service it yourself. its about time you learned how anyways .
And if it gets stolen while you're shopping, oh well .
 

Crank

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Dec 19, 2015
Posts
1,263
Put some air in the tires and ride it. If you like it fine. If not then get a new bike.

A new bike might be a little more efficient but do you really care that much?
 
Thread Starter
TS
Tominator

Tominator

Totally in the present
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
191
Location
Boston Metro West
Well, I do know how to clean it, adjust everything, put air in the tires, even replace components - but I probably won't.
You guys have given me a fresh perspective, and I appreciate it. I may pump up the tires and take it for a spin, but then I'll probably buy a new bike!
 
Top